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Does anyone regret voting for the Good Friday Agreement in 1998?

  • 15-10-2021 10:36pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,597 ✭✭✭ tdf7187


    Personally I do. In hindsight, we should not have deleted Articles 2 and 3 from our Constitution. It was too much of a concession to make to the people who can't decide if they're Irish or British.

    I do not favour reunification of our national territory using violent means, I would consider that counter-productive. We all know that the Provos failed to achieve re-unification in spite of a 30 year bombing and shooting campaign.



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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 282 ✭✭ O'Neill


    Eurgh...what's the point...



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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    No regrets. But the way the British are dealing with Brexit suggests to me we don;t have to take any agreement with them seriously



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,903 ✭✭✭ John Doe1


    I am describing how your average unionist in say Carrickfergus or Bangor would see ROI, There are parts of NI which have very little interaction with Irish culture and would absolutely see ROI as a foreign nation.

    There a million unionists in NI, they are not just Irishmen pretending to be British, they are genetically and culturally closer to the neighbouring island.

    It is like telling a Turkish Cypriot that they are Greek Cypriot just because they have happen to share the same island.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,388 ✭✭✭ Nermal


    If the UK triggers article 16 of the NIP, we should consider the agreement repudiated and hold a referendum on the re-insertion Articles 2 & 3.



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,747 CMod ✭✭✭✭ ancapailldorcha


    As a fellow Ulster Protestant (now expat), I couldn't agree more. Not much to add but it's a bit unnerving to see this kind of rhetoric where you've people supporting a foreign bad actor over the welfare of their own nation.

    Nobody in Northern Ireland can't decide if they're Irish or British. Everyone I've met from there identifies as Irish including my own staunchly Protestant family from Donegal. Anyone feeling British feels British. There's no indecisiveness in this regard.

    Anyone looking to undermine it because it's somehow impeding the trainwreck that is Brexit isn't worth listening to IMO. Imagine selling out your own nation because of the fools and bigots governing the UK.

    We sat again for an hour and a half discussing maps and figures and always getting back to that most damnable creation of the perverted ingenuity of man - the County of Tyrone.

    H. H. Asquith



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭ OneEightSeven


    I would have voted against it because of the birthright citizenship loophole it created.



  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ Cassius99


    Possibly not the greatest example to use. Having lived and worked in Cyprus I've found that most Cypriots, regardless of ethnicity want to refer to themselves as just that - Cypriot. It's only outside influences that have emphasized the Greek Cypriot/Turkish Cypriot divide in the communities.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,304 ✭✭✭✭ Fr Tod Umptious


    Lucky for you then you got your say on that in 2004.



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,304 ✭✭✭✭ Fr Tod Umptious


    I was in a furniture shopin the Waterside of Derry a number of years ago and the sales person had no concept of where Galway was when I asked them about delivery to the republic.

    Equally I was chatting with some people in a unionist town in north Down and they too had no real grasp of the geography of the republic and things like that.

    It's a foreign country to them.

    And I'm fine with that.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 27,058 ✭✭✭✭ freshpopcorn


    I'm nearly 29 and grew up in Cork so clearly I didn't vote for it but I believe I would have voted in favor of it.

    However I would know a few lads who'd be against it who'd be my age going by stuff they'd say. It's mainly from stuff they read online.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭ dudley72




  • Registered Users Posts: 20,798 ✭✭✭✭ Strumms


    1000% this... it might not have been a perfect solution but it saved thousands of lives...

    id vote for it again.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭ dudley72


    This is the problem with some political parties trying to change history and spin a new agenda. What happened and what is been told happened are two totally different things if you listen to some people.

    The problem is people believe the bulls**t that is been spun. It was a study done in US, I can't remember the exact percentage but a bulls**t story was more likely to be shared and spread than what actually happened. It really is a disgrace



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,847 ✭✭✭ paul71


    I've heard that comment is attributed to Edmund Burke but never found a reiable source to verify it, do you know if its origins were with Burke Ancapaildorcha?



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,523 ✭✭✭ Tork


    I grew up listening to those news bulletins too and even to this day, when I hear certain place names in Northern Ireland, they remind me of atrocities. When I was a kid in the late 80s, my family travelled to the north. I clearly remember armed soldiers walking along the high street of the town we were in and our car being stopped at some point. The GFA isn't perfect but I don't think any solution would have been. The worst side effect of it has been the near annihilation of the SDLP and UUP in favour of Sinn Fein and the DUP. The DUP in particular is doing the north no favours but that's a matter for another thread.



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,747 CMod ✭✭✭✭ ancapailldorcha


    I know it's a misquote and that's about it, unfortunately.

    We sat again for an hour and a half discussing maps and figures and always getting back to that most damnable creation of the perverted ingenuity of man - the County of Tyrone.

    H. H. Asquith



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭ dudley72


    Neither SF or the DUP are doing anything in the North. If you kicked both parties out you would have a lot more progress in the 20+ years. Both of those parties prefer to spend years bickering with each other and doing absolutely nothing. Imagine shutting down the government for 3 years and both parties sat at home on full pay. Disgraceful



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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,968 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    Gas how some people cant recognise or admit that Northern Ireland and ROI are two different countries. Really folks......



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