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Support for the victims of institutional abuse

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  • 27-05-2009 5:34pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 379 ✭✭


    Like everyone else in the country I am totally apalled at the findings of the Ryan Report, and like many many people I would like to somehow show my support for the countless victims.
    I have a simple proposal for the ordinary people of Ireland to show both our support for the victims and our disapproval for the stance of the religious orders.
    I expect it would be difficult to organise and synchronise a nationwide "protest"; an event in Dublin would automatically rule out over half the country (even arranging a march/protest/vigil in Dublin, Cork, Galway, Waterford and Limerick would leave many people unable to attend). A nationwide minute of silence, while an apt gesture, is by definition passive.
    What I have in mind is a synchronised "walk-out" at 12 o'clock mass this Sunday, in every church in the country. My suggestion is that when the priest comes to the front of the altar at the start of the mass, everyone literally stands up, turns their backs and walks out. It would require that people who are not regular church-goers go to their local church on Sunday to do this. I would also urge people who ARE regular church-goers to show their support in the same way. It would take literally 10 minutes of your time.
    I know people will say that the Catholic Church as an organisation is not the direct subject of the Ryan Report, rather the 18 religious orders. However, these orders are under the umbrella of the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland, the same church that for decades covered up systematic abuse and when offenders' crimes came to light simply moved those offenders elsewhere. The words of Cardinal Brady and Archbishop Martin this week are welcome, but they need to know that it's not enough. People will also say that a walk-out on Sunday is not the right thing to do, that it will demoralise the already dejected ordinary priests of Ireland. It will, but it would pale into infinite insignificance compared to the horror suffered by thousands of Irish children over decades.
    We the people of Ireland need to get the message across that we are extrememely unhappy with the Church's inaction, and what better place to do it than on their own doorstep.
    I also challenge all TDs, Senators, and councillors and MEPs either seeking first-time election or re-election next week to show your support. This is your chance to show that you are in touch with the people of Ireland, to put your money where your mouth is. This call in particular goes to Eamon Gilmore and Enda Kenny; I don't want to disrespect anyone by using a sporting metaphor, but this is your chance to step up to the plate. Also to An Taoiseach and the members of his government; I ask you to show your support too, but somehow I expect that you're so tied up with the establishment that you will be found wanting. (by the way I want to make clear that I am not a member of, nor affiliated to any political party or organisation, I am just an ordinary citizen of Ireland).
    This is chance for the people of Ireland to both show our support for the victims and to show the Church and the government that we are disgusted with the situation we find ourselves in and that has brought worldwide shame on our wonderful little country. I am asking for direct action, but no one will get hurt and I'm not asking people to burn down their local church. If enough of us do this, maybe the powers that be in both Church and State will sit up and take notice. When the Catholic hierarchy see churches full to the brim at 12 noon, and half empty at 12:02 they will realise the mood of the people.
    Finally, I would not want to go ahead with what I'm suggesting without the support of the victims' groups. If they don't think it's appropriate, then it isn't and won't happen.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,992 ✭✭✭✭partyatmygaff


    Just as has been said, A few animals who are in a position of trust decide to abuse their power (In the past) does not mean the organisation they are representing is to blame, the church (Surprising as it may seem for some of you) does not advocate rather prohibits child abuse.

    Instead of organising mass protests at the churches, how about protests at the government to prosecute the offenders?
    Less lynch-mob mentality.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,369 ✭✭✭✭Princess Consuela Bananahammock


    Just as has been said, A few animals who are in a position of trust decide to abuse their power (In the past) does not mean the organisation they are representing is to blame, the church (Surprising as it may seem for some of you) does not advocate rather prohibits child abuse.

    Instead of organising mass protests at the churches, how about protests at the government to prosecute the offenders?
    Less lynch-mob mentality.

    If the Christian Brothers can be held responsible as an organisation for what happened, then the parties in government at the time should be help responsible for letting them get away with it and for sending them vulnerable children.

    Everything I don't like is either woke or fascist - possibly both - pick one.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,639 ✭✭✭PeakOutput


    there is a thread for this already


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 21,191 ✭✭✭✭Latchy


    Just as has been said, A few animals who are in a position of trust decide to abuse their power (In the past) does not mean the organisation they are representing is to blame, the church (Surprising as it may seem for some of you) does not advocate rather prohibits child abuse.

    Instead of organising mass protests at the churches, how about protests at the government to prosecute the offenders?
    Less lynch-mob mentality.
    A few animals ? Were talking about hundreds of priests and nuns ,maybe more . As a senior priest said today on rte radio , '' this wasn't a case of a few bad apples in a good barrel , the barrell itself was rotten to the core '' .

    He was speaking about the establisment that allowed the abuse to exist .


  • Posts: 6,025 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    The OPs idea of a walkout at mass, dosent scream lynch mob to me, rather it sounds like a quiet dignified way to register your upset and disgust.

    I also think they should not be allowed use certain names,
    Sister of mercy?? no.
    Christian brothers? no.

    No mercy, No Christianity shown,


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  • Registered Users Posts: 379 ✭✭horseflesh


    Just as has been said, A few animals who are in a position of trust decide to abuse their power (In the past) does not mean the organisation they are representing is to blame, the church (Surprising as it may seem for some of you) does not advocate rather prohibits child abuse.

    Instead of organising mass protests at the churches, how about protests at the government to prosecute the offenders?
    Less lynch-mob mentality.

    Instead of leaping to the defence of the organisation that let this happen for decades, how about reading my post/suggestion properly?
    And please spare us the "bad apples" line, it's gone beyond insulting at this stage.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,456 ✭✭✭✭Mr Benevolent


    Also, a protest about the government having to pay compensation. That's our taxes bulking up the compensation fund. I didn't abuse anybody.

    Let the church pay the whole thing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 423 ✭✭jonnreeks


    Anyone following the current TV drama "The woman in the wall" on BBC 1, with its attempts at confronting the wickedness of the Magdalene laundries!



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