Irish Crime and Punishment - Executions, irish justice,gallows, folk lore. - boards.ie
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19-06-2010, 12:48   #1
CDfm
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Irish Crime and Punishment - Executions, irish justice,gallows, folk lore.

There are always goodies and baddies and one thing that always gets me is that Irish history always gets defined by the "struggle for independence " when there was a lot more to life.

So after reading about the execution of Ronnie Lee Gardner by firing squad in Utah yesterday made it an ideal time for a salacious themed thread about the subject.

Its not intended to be a judgemental or even politically correct or rigidly factual so a bit of folklore and ducking stools are welome too.

So I will kick off with a few.In 1640 the Bishop of Waterford and Lismore , John Atherton was convicted of buggery and executed under a law he had campaigned for



Quote:
As the Bishop of Waterford and Lismore, Atherton successfully campaigned for the passage of an act that instituted the death penalty for the vice of buggery. In 1640, he became one of the first men accused under this statute.
A lawyer named Butler, involved in a dispute with the bishop over the ownership of some land at Killoges, near Waterford, made a complaint to Parliament in which he accused Atherton of committing buggery with his steward and tithe proctor John Childe. The bishop strongly denied this specific charge, but Childe confessed

On the morning of his execution, Atherton declared himself unworthy of the Communion of the Dead, though he had written his wife that he expected to see her in Heaven. As he prepared for transport, the bishop sought to have his arms pinioned to his sides with a black ribbon, but the sheriff insisted on using the cheap cord typically reserved for common criminals.
Atherton was hanged on Gallows Green on December 5, 1640. At ten o'clock that night, he was buried in a far corner of the yard at Christ Church in a place where some rubbish used to be cast and where no one else lay.
His partner in sodomy, Childe, was hanged at Bandon Bridge in March 1641

http://www.glbtq.com/social-sciences/atherton_j.html

Before Stephens Green was a park it was even a leper colony. It was also a place of public execution. So who died there and why.Under what laws.

ALL other major towns, Kilkenny, Carlow etc had executions, floggings, brandings, public amputations etc and even a Mayor of Galway is supposed to have been the hangman for his own son.
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19-06-2010, 16:04   #2
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Hangings of 4 pirates on Stephens Green in 1766 .A Nugget on Stephens Green but I seem to remember seeing something on the north side of the Green mentioning the execution of a teenage girl there for stealing a dress or something. Real bloody azzizes stuff.


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The west side of Stephen's Green, or Rapparee Fields, as it was called, was not built upon until the beginning of this century. There was a prejudice felt against it, as it was thought that at one time it was a place of execution for criminals, Gallows Hill being in close proximity to it. It would seem very doubtful that any executions took place during the latter half of the last century; as we have seen, the inhabitants of the Green were of the very upper-ten, "smart people," who would never have suffered such an indignity in their neighbourhood. [This prejudice continued until within the last thirty or forty years; the reason was forgotten, but the evil reputation still clung to the locality.] Moreover, the official "hanging-places" were either Kilmainham (where Emmet was hanged), or Baggotrath (Baggot's Castle), which then stood in the centre of pasturelands and quarries. Hither came the criminals from Newgate Prison in Cornmarket. The procession of these miserable wretches passed through Rapparee Fields, skirting the Beaux' Walk on the north side of the Green, passed the burial-ground in Merrion Row, and so reached Baggotrath, on the site of which the Convent of the Sisters of Mercy now stands, the pasturelands being converted into Baggot Street.
[The Gentleman's Magazine mentions the execution of four pirates taking place in Stephen's Green in 1776; but this has been found to be an error, the date of the pirates' execution being 1766, and the place Baggotrath Castle" (Gaskin's "Irish Varieties"). Mr. FitzPatrick in his "Sham Squire" fixes Stephen's Green as the place of execution of Mrs. Llewellyn in 1796. This is manifestly an error. The same writer gives a list of executions said to have taken place in the Green.]
[One of the broadsides of the day attacking the Provost of Trinity College, Hely Hutchinson, runs:
Oh, I'll go to Stephen's Green in a cart, in a cart,
Pressed down with age and sin,
With a tuck beneath my chin.]
http://www.chaptersofdublin.com/book...cturesque6.htm

Last edited by CDfm; 19-06-2010 at 16:07.
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19-06-2010, 17:06   #3
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The Walking Gallows

'The walking gallows'

Jack Hepenstal was a lieutenent in the Irish Yeomanry, who earned himself the nickname of "The Walking Gallows" at the time of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. A smiling giant of a man, Lt Hepenstal would roam about the countryside seizing any stray peasant whom he suspected might be a rebel. He would take off his silk cravat, and with the aid of a companion use it to string up his victim behind his back, after which he would ‘trot about with his burden like jolting carthorse’ until the man was dead. After Jack Hepenstal's death in 1802, some wag wrote for him the following epitaph: “Here lie the bones of Hepenstal; Judge, jury, gallows, rope and all” This epitaph, used metaphorically, is still quoted today to emphasise the importance of separating the legislature from the executive.

