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Sale of The Bodega

  • 04-02-2007 10:35am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,223 pro_gnostic_8


    How many more millions does this one man need?

    I'm talking about Owen O'Callaghan who (reported in Friday's papers) has bought the Bodega for @7 million. The plan is to tear it down and built apartments/retail space on the site.

    Now, love or loath the Bodega, it was a popular watering hole. And a building of historical interest and architecturally pleasing on the eye. Now to be replaced by some drab Stalin-era-style shopping centre/flats. The Coal Quay area is, as you know, one of the oldest parts of Cork. And the soul of this city is being ripped out by these "developers". They take it all and give nothing back except apartment blocks.

    Last year, Owen O'Callaghan bought another fine old Cork pub in a neighbouring street (The Grand Circle) and promptly closed it down to build on the site. Last month he seized back from Triskel Gallery ( a non-profit arts organisation) the exhibition hall on Lavitts Quay in order to lease it out as a retail outlet. Many more examples, but these three are just 2 minutes walk from each other.

    God help us from these property deveopers! :mad:


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Comments

  • Administrators Posts: 33,524 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ dudara


    And yet no one is willing to buy the Coal Quay bar and tear it down!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,707 ✭✭✭ opus


    Coincidentally I read on archiseek.com that he had bought the Coal Quay bar as well, no idea if that's true or not. I doubt there would be permission to demolish those buildings though?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,223 pro_gnostic_8


    A very interesting forum (archiseek) Opus -- one that I had not previously been aware of. Well worth bookmarking, thank you for that.

    Yeah, on reflection I'm beginning to believe that a restriction order will be enforced to protect the fine old limestone exterior of the Bodega. Though I take a naturally cynical view of the integrity of the planning permission laws at local Government level ;) , I think a complete "knock-down" of the building would be too hard to stomach by even the most phillistine of politicians. I hope so, anyway, in this case!

    Even so, I regret the passing of another landmark pub in Cork City ......... they are becoming a near extinct species.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,375 ✭✭✭ kmick


    This is slightly off topic but I was born and bred in Cork but am now living in Dublin for about 7 years. Everytime I go back I find the choice of bars and nightclubs atrocious. The ones I know are reasonable are
    The Brog
    The Bodega
    Sin E
    Apart from that there are no good clubs at all that I can see.
    Any recomendations?

    As for my opinion on developers Im kinda in two minds. If it was not for developers/entrepeneurs the Bodega would never have existed in the first place. Secondly it has gone downhill lately although it is still a reasonable pub. On the other hand they should not have a free hand. However like all things in ireland it is only the decent honest people who ever get in trouble with planning permission. Most developers seem to flout the law and never get bothered. This is exasperated by the fact that the companies that build open and close yearly. The open, build a complex, sell the management to a management company and close down.

    So anyway Cork wheres the buzz - I need to know so i can reacquaint myself with the real capital. PS I am over 30 so I dont want any teenybopper paradise suggestions.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,684 Owen


    Well, The Crane Lane is fast becoming my new spot, very different indeed! I also like The Classic, Suas, and that new spot where Pi Restaurant was across from the Courthouse.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 879 Karter Limited Temper


    How many more millions does this one man need?

    I'm talking about Owen O'Callaghan who (reported in Friday's papers) has bought the Bodega for @7 million. The plan is to tear it down and built apartments/retail space on the site.

    Now, love or loath the Bodega, it was a popular watering hole. And a building of historical interest and architecturally pleasing on the eye. Now to be replaced by some drab Stalin-era-style shopping centre/flats. The Coal Quay area is, as you know, one of the oldest parts of Cork. And the soul of this city is being ripped out by these "developers". They take it all and give nothing back except apartment blocks.

    Last year, Owen O'Callaghan bought another fine old Cork pub in a neighbouring street (The Grand Circle) and promptly closed it down to build on the site. Last month he seized back from Triskel Gallery ( a non-profit arts organisation) the exhibition hall on Lavitts Quay in order to lease it out as a retail outlet. Many more examples, but these three are just 2 minutes walk from each other.

    God help us from these property deveopers! :mad:


    I've no opinion either way on the man (owen O'callaghan), but it should be pointed out:

    (a) There has been absolutely no mention anywhere other than the above the post that the "plan is to tear it down and built apartments/retail space on the site". As far as I'm aware, the building will be left as is and see a single large retail installed.

