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Few Questions

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  • 01-02-2008 1:24pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8,326 ✭✭✭


    During your hillstart, if you roll back a small bit is that a fail?

    Also what's the difference between 3rd Party Fire & Theft and Fully Comprehensive insurance?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 634 ✭✭✭IrishPhoenix


    3rd Party Fire and Theft covers you if your belongings inside the car are stolen, your car goes on fire and if you damage another person's car/property. The difference between it and fully comprehensive is that it does not cover damage done to you and your car in an accident and fully comprehensive does.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,988 ✭✭✭✭Wishbone Ash


    Just to add that 3rd Party cover is a legal requirement when driving on a public road wheras 3rd Party Fire and Theft and Comprehensive Insurance are optional.


  • Registered Users Posts: 976 ✭✭✭Glenman


    Not sure about rolling back a small bit on the hillstart. I'd say rolling back a small bit due to poor timing on the clutch biting point and the handbrake would only be a grade 2 but not sure. In my pretest I forgot to put the car into first and I rolled back nearly a foot and had to slam on the brakes to avoid hitting the car behind. Now thats a fail! Lucky it was the pretest and not the real thing


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,825 ✭✭✭SeanW


    During your hillstart, if you roll back a small bit is that a fail?

    Also what's the difference between 3rd Party Fire & Theft and Fully Comprehensive insurance?
    It can be.

    And besides, it should not happen.

    You should have brought the clutch to the "bite" and confirm that the front of the car has risen, before disengaging the handbrake.

    This not only ensures the car doesn't roll back, but also protects against other mistakes like forgetting to change into gear.

    3rd Party insurance, also known as TPO, only covers people other than the driver, for damage and/or injury caused by the driver.

    TPFT covers 3rd party damage and injury, as well as loss due to fire or the car being stolen, but does not cover the driver's injury etc in an accident.

    Comprehensive covers you for any losses or injuries you might have in an accident, even if that accident was your fault or there is no other insuree to claim off.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 154 ✭✭redcar


    3rd Party Fire and Theft covers you if your belongings inside the car are stolen, your car goes on fire and if you damage another person's car/property. The difference between it and fully comprehensive is that it does not cover damage done to you and your car in an accident and fully comprehensive does.
    Does TPFT cover belongings inside your car? I thought it would only cover if the car itself was stolen. If it does thats pretty kewl.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,988 ✭✭✭✭Wishbone Ash


    redcar wrote: »
    Does TPFT cover belongings inside your car? I thought it would only cover if the car itself was stolen. If it does thats pretty kewl.
    I always assumed it only covered the theft of the vehicle itself. I can't see any insurance company covering contents unless there was an upper limit. Although unlikely, the contents could be worth more than the vehicle.

    Now, where did I leave that Rolex watch? mmmmm ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,502 ✭✭✭chris85


    I would say you would defo get at least a grade 2 and quite possibly a grade 3 (instant fail) mark for even a little roll back. As mentioned already there is no reason the car shold be going back at all if you are doing it correctly. Just make sure you have the handbrake up fully and can control the biting point of the clutch.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,157 ✭✭✭✭Alanstrainor


    As Chris said, the car should not move back at all on a hill start. I think you'd be heavily penalised for doing so in a test, although i don't know if it'd be a grade 2 or a straight fail as it's pretty serious thing.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9 Jessicad


    I'm doing lessons at the moment- my instructor said it would be a fail if you did roll back...:confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,157 ✭✭✭✭Alanstrainor


    I seem to remember being told that it was a straight fail also, but i don't know for sure, so didn't want to make it seem like i did.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,326 ✭✭✭Zapp Brannigan


    Cool thanks for the replies. Been practising hill starts in my driveway and I've gotten the hang of them now. Cheers!


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