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LearN AraBiC (LeSson 2)

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  • 04-08-2009 8:20am
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 6


    Greetings:

    A:sabaah el kheer "Good morning" صباح الخير
    B:sabaah el noor "Good morning" صباح النور

    A:masaa’ el kheer "Good evening" مساء الخير
    B:masaa’ el noor "Good evening" مساء النور

    A:tesbah (e) ala kheer "Good night" تصبح علي خير
    tesbahi (F) ala kheer تصبحي علي خير

    B:w enta (e) men ahlo "Good night" وانت من أهله
    w enti (F) men ahlo وانتِ من أهله

    A:essalaamu aleekum "peace be upon you" السلامُ عليكم
    B:w aleekum essalaam w “peace be upon you, & و عليكم السلام و
    rahmatu llaahi w barakaatu God's compassion & رحمة الله و بركاته
    his blessings"
    A:ahlan wa sahlan "Hello"/ "Welcome" أهلا و سهلا
    B:ahlan beek (e) "Hello" أهلا بيك
    ahlan beeki(f) أهلا بيكي

    A: ezzayyak (e) "How're you" ازَّيَّك
    ezzayyek (F) ازَّيِّك
    B: alhamdulellaah "Thank God" الحمدُ لله
    kwayyes (e) "Fine" كويس
    kwayyesa (F) كويس
    ة
    http://arabeya.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=57&Itemid=65


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 148 ✭✭parkerpen


    Seems pretty difficult!


  • Registered Users Posts: 148 ✭✭parkerpen


    A friend of mine who's into languages tried it and didn't hack it at all.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6 just_adream


    parkerpen wrote: »
    Seems pretty difficult!

    Dear friend
    its not difficult as you think
    and you can find more Arabic words on that link
    http://arabeya.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=29&Itemid=65
    that words may help you to find that Arabic is not difficult as you think.
    ;)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭Morlar


    If Irish primary kids were starting a third language would they not be better served learning French or German, Italian etc ? Same alphabet, more relevance, easier to get a grasp of etc ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6 just_adream


    Morlar wrote: »
    If Irish primary kids were starting a second language would they not be better served learning French or German, Italian etc ? Same alphabet, more relevance, easier to get a grasp of etc ?

    you maybe right but learning Arabic is also important thing
    Do you know that Arabic is spoken by more than 280 million people as a first language and by 250 million more as a second language.

    So I think its important to learn Arabic ;)


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭Morlar


    you maybe right but learning Arabic is also important thing
    Do you know that Arabic is spoken by more than 280 million people as a first language and by 250 million more as a second language.

    So I think its important to learn Arabic ;)

    If that is the motivation why not chineese? Spoken by about 1,000,000,000 people.

    I think Irish children would be better served (if learning a language additional to English and Irish) to start with a european one. It would be easier to learn, and of more relevance due to the closeness of Ireland to Europe.

    I see no sense in starting to teach middle eastern languages, and if we were then why not hebrew ?

    Latin would be more useful than arabic in the modern world in my view (& yes I know it is not a middle eastern one).

    All of which is not withstanding the fact that it would be extremely difficult (in my view) for a child from a western background to pick it up to begin with.

    Also why exactly do you think it important for Irish children to learn arabic over say a European language ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6 just_adream


    Morlar wrote: »
    If that is the motivation why not chineese? Spoken by about 1,000,000,000 people.

    I think Irish children would be better served (if learning a language additional to English and Irish) to start with a european one. It would be easier to learn, and of more relevance due to the closeness of Ireland to Europe.

    I see no sense in starting to teach middle eastern languages, and if we were then why not hebrew ?

    Latin would be more useful than arabic in the modern world in my view (& yes I know it is not a middle eastern one).

    All of which is not withstanding the fact that it would be extremely difficult (in my view) for a child from a western background to pick it up to begin with.

    Also why exactly do you think it important for Irish children to learn arabic over say a European language ?

    I'm not saying that learning European language is not important,
    but also no one can deny the importance of Arabic language.
    So for more information about Arabic language, please check that link
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language :P


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,273 ✭✭✭Morlar


    I'm not saying that learning European language is not important,
    but also no one can deny the importance of Arabic language.
    So for more information about Arabic language, please check that link
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language :P

    I can deny/disagree with you on the level of relevance or importance of the arabic language in the modern world.

