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Automatic verus Manual Bypass Valve.

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  • 13-05-2010 2:33am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 816 ✭✭✭


    I think an automatic bypass valve on an oil heating system is the way to go.

    My friend's plumber wants to fit a manual 'penny' valve and leave it a small bit open.

    I think the way an automatic valve works is, it is fully closed when you don't need it and fully open when you do need it.

    The manual valve is open a small bit when you don't need it ( I think this is inefficient ) and only open a small bit when you do need it. ( I think this isn't good enough pressure release ).

    The only advantage I can see in having a manual one is, it will definitely work in some fashion if all other routes are closed off.

    I don't know how reliable automatic bypass valves are, would it be OTT to fit 2 automatic bypass valves in parallel, in case one fails ?.
    Say if the system is pressurised to 1.5 bar, have one set to 2 bar and the other set to 2.25 bar.

    I presume automatic bypass valves are set below 3 bar, so they will provide a return path before any 3 bar safety valves blow.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,262 ✭✭✭✭Joey the lips


    with due respect....what does the plumber think...


    http://www.myson.co.uk/products/1207_1625_ENU_HTML.htm


    This would be my choice.... if your worried you can fit a penny valve in line under it so if it fails you can just take it off and use the penny valve as you suggest however I have not seen too many fail, in fact out of 1000 i prob only saw one. However I did not do upgrades a lot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 44,080 ✭✭✭✭Micky Dolenz


    Satts wrote: »
    I think an automatic bypass valve on an oil heating system is the way to go.

    My friend's plumber wants to fit a manual 'penny' valve and leave it a small bit open.

    I think the way an automatic valve works is, it is fully closed when you don't need it and fully open when you do need it.

    The manual valve is open a small bit when you don't need it ( I think this is inefficient ) and only open a small bit when you do need it. ( I think this isn't good enough pressure release ).

    The only advantage I can see in having a manual one is, it will definitely work in some fashion if all other routes are closed off.

    I don't know how reliable automatic bypass valves are, would it be OTT to fit 2 automatic bypass valves in parallel, in case one fails ?.
    Say if the system is pressurised to 1.5 bar, have one set to 2 bar and the other set to 2.25 bar.

    I presume automatic bypass valves are set below 3 bar, so they will provide a return path before any 3 bar safety valves blow.

    two would be OTT. A lot of oil boiler systems don't have pump overruns and would shut down as soon as power is lost to boiler. Expect to pay around €35 for vlave.


  • Registered Users Posts: 816 ✭✭✭Satts


    with due respect....what does the plumber think...

    He thinks the penny valve is fine, " That's what all the lads are using ".


  • Registered Users Posts: 816 ✭✭✭Satts


    two would be OTT. A lot of oil boiler systems don't have pump overruns and would shut down as soon as power is lost to boiler. Expect to pay around €35 for vlave.

    It is one of the new efficient FireBird oil boilers.
    It has a switched live input and a permanent live input.
    It has a Frost Stat and pump over run built in.

    I think when my friend is paying out to renew his system to a 3 zone system it is a shame to be wasting hot water every time the boiler is fired for the sake of a couple of quid.


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