Following the death of Jack's brother George Hepenstal in 1805, his sister-in-law Hester Hepenstal, nee Watson, married Dr Patrick Duigenan, the Irish politician famous for his rabid anti-Catholic opinions. It is only because of Sir Jonah Barrington's reminiscences of Dr Patrick Duigenan in 'Historic Memoirs of Ireland'(1833) that we have the description of Lt Jack Hepenstal's barbaric practices at the time of the Irish Rebellion.

Return to Heppenstall One-Name Study Main Page here

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mellor2...Hepenstal.html
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19-06-2010, 17:59   #4
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This link here gives Gallows Hill as near Upper Baggot Street

http://books.google.ie/books?id=WOSa...dublin&f=false

Does anyone know where??

I imagine there are a few places dotted around Ireland called Gallows Hill or Green.

I found a great link here for Dublin

http://kilmainham.blogspot.com/2006/...1783-1796.html

You even had a few burnings like Mary Purfield in 1783

Stephens Green & Newgate for the City and Kilmainham for the County

Last edited by CDfm; 19-06-2010 at 18:26.
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20-06-2010, 21:40   #5
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Kilkennys Gallows Location

.
Quote:

<H2>Matts Story


Kilkenny the medieval capital of Ireland stands in the light of the majestic Kilkenny castle. In years gone by all castles had their own mills which were served by local peasants, who would turn their crops in to their landlord in lieu of rent. These crops were delivered daily to a young miller called Matt who ran the Mill at it's present site of John's bridge.
Now young Matt was an enterprising young lad, he kept the best of barley one side to develop his own home brew. As the years went by so Matt's brew grew stronger and more popular, and he opened his own tavern in the mill.
Condemned men were lead to the gallows below Greensbridge, and their last stop was Matt's tavern, it was said many of Kilkenny's most infamous thieves and rogues had their last request granted of fresh fish from the adjoining River Nore, a loaf of home-made soda bread and a jug of Matt's ale.
As the story goes twice a year the ghost of Matt is seen in the cellar bar of Matt the Millers, just to be sure the finest of brews are still being served to the condemned rogues and thieves of Kilkenny!
</H2>
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30-06-2010, 15:21   #6
Eamonster
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place of execution

I was looking at Rocque's map of Dublin 1759 and the gallows is at the crossroads of Baggot and Fitzwilliam street (or thereabouts).

I must have a look for the graveyard in Merrion Row, because that's where Darkey (or Dorcas) Kelly was buried back in the 1760s.
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30-06-2010, 17:42   #7
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Originally Posted by Eamonster View Post

I must have a look for the graveyard in Merrion Row, because that's where Darkey (or Dorcas) Kelly was buried back in the 1760s.
Who was Darkey Kelly ??
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30-06-2010, 19:22   #8
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Darkey Kelly

You'll find her on page 80 in this link. Not much is known about her...

http://www.archive.org/stream/irelan...h/darkey+kelly

Darkey Kelly's Pub is built on the site of her brothel, The Maiden Tower opposite Christ Church.

But apparantly, after she was burnt alive, her body was taken to Merrion. That could be either the Huguenot Graveyard in Merrion Row, or possibly a graveyard up in Mount Merrion.
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30-06-2010, 20:50   #9
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Cork Executions

Nice one Eamonster -

Here is a list for cork executions in the 18 & 19th century and while some are reloatively minor like linen & stocking theft most show up what you would expect.

http://geocitiessites.com/corklh/executions1.html
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30-06-2010, 23:09   #10
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The execution of Walter Lynch by his dad the Warden of Galway.

Maybe the word lynching came from this but tradition has it that in the year 1624 a Mayor of Galway personally hanged his own son.

Read a penny dreadful account here

http://www.libraryireland.com/articl...1-29/index.php

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03-07-2010, 15:48   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CDfm View Post
This link here gives Gallows Hill as near Upper Baggot Street

http://books.google.ie/books?id=WOSa...dublin&f=false

Does anyone know where??