    Well just how many languages should primary children be expected to learn ?

    I would put arabic toward the very bottom of the list and in front of it would come just about every other european language. Followed by Chineese and japaneese and arabic at the end.

    Unless the motivation for learning it is religious (which is one of the few reasons european people learn it anyway, because they have converted to islam).

    Even for an adult it is (according to college graduated muslims I have spoken to) extremely difficult to learn and takes several years of constant study.

    Expecting Irish primary school children to pick it up when it is not part of their culture, not spoken in their homes etc is extremely unlikely in my view.

    I noticed you also advertised a course for people to go to egypt for a few weeks to learn it at an institute there too, & as I don't understand why you think this would be to the benefit of Irish school children can I ask is your motivation in this financial or religious in any way ?

    You have said 'it's a great langauge'. But you have not given clear reasons why Irish parents would think their children would be better off learning arabic (or I should say trying to learn arabic) than they would be in learning Italian, French or German etc.

    The interactions within europe are such that a european language in addition to your own is a massive advantage. Not to mention opening up worlds of modern and classical literature, or opening up safe modern countries with a 1st world standard of living to to try living in for a period. I just do not see the advantages to Irish school children (who are not islamic anyway that is).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6 just_adream


    Morlar wrote: »
    I can deny/disagree with you on the level of relevance or importance of the arabic language in the modern world.

    Well just how many languages should primary children be expected to learn ?

    I would put arabic toward the very bottom of the list and in front of it would come just about every other european language. Followed by Chineese and japaneese and arabic at the end.

    Unless the motivation for learning it is religious (which is one of the few reasons european people learn it anyway, because they have converted to islam).

    Even for an adult it is (according to college graduated muslims I have spoken to) extremely difficult to learn and takes several years of constant study.

    Expecting Irish primary school children to pick it up when it is not part of their culture, not spoken in their homes etc is extremely unlikely in my view.

    I noticed you also advertised a course for people to go to egypt for a few weeks to learn it at an institute there too, & as I don't understand why you think this would be to the benefit of Irish school children can I ask is your motivation in this financial or religious in any way ?

    You have said 'it's a great langauge'. But you have not given clear reasons why Irish parents would think their children would be better off learning arabic (or I should say trying to learn arabic) than they would be in learning Italian, French or German etc.

    The interactions within europe are such that a european language in addition to your own is a massive advantage. Not to mention opening up worlds of modern and classical literature, or opening up safe modern countries with a 1st world standard of living to to try living in for a period. I just do not see the advantages to Irish school children (who are not islamic anyway that is).

    Dear friend

    Its your point of view, but i'm sure that there are too many persons disagree with that , and of course i'm one of them.
    and the course that i was talk about it , you dont have to travel to Egypt to learn you can learn it online.
    :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 164 ✭✭dungeon


    This is turning out to be an interesting discussion. My opinion, for what it's worth, is that young children do well to be exposed to languages. More than three languages, however, especially at a young age, is probably a bit of overload. The curriculum is getting quite overloaded so if I had to choose languages for my children, Arabic would certainly not be one of them - unless of course there was a likelihood of my children living in the Arab world. That, is not very likely.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 164 ✭✭dungeon


    The fact that the alphabet is different also makes it difficult. I have seen children in Ireland, whose parents come from overseas, studying languages and religions from the middle and far East, at a young age. This is very understandable that parents would want their children to be up to speed.
    It is particularly understandable if the family intends returning to their home country. It is very difficult for children as young as 6 or 7 , however, to spend several hours each day, having spent a full day in school. I have seen and heard of some of these children being very tired and sometimes confused. I'm not saying it's right or wrong but I do think it can be hard on some of these children, especially if there is, for example, a learning difficulty.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 164 ✭✭dungeon


    Sorry if I have gone off the topic slightly but the discussion did seem to be talking about the learning of Arabic as opposed to European Languages.


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭yurmothrintites


    Young children have enough to learn in the classroom rather than also learning another language such as Arabic. It would have very little relevance to the children's lives. They would come across it very rarely unless they have an association with a country that speaks it or a religion that utilizes it. I can see no need for it in the primary classroom.


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