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19-04-2010, 12:12   #1
Grizzly 45
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Historical gun for sale today

From todays Indo...
In Mealys auctions today

Major John Mac Bride's .44 Webley Patent Revolver Pistol, manufactured Under Licence by Rigby & Sons, Dublin. This pistol was left in for repair at Lamberts, Hatch St., Dublin, prior to Easter week 1916, by Major Mc Bride, he never collected it and it was not returned to him. Estimated selling price: € 600 - 900


Wonder is it a DEACT,or what Good Reason you could put down to posses it ??Be a crying shame if it is reduced to a non firing lump of metal
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19-04-2010, 13:09   #2
rowa
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lovely webley , the estimated price seems very low though.
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19-04-2010, 14:23   #3
meathstevie
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There's heaps of Webleys around Ireland, especially Northern Ireland, and the UK if someone wishes to buy one hence the price.
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19-04-2010, 14:47   #4
Grizzly 45
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Apart from the historical perspective of it.Does the fact that it was a liscensed version made by Rigby in Dublin add any value to it?
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19-04-2010, 15:02   #5
rowa
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Apart from the historical perspective of it.Does the fact that it was a liscensed version made by Rigby in Dublin add any value to it?
I know rigby are still going strong today , obviously not in gun unfriendly ireland , but i thought the gun might have been of interest to wealthy irish-american collectors as it would be of interest to them on several levels.
Webleys seem to fetch very high prices in the states and those with any sort of proveable history even more so, added to that the fact that they wouldn't have to go crawling to some unaccountable public servant for a licence and i would certainly think it would be going abroad.

http://www.johnrigbyandco.com/html/history.html

http://www.johnrigbylondon.com/index2.html

Last edited by rowa; 19-04-2010 at 15:06.
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19-04-2010, 15:06   #6
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On the historical guns we can't own note, I found a centenary model Browning Hi Power on gunbroker.com last night. Lovely. Ornate without being too tacky. However, I couldn't buy it on the understanding that it would be decommissioned. That would be wrong to me.
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19-04-2010, 16:34   #7
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Does the hammer look like it's sitting back a bit there?
Could very well be butchered already.
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19-04-2010, 19:19   #8
rowa
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Does the hammer look like it's sitting back a bit there?
Could very well be butchered already.
half cock maybe ?
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19-04-2010, 21:35   #9
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Provenance is everything. Condition is very helpful, but less than perfect condition can be outweighed by strong provenance. I agree with Rowa, the guide price seems low.

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20-04-2010, 04:18   #10
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There's heaps of Webleys around Ireland, especially Northern Ireland, and the UK if someone wishes to buy one hence the price.
That's beside the point. It's not the modle but rather the owner thats gives its value. very low imo.
I found it a little funny that they felt it important to mention it was never returned to him, they could hardly walk into Kilmainham and hand it to him.

Mac Bride was a key figure in the rising. He also fought in the Boer war. When facing the firing squad in Killmainham he decline a blindfold and said something like;

"I have looked down the muzzles of too many guns in the Boer war to fear death, now please carry out your sentence"


Obviously his son was even more so historically significant. AFAIK, the family has all since passed away.

Last edited by Mellor; 20-04-2010 at 04:30.
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20-04-2010, 10:18   #11
pedroeibar1
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Obviously his son was even more so historically significant. AFAIK, the family has all since passed away.
Sean McB had two children, Tiernan, who was a film-maker and a daughter. Tiernan died in the mid 1990s. I don't know about the daughter.

Anyone hear what the revolver went for?

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21-04-2010, 03:21   #12
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I knew his son died, buried together in Glasnevin. I wasn't aware that he had a daughter. If she was still alive I hope she was aware of the sale.

I'd be interested in the final price also.
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21-04-2010, 19:52   #13
meathstevie
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That's beside the point. It's not the modle but rather the owner thats gives its value. very low imo.
I found it a little funny that they felt it important to mention it was never returned to him, they could hardly walk into Kilmainham and hand it to him.

Mac Bride was a key figure in the rising. He also fought in the Boer war. When facing the firing squad in Killmainham he decline a blindfold and said something like;

"I have looked down the muzzles of too many guns in the Boer war to fear death, now please carry out your sentence"


Obviously his son was even more so historically significant. AFAIK, the family has all since passed away.

It does matter to an extent, if it would have been a rather unusual weapon with the same history it would have been valued a good bit more. Obviously the man's historical importance stands on it's own whether he had a Webley or a Luger or a Colt.
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22-04-2010, 00:46   #14
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That's not what I said. I never said that the rarity doesn't matter. I said that the value (in this case only) comes from the history. Hence, I expected it to be higher. The listed price was a steal imo. If I was at home I'd buy it.

Obviously, if it was a one of a kind custom piece this adds to the history value, I doubt anyone disagrees.
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22-04-2010, 01:13   #15
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Someone said webleys are common in ireland and that is true , but the victorian and edwardian era revolvers and semi-autos are very sought after by collectors and something like the webley-fosbery revolver is a real find ,
Most webleys around are the later ex military second world war stuff and are not very scarce.
Just hope whoever bought it didn't have to have it deactivated like the tolkien revolver had to be before it was put on display.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/server/show/nav.00o00200h
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