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Hiberno-English Lexicon

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  • 23-10-2006 10:52am
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 2,579 ✭✭✭


    I'd be shocked if none of you had seen this before, but for pure entertainment value it's a nice way of introducing people to "pop" etymology/linguistics :)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiberno-English
    # Nohjis - Twisted version of odious. Often used with the word 'fierce. 'The craic last night was nohjis fierce'. Common in Cavan.
    # Keeping sketch describes keeping a lookout for teachers, gardaí, parents etc. "Sketch!" is shouted if someone is coming. The term may derive from the Irish sceith meaning "to inform on".
    # Gob****e refers to a fool, someone who talks nonsense, or sometimes someone who is gullible.
    # Gombeen originally referred to a usurer (from the Irish gaimbín, diminutive of "lump"), but now refers to any underhand or corrupt activity.# Handy has more meanings in Hiberno-Irish than just "useful": it usually also means "great", "terrific". It is also used to describe a person's skill at a particular task; "Paul is pretty handy with a golf club" meaning "Paul is a good golfer".
    # Head-the-ball Dublin. A nutcase. From 'Hae'ball king of the beggars', a famous character in Dublin c.1760.
    # Hiace (as in Toyota Hiace) is used by many to refer to any light commercial van, much like "Transit" or "Transit van" (as in Ford Transit) in the UK.
    # Hoor - meaning whore. 'She's an awful wee hoor so she is!' Also means "rogue" or "scoundrel" (as in "cute hoor") - often affectionately rather than pejoratively. Possibly from hougher, a hamstringer.[citation needed]
    # Jackeen - A derogatory countryman's name for a Dubliner. From the small British union flags ('union jacks')waved by thousands for royal visits up to 1910.
    # Jacks : toilet, usually in a pub or similar. As in "mind my handbag while I go to the jacks". From 16th century English "Jakes". (mind means "look after") the words Bog and Loo are also used.
    # Janey Mac! is an exclamation of amazement or frustration in Dublin. It comes from an old children's rhyme: "Janey Mac, me shirt is black, what'll I do for Sunday?/Go to bed, cover your head and don't get up til Monday!"
    # Jaykers - A euphemism for Jesus; used as expression of amazement.
    # Jaysis - See Jaykers. Often used in the sentence 'Sweet Be-Jaysis'. Common in rural areas.


Comments

  • Administrators, Entertainment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 18,727 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭hullaballoo


    I'm not sure how much faith I'd put in the accuracy of some of those definitions, but an interesting read alright.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,657 Mod ✭✭✭✭Faith


    I told my (British) friend to keep sketch the other day, and she looked at me like I had two heads.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2 Jenb


    Interesting!


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 10,247 Mod ✭✭✭✭flogen


    Faith wrote:
    I told my (British) friend to keep sketch the other day, and she looked at me like I had two heads.

    that's nothing; when I was living in England I realised they didn't use the word 'press' to describe a place you keep things in (as in 'the plates are in the press')... English people I spoke to would look at me wierd if I used that term, they prefer the word 'cupboard', which is stupid and long.

    There were also a multitude of ice-creams they'd never heard of (like Freaky Foots, Loop the Loops etc.), which was kind of sad.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,238 ✭✭✭Kwekubo


    Professor Terry Dolan (of the NewsTalk etymology podcast) is building a very detailed dictionary of Hiberno-Irish at http://www.hiberno-english.com/, sort of like an online version of his dictionary of HE.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 41,926 ✭✭✭✭_blank_


    flogen wrote:
    that's nothing; when I was living in England I realised they didn't use the word 'press' to describe a place you keep things in (as in 'the plates are in the press')... English people I spoke to would look at me wierd if I used that term, they prefer the word 'cupboard', which is stupid and long.
    Jaysis, I hated that.

    I use most of the words in the OP on a regular basis, apart from Nohjis. It looks like the name of a Native American tribe.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,657 Mod ✭✭✭✭Faith


    flogen wrote:
    that's nothing; when I was living in England I realised they didn't use the word 'press' to describe a place you keep things in (as in 'the plates are in the press')... English people I spoke to would look at me wierd if I used that term, they prefer the word 'cupboard', which is stupid and long.

    I tested this out yesterday and asked my English friends if they knew what I meant when I said "Take the cup out of the press". One of them valiently replied "Yeah, you mean take it out of the hotpress!" Silly people.


  • Registered Users Posts: 741 ✭✭✭Stripey Cat


    Kwekubo wrote: »
    Professor Terry Dolan (of the NewsTalk etymology podcast) is building a very detailed dictionary of Hiberno-Irish at http://www.hiberno-english.com/, sort of like an online version of his dictionary of HE.


    The link to the archive doesn't work anymore.

    Does anyone know of a way of accessing it?


    I'm looking for a derivation of "keep sketch".


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,220 Mod ✭✭✭✭slowburner


    A Cavan friend of mine said that Ohjis was common - he had never heard Nohjis used.


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