    (b) "the soul of this city is being ripped out by these "developers". - do you remember cornmarket street 4/5 years ago? It was far worse than it is now. Finaly we've got some development on the eastern side (Guys) and the space to the west could do with being utilised more effectively. For one, having that large furniture warehouse there is just a waste of space. Whatever your feeling on loosing a well-liked pub, it would never have been there in the first place if "developers" hadn't converted the former market.

    (c)Finally, the debate about the Triskel is laughable. OCP gave the use of
    space free of charge for a year. Do you have any idea how much money could have been made by not doing this? You may wiew it as "seizing", but I'm sure the people at Triskel would be more than complimentary about the help they got from OCP.

    Oh, and what are those "many more examples"?

    Look, he's a business man, and a good one at that. But he hasn't sprouted horns and cloven feet yet! Try to retain some sense of perspective.


  • Registered Users Posts: 776 ✭✭✭ Judes


    I'm back in Cork 7 years now having returned from London. Yes, the current development taking place is exciting and necessary - but at the same time, what the hell is happening to CORK. We're in danger of turning into another big city without soul or personality!

    I love the Bodega, it's a nice place to meet my friends for weekend brunch and I've been doing it for years, so I was really cheesed off to read it was closing down, only a few months ago they were promoting their new Tapas range. Why can't O'Callaghan's leave the premises as a bar/restaurant.

    I'm working in the city centre and in the past 6 months - several pubs/small shops that were near my place of work have shut down - so trying to grab a sandwich/choc bar nearby is becoming more and more of a trek. And as handy as the likes of Centra/Spar shops are - I miss little shops with familiar faces that greet you with a smile - because they know who you are and you can have a chat whilst you're waiting. The one thing I'm dreading is the first sight of a Starbucks in Cork - as they seem to have taken over the world. I noticed this happening in the UK about 10 years ago, you'd go away for a weekend and no matter what part of the country you went to - every main street looked the same. And it's already started happening here.

    These Developers are turning my friends and I off planning social events in the city - and more brunches/lunches/dinners are being planned in friends homes, or more rural areas.

    As for the Bodega - R.I.P. I'm going to miss it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ chuci


    dudara wrote:
    And yet no one is willing to buy the Coal Quay bar and tear it down!
    hahaha brilliant that place is dodgey.ya its a pity the bodega is going twas a good laugh if you got a big enough crowd to go.good breakfasts.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ chuci


    oh and judes ther already is a starbucks in cork sorry to disappoint you its in the new airport terminal watch out there will be one in the city soon


  • Registered Users Posts: 776 ✭✭✭ Judes


    Yeah I know it's at the Airport - I tried to ignore its existence - I put it down to the Airport being an International Zone - that place doesn't feel like it's anything to do with Cork either, hence Starbucks can stay there. But who cares about them, I'm still trying to recover from the news that our Bodega is leaving us - sob sob!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,301 ✭✭✭ radiospan


    Anyone know if the Bodega will be open this Friday? I heard the workers are being let go around this weekend.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,733 ✭✭✭ deRanged


    according to this evenings Echo TKMaxx are interested in the site.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,149 Raskolnikov


    Judes wrote:
    The one thing I'm dreading is the first sight of a Starbucks in Cork - as they seem to have taken over the world.
    I would certainly welcome it. Hopefully it would drive that awful server of vile dishwater, Gloria Jeans, out of business.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,737 ✭✭✭✭ simu


    Grrr. I liked that place. :mad:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 573 el Bastardo


    One of the first modern bars in Cork, as I remember. Nice atmosphere, BUT also a bar that served awful beer and worse coffee. Won't miss it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 80 ✭✭✭ Darven


    really upset to hear that. just found out now. i always thought it did great business at weekend. i liked the fact they didnt feel the need to utilise the space of the high ceilings. this year ive gone for late breakfasts there on sunday a couple of times and have always enjoyed the basic grub and a pot of tea with the paper. hope the building stays as it is regardless of the rumours. needless to say id rather it became a coffee place rather than a tkmaxx!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,617 ClareBear


    Gutted. One of the few pubs in Cork I actually like.:(


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,223 pro_gnostic_8


    Tea,
    I admire your robust defence of Owen O'Callaghan. Reading it makes him seem like a paragon of virtue and altruism!
    So, I thought (in the interests of balance) that I might mention some instances of established fact and well-documented occurences that relate to the man:
    a) His development of the Quarryvale site into the Liffey Valley shopping centre that was clouded by payments to councillors (e.g. Colm McGrath)
    b) His investigation by the Flood Tribunal over dubious tax concessions he gained in the course of his Golden Island shopping development in Athlone.
    c) His payment in two tranches of 30,000 and 50,000 euro "political donations" to the Fianna Fail party circa 1994.
    4) His appearance before the Mahon Tribunal to answer allegations by T. Gilmartin.
    Now, I never intended this thread to be an Owen O'Callaghan exercise -- just that when someone is being portrayed as a patron and philanthropist I get the urge to reply.


