Advertisement
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Too soon after quitting drinking?

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,353 ✭✭✭ peckerhead


    Wonder if anyone has any advice on quitting smoking after only a few months off the demon drink (and all other mind-altering substances...)?

    I quit drinking 5 months ago today, basically because I'd become an alcoholic. I attend AA meetings twice a week and, much to my surprise as an atheist, am finding them very helpful. Particularly the 'one day at a time' thing. I've also been making a lot of changes in my thinking and behaviour — without becoming a 'different person' :p — and am genuinely starting to enjoy sobriety as opposed to feeling deprived of something. Clearer head, coping better with life's little headfúcks, etc., etc.

    I've been thinking of trying to apply some of the same principles to quitting a 25-year, 20-rollies-a-day habit that I'm really sick of but still enslaved to. However, when I mention it to other recovering alkies (many of whom smoke a lot), they tend to kinda raise their eyebrows and say things like 'one thing at a time/don't put your recovery at risk', etc.

    Any views or advice, particularly from people who've been in the same boat or know others in a similar situation? When I do it, I plan to go cold turkey. I'm holding off for a few weeks more, simply because of work pressures/family considerations — I know I'll feel like sh1t and be like an rat with everyone around me, and I'd like to pick a 'good week' to do it, maybe mid-February or so. But I don't want to put it off much longer, and I'll set myself a date. In the meantime, I'm trying to wean myself gradually so it'll be a little less of a shock to the system (..?), and establish a pattern of exercise/walking/healthier eating, etc. to motivate myself. Anything else I can do?


Comments



  • I haven't been in your position so I can't specifically recommend what to do, but I'd give Allen Carr's Easy Way to Stop Smoking book a try. I'm reading it at the moment and many people have said it works. You have nothing to lose by reading it. That way you don't have to make a decision, reading the book might make it for you. And if, when you finish the book you decide not to quit, at least you gave it a chance. Good luck!




  • Just thought I'd give an update since I finished reading the book yesterday. Seems to be working as I have not wanted a smoke since finishing it.




  • Cheers, NT, well done and best of luck!

    Hope to be following in your footsteps before too long; had two sick kids on my hands the last few days so the timing was just all wrong for me. I know I could wait forever for a 'good week to quit', though... :o




  • For what its worth, I also highly recommend allan carrs book. It worked for myself, and my father and countless other people I know.

    I read it a couple of times. The first time failed because I went out on the piss one night, and had one. And was back on 20 a day within 2 weeks.

    So the second time, I gave up drinking about 2 weeks beforehand and this really made sure that I was always in total control and able to follow the directions in the book.

    As native tongue said, you really have nothing to lose by reading it, its only about 140 pages. But i swear, after so many failed cold turkey attempts myself, once you actually want to give up and are committed, it is unbeievably easy with this book. Enjoyable even!

    Best of luck with it. Keep us posted




  • The first time failed because I went out on the piss one night, and had one. And was back on 20 a day within 2 weeks.
    At least I don't have to worry about that — well, as long as I stay off the drink! Don't want to get complacent about that for one minute...

    Have to admit I'm not looking forward to doing without coffee, though. I know it's advisable to steer clear of it (and other 'triggers') in the early days, but I reckon my poor old system is going to suffer a terrible shock!

    Actually, I have a copy of the Allan Carr book — my sister gave it to me years ago. I read the introductory part, up until where he says 'and when you finish this book, you'll never smoke another cigarette' (or words to that effect). Then I closed it and put it away for another day!

    Soon. Very soon...:o Maybe when I hit the six-months-dry day — 11 February. A Sunday. Hmmm....


  • Advertisement


  • peckerhead wrote:
    At least I don't have to worry about that — well, as long as I stay off the drink! Don't want to get complacent about that for one minute...

    Have to admit I'm not looking forward to doing without coffee, though. I know it's advisable to steer clear of it (and other 'triggers') in the early days, but I reckon my poor old system is going to suffer a terrible shock!

    Actually, I have a copy of the Allan Carr book — my sister gave it to me years ago. I read the introductory part, up until where he says 'and when you finish this book, you'll never smoke another cigarette' (or words to that effect). Then I closed it and put it away for another day...!

    Soon. Very soon...:o

    Yeah my father and grandmother both couldn't read the book because they didn't feel they were ready to stop smoking. When you think you want to stop, give the book a shot. He encourages you to keep smoking while you're reading the book which might make it easier (I stopped 2 weeks before reading the book, but it got rid of my cravings completely).

    With the Allen Carr method there are no such things as triggers, so don't worry about coffee. I've drank plenty of tea and coffee, gone out for meals and attended social events since reading the book and haven't gotten one craving. With this method, acknowledging something as a trigger is just our brain telling us that it will make us want to smoke, alas giving us one more reason to go back on them. Many of my closest friends, and my father, are smokers, and I can be standing in a smoke-filled room with them and still not crave a cigarette.

    All this said it is early days for me (day 16 now) but I'm confident that I'm a non-smoker now, and I think that's the main ingredient. When you finish reading the book the only thing you have to do is make the decision that you are never going to smoke again. I know making that decision will be more difficult in your circumstances, but if you really want to quit you can do it!

    Best of luck, and let us know how it goes!




  • first off, well done on quitting drinking. i'm still a slave to it, but hope to quit tomorrow.
    as for the smoking, i would imagine it being easier without the looseness that alcohol affords up, but still not easy all the same.

    keep us updated.


Advertisement