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Sabertooth Was Pussy Compared To Big Daddy Lion

  • 09-11-2009 10:40pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Although it is much more famous, research has shown that the legendary sabertooth cat (Smilodon fatalis) would have been little match for it's larger (and apparently more aggresive) contemporary, the American cave lion (Panthera leo atrox).
    The researchers report that while male American lions were considerably larger than females, male and female sabertoothed cats were indistinguishable in size. The findings suggest that sabertooths may have been less aggressive than their fellow felines, researchers say.

    In species where males fight for mates, bigger, heavier males have a better chance of winning fights, fending off their rivals and gaining access to females. After generations of male-male competition, the males of some species evolve to be much larger than their mates.

    So, in summary the male sabertooth cat was a bit of a 'pussy cat', so to speak. I guess it means the depiction in Walking With Beasts, where the male Smilodon was shown as an aggresive alpha male type battling it's rivals for mates, was most likely wrong.
    Full article here.

    wb_prehistoric.Par.51083.Image.225.182.1.gif
    Size comparison between sabertooth (left) and cave lion (right).


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    Interesting article.

    I saw Hercules the Liger at Jungle Island in Florida a few years back, and he was bloody huge. The American Lion was meant to be comparable in size to a Liger, so they must have been a really formidable feline.


    It is also interesting, to me, that the Lion would have most likely shared it's habit with another group hunter, th Dire wolf, and both of them would have had to contend with the massive Short Face Bear, which lived in the same areas and is seen as being more carnivore than omnivore.

    There must have been some immense face offs over the carcasses of downed prey.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 10,073 marco_polo


    Kess73 wrote: »
    Interesting article.

    I saw Hercules the Liger at Jungle Island in Florida a few years back, and he was bloody huge. The American Lion was meant to be comparable in size to a Liger, so they must have been a really formidable feline.


    It is also interesting, to me, that the Lion would have most likely shared it's habit with another group hunter, th Dire wolf, and both of them would have had to contend with the massive Short Face Bear, which lived in the same areas and is seen as being more carnivore than omnivore.

    There must have been some immense face offs over the carcasses of downed prey.

    Just went looking after this post, I had no idea what size Ligers could get to. :eek:

    page7_blog_entry90_7.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,560 ✭✭✭✭ Kess73


    marco_polo wrote: »
    Just went looking after this post, I had no idea what size Ligers could get to. :eek:

    page7_blog_entry90_7.jpg



    That's the exact Liger I was talking about. That is Hercules from Florida. He is a massive and majestic animal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    Kess73 wrote: »
    It is also interesting, to me, that the Lion would have most likely shared it's habit with another group hunter, th Dire wolf, and both of them would have had to contend with the massive Short Face Bear, which lived in the same areas and is seen as being more carnivore than omnivore.

    There must have been some immense face offs over the carcasses of downed prey.

    Jurassic Fight Club dedicated an episode to the short faced bear versus the 'mega lion'.


    There were also cheetahs and camels in ice age North America. Not to mention the odd terror bird!

    re: the liger;
    It's a weird genetic defect. When lions and tigers cross breed the gene which causes growth to stop at maturity doesn't transfer properly, meaning tehy grow for pretty much their entire life.


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