    - do you remember cornmarket street 4/5 years ago? It was far worse than it is now. Finaly we've got some development on the eastern side (Guys) and the space to the west could do with being utilised more effectively.
    Cornmarket Street four years ago was going thru' a transitional period ............. the old giving way to the new "development". It WAS a bit grotty -- as you would expect to find in an area of flux. But I also remember Cornmarket Street thirty years ago when it was a vibrant place, full of character and atmosphere, and well served by small traders and individual pubs. (And of course there was the "Shawlies" who brought a unique Cork flavour to the table).:D

    Regarding Triskel, a cynic would think that O'Callaghan's magnanimous gesture in "loaning" the premises at 21 Lavitt's Quay coincided with his pursuit of achieving a high-profile during the City of Culture year. Some also would believe that loaning it out to Triskel served the purpose of having this premises on show for prospective purchasors/lessees. Whatever, the fact remains that he DID seize it back from Triskel.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 879 Karter Limited Temper


    Pro,
    If I have protrayed Mr. O''Callaghan as a "paragon of virtue" (which I don't believe I have) then my post was misinterpreted.

    The post was merely an effort to balance your own, rather one sided and hysterical views. It merely dealt with the issues you raised in your post.

    "loaning it out to Triskel served the purpose of having this premises on show for prospective purchasors/lessees." --honestly, do YOU even believe that?? The words straws, at and clutching spring to mind.

    Where have all the shawlies gone? Perhaps Owen O'Callaghan has kidnapped them all and is keeping them in a bunker under Mahon Point?

    There comes a point when you have to stop blaming "developers" for everything under the sun.

    Oh, and "Cornmarket Street four years ago was going thru' a transitional period ............. the old giving way to the new "development". It WAS a bit grotty -- as you would expect to find in an area of flux." -- transitional and flux, my arse- it was a sh*thole!

    http://www.corkcity.ie/ourservices/planning/cornmarket_street_localareaplan.shtml
    see here for what a bit of decent development and serious input by the City Council could do.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,201 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Faith


    Oh, I'm just broken hearted. I adored that place. I rarely went there for nights out, but I was always in there during the day.

    This is a serious blow to me :(.


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  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,494 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    Regarding Triskel, a cynic would think that O'Callaghan's magnanimous gesture in "loaning" the premises at 21 Lavitt's Quay coincided with his pursuit of achieving a high-profile during the City of Culture year. Some also would believe that loaning it out to Triskel served the purpose of having this premises on show for prospective purchasors/lessees. Whatever, the fact remains that he DID seize it back from Triskel.

    To which I raise points:

    1) So he provided a building for the Triskel to use at a time when the whole city was making a big effort to show off its cultural and artistic side, and got some publicity out of it. Why is this a bad thing? In the context of him being a businessman, a bit of publicity is a fair price in exchange for extra space in the city centre being dedicated to a gallery, given that there isn't that much space available for such uses at the moment. Yeah, it'd be nice if he handed it over permanently, but since I don't live in a land where pigs fly overhead at supersonic speeds on a daily basis, I don't get myself in a strop when this doesn't happen.

    2) He cannot be considered to have "seized" the property back from the Triskel if it was never theirs to begin with. He owned it, loaned it to them for a year, then took it back. No seizure involved, other than the one you seem to be in danger of having in your quest to make sure we all know that O'Callaghan is, at least in your personal pantheon, Satan incarnate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,223 pro_gnostic_8


    Pro,
    If I have protrayed Mr. O''Callaghan as a "paragon of virtue" (which I don't believe I have) then my post was misinterpreted.

    Tea,
    how else can I interpret it when you say "Look, he's a business man, and a good one."? "Good" = "morally excellent; virtuous" according to my dictionary. "Good" is not an adjective I would use in conjunction with Owen O'Callaghan. A whiff of unscrupulousness hangs off the man as evidenced by the testimony at the Flood and the Mahon Tribunals; the illegal payment of monies to corrupt politicians involved in voting through the Quarryvale development, the payment of very large contributions to the Fianna Fail party, etc etc. So you will excuse me if I cannot find much enthusiasm to laud his "achievements".