I imagine there are a few places dotted around Ireland called Gallows Hill or Green.

I found a great link here for Dublin

http://kilmainham.blogspot.com/2006/...1783-1796.html

You even had a few burnings like Mary Purfield in 1783

Stephens Green & Newgate for the City and Kilmainham for the County
There was one in Carrick on Shannon. Think the name may have been changed due to housing development or whatever, but quiet a few men were hung there after 1798.
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04-07-2010, 16:59   #12
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Murcod Ballagh was guiollotined near Merton wherever that is and I started a thread once hoping to learn more.

Incidentally, an Irishman developed the standard drop method for execution by hanging known as the Haughton Drop and he was Samuel Haughton from Carlow.
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05-07-2010, 03:32   #13
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Originally Posted by PatsytheNazi View Post
There was one in Carrick on Shannon. Think the name may have been changed due to housing development or whatever, but quiet a few men were hung there after 1798.
Did we have Bloody Azzizes here ? How was criminal justice adminstered.?

What was gaelic justice like ?
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05-07-2010, 21:07   #14
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There was more than one George Best you know and one was the Captain of a ship the Caswell on which there was a mutiny.
There is a link here with lots of crime stuff
http://irishcriminology.com/05a.html
But look out for the correspondence between the Hangman William Marwood and the Governor of Cork Jail in 1876 over the execution.
http://irishcriminology.com/05a.html
An aside after independence there was no official irish Hangman and when an execution was to be carried out it wasusual to hire the British Hangmen and thats what happened from Independence in 1922 until the aboloition of Capital Punishment in the 1960's.
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For a country surrounded by water there is little or no theme in Irishcriminology which addresses that fact. Seldom does one, therefore, run across a murder or a mutiny that was played out on the local stage, as it were. Sea-faring murders and exploits , it seems, belong to a shadowy history that no one quite remembers past the mention of Brien Boru and the Danes at Clontarf.
Imagine my surprise, then, when I discovered this beauty in the National Archives. I felt an immediate compulsion to see it through, gather what papers there were available on it, and record it. My only regret was that the Archives could not produce the original map and sketch which was presented at the first trial; and no matter how I sought to find it – for it must be there, somewhere – nothing was forthcoming.Fortunately, as can be seen from the following extracts, an image of the real Caswell (which occupies pride of place on the book cover)as well as images of the dramatis personae, were retrievable from all kinds of unlikely places ,and with the assistance of several of those herein acknowledged.Out of small references, therefore, the story led on to two major mutiny trials in Cork in the mid-1870s – the first into the behaviour of Emmanuel Bombos, a young Greek, and, the second into the part played by Joseph Pistoria, a Sicilian. These trials afforded us some rare accounts of nineteenth century executions, and account of the attitudes of the public – the people of Cork particularly -- to the fate of the unfortunate offenders.There is no disguising the brutality of the mutiny or the ferocity of the counter-mutiny. Nevertheless, they cannot be dislocated from the prevailing attitudes of sailors at the time, or the prevailing attitudes to sailors, especially Greeks and Turkish sailors. Neither can the personality of Captain George Best be left out of the equation. In an extended Introduction I have tried to deal with the historical aspects of these ‘roles’, fully aware of the fact that words cannot replace actions.What follows here is a Synopsis, Acknowledgements, and an Introduction to the story of The Riddle of The Caswell Mutiny.
Birching for children was still used in Ireland until at least 1943 .

Quote:
<H5>News Chronicle, London, 22 October 1943
Quote:

Four boys to be whipped - one of them twice


Ordering four boys aged from 11½ to 13 to be birched for thefts and housebreaking at Dundalk, Ulster, yesterday, District Justice Goff directed that one lad should receive 6 strokes on each of two days, and the others 6 strokes each.
He added: "There is a lot of spurious sympathy being spouted about birching boys. It might do good to some adults if birching was extended to them as well." As to juveniles, he suggested that the birch should be applied "fairly heavily" and that the parents and an NSPCC inspector should be present.
Beating or birching of Children as a sentencing option on a Crimimal Conviction was on the statute books until 1997


http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m.../ai_n13810111/


So what was the criminal justice system like in Ireland ???

Last edited by CDfm; 05-07-2010 at 21:12.
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06-07-2010, 14:35   #15
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Marwood's business card on display in Kilmainham.

List of executions in Ireland in the 19th century

http://www.capitalpunishmentuk.org/ir1835.html

Last edited by oncevotedff; 06-07-2010 at 15:12.
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