    Look, I'm not against development per se. I'm old, but I'm not a Luddite! (I wouldn't be here on the Intarweb if I was against modernity :p ). It's just that I prefer the city where I was born not turning into a soulless concentration of apartment blocks and shopping centres. I like pubs in a town centre, and even though I was never a patron of the Bodega I shall be sorry to see it go.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,223 pro_gnostic_8


    Fysh wrote:
    To which I raise points:
    Fysh,
    you can spin it whatever way you want, but, the fact remains that he allowed Triskel to use the premises from halfway through the City of Culture year and now has removed it from them so as to lease it out as a retail outlet.
    The man is worth over 500 million green ones -- would it hurt that much to give just a little gesture back in the shape of a small gallery instead of giving us apartment blocks and shopping centres.

    True, "Satan incarnate" he may not be ......... but neither is he a Carnegie or a Crawford whose gifts to the city are still very much in evidence to this day.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,494 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    Fysh,
    you can spin it whatever way you want, but, the fact remains that he allowed Triskel to use the premises from halfway through the City of Culture year and now has removed it from them so as to lease it out as a retail outlet.
    The man is worth over 500 million green ones -- would it hurt that much to give just a little gesture back in the shape of a small gallery instead of giving us apartment blocks and shopping centres.

    True, "Satan incarnate" he may not be ......... but neither is he a Carnegie or a Crawford whose gifts to the city are still very much in evidence to this day.


    Dude. Someone else made the point that the guy is a good businessman, meaning "good in the field of business". You've promptly had some sort of aneurysm at the notion that not everyone else sees in him the myriad flaws you do, to the point of claiming that because a given good deed of his didnt measure up to the frankly ludicrous standards you claim to expect of anyone who has money, he's evil.

    It would help if you accept that not everyone is going to see him like you do. Note that I have at no point suggested he's going to be made a saint for his actions; I just pointed out that the Triskel probably appreciated the free gaff for a year. Yes, they might have appreciated it more if it had been for longer, but they'd also have been stuck if he had not given it to them at all. There's the whiff of an axe being ground in this thread, and it's coming from your posts...


  • Administrators Posts: 33,524 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ dudara


    The Bodega had its good and bad points, but the truth is that it will be a big loss to Cork.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,222 ✭✭✭ run_Forrest_run


    it's sad to see a nice decent pub go, not that I am against development & progress but why get rid of a very unique place? There are lots of other places in the city that could do with a meeting with the demolition ball..the city is looking very run down and grotty in my opinion..yes the Patrick's street & Grand Parade upgrade helps but other areas of the city look awful. Why couldn't the property developers see potential in those areas and make a new 'Temple bar' success story (without actually creating another Temple Bar that is!).


  • Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭✭ ivuernis


    I was talking to the bar staff there last night and the Bodega will now be staying open for one more week until Fri 16th Feb so get there while you still can!

    Whatever one’s opinion of the clientele or atmosphere in the Bodega there’s no denying that aesthetically it is one of the most beautiful contemporary bars not just in Cork but in Ireland and its conversion into a retail outlet will be a retrograde step.

    I for one will miss it and will ad it the increasing list of Cork institutions I enjoyed so much but that have ceased to be in recent years...

    Sir Henry's
    Lobby Bar
    Capitol Cinema
    Half Moon Club
    Telefunkin in the Metropole
    Lebowski's
    Southern Soul & Disco Festival
    Radio Friendly
    Triskel Cinematek


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 342 ✭✭ JaneHudson


    One more week! Nooooooooooooo!!! I only found out last week that they do pancakes! I need more time!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 97 ✭✭✭ kcphoto


    It seems to me that the owners of the Bodega are more to blame for selling than the person who's offered to buy it.
    Unless the owners are seriously in debt, or the bar was losing money, then they could have said no to the offer and carry on as they were. If they cared enough about their bar as a landmark in cork (as many of us here do), if they cared enough to protect their building and had loyalty to staff and customers, they just could have said no to the offer. I liked the Bodega, it is a great meeting place and venue with a unique atmosphere (mainly due to the wide open space and high ceiling), but I won't be going back in for a nostalgic pint this week, surely thats only endorsing their decision to sell !


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  • Site Banned Posts: 5,904 parsi


    Slowly but surely the character will be squezzed out of the city and it will be just like any other city.I'm sure if the developers felt that there was money to be made out of straightening Patrick St they would.

    Con are almost definite to move and all of a sudden their pitches will be replaced with 12 acres of bloddy apartments. Have a look at the ones on Boreenmanna road - they are shockingly plain.


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