Dangerous sharks in Ireland? - boards.ie
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15-10-2009, 18:16   #1
blackbelt
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Dangerous sharks in Ireland?

I am a regular visitor to IWDG website and I couldn't believe it when I read the information at the following link.

http://www.iwdg.ie/iscope/strandings...ls.asp?id=3435

I know we have blue sharks in the north west and parts of the west while the UK has Mako sharks but I wonder what type of shark could have done this to the dolphin?

Didn't think dolphins were at any particular threat from sharks off the Irish coast.I'd understand this to be the case off the coast of the America's,Africa and Australia where you'd have bigger sharks like Great Whites,Tiger Sharks,Bull Sharks,Hammerhead and White Tips.
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15-10-2009, 22:23   #2
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A Porbeagle scavaging might have done that. They are known to be around the coast.
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16-10-2009, 07:42   #3
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Originally Posted by Pigeon Reaper View Post
A Porbeagle scavaging might have done that. They are known to be around the coast.
are Porbeagle dangerous to humans?
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16-10-2009, 17:47   #4
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are Porbeagle dangerous to humans?
I read up about it and it has not been "incriminated" in any "unprovoked attacks".

That is not to say they wouldn't.I'd tend to agree with Pigeon Reaper that this is likely but it could be possible that larger species of sharks could be moving into Irish coastal waters.Leatherback and loggerhead turtles have been documented in Irish waters now.
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16-10-2009, 19:55   #5
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Blue, Thresher, Porbeagle, and Mako sharks have all been recorded in Irish waters. Of late we have has six gill and seven gill sharks in Irish waters, the latter being caught off of the Kerry coast and the former off of the Clare coast.



In theory every one of those could do damage to a human, with some of them more than able to kill a human.

But a bull is also more than able to kill a human and so can many dogs, in fact you would be more at risk from dogs imho.


To go back to one of the sharks I mentioned; the seven gill sharks that have been seen off the Kerry coast. These guys interest me a lot in that they are in our waters. They are one of the favourite prey species for the Great White Shark in the atlantic, and where you have one you normally get the other at some point.

Our water temps would support a GW, and to be honest, even if they were out there in the deeper waters off of our coasts, would be even notice?

I have gone cage diving to look at GWs in many places, and in many water temps, from the warmer waters of the coast of Africa to the bloody cold waters near the Farallon Islands near San Fran, so I have no doubts at all about our water temps being very tolerable for a GW.
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16-10-2009, 20:15   #6
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Something similar here, in this case it was probably a porpoise and the damage inflicted by possibly by bottlenose dolphins or post mortem by dogs or other land mammals, could not rule out a shark though.
Interesting accounts of bottlenose attacks in recent years on porpoises, they are certainly capable of aggresive behaviour at times, but in this case on a striped dolphin probably not, they target lone porpoises.




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16-10-2009, 20:26   #7
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if it was already dead it could be a large tope too.

you would get them around Shannon Estuary.

Clare used to be famous for Porbeagle Shark as well. and would be well able to kill a man, blues Shark would too (if you were out in open water they are supposed to slowly circle for ages) and large tope are said to be capable of taking your arm off.
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16-10-2009, 23:09   #8
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When the water temps are up, Tope can be found as far up the Estuary as to be level with Askeaton in County Limerick.

Have caught some beauties at Kilteery Pier in County Limerick and at Tarbert Pier in Tarbert, County Kerry.
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21-10-2009, 20:46   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kess73 View Post
Blue, Thresher, Porbeagle, and Mako sharks have all been recorded in Irish waters. Of late we have has six gill and seven gill sharks in Irish waters, the latter being caught off of the Kerry coast and the former off of the Clare coast.



In theory every one of those could do damage to a human, with some of them more than able to kill a human.

But a bull is also more than able to kill a human and so can many dogs, in fact you would be more at risk from dogs imho.


To go back to one of the sharks I mentioned; the seven gill sharks that have been seen off the Kerry coast. These guys interest me a lot in that they are in our waters. They are one of the favourite prey species for the Great White Shark in the atlantic, and where you have one you normally get the other at some point.

Our water temps would support a GW, and to be honest, even if they were out there in the deeper waters off of our coasts, would be even notice?

I have gone cage diving to look at GWs in many places, and in many water temps, from the warmer waters of the coast of Africa to the bloody cold waters near the Farallon Islands near San Fran, so I have no doubts at all about our water temps being very tolerable for a GW.
For great whites you need something like a large seal population.
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22-10-2009, 23:26   #10
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Originally Posted by nellumr View Post
For great whites you need something like a large seal population.
Like Howth?
seriously though, in recent years there have been unconfirmed sightings of great whites in Britain. However, they may be mistaken porbeagles, which are close relatives of teh great white.

I'd say great whites have been about in these parts (occasionaly) for a while now. The fact that they are gigantotherms means they can survive in cold or warm waters and there could be a reasonable food supply (seals and six gills) to sustain the occasional travelling great white.
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25-10-2009, 23:42   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nellumr View Post
For great whites you need something like a large seal population.


No for great whites you need a food source. It does not have to be seals. GWs in different parts of the planet tend to have totally different main food sources, and in the atlantic that main food source just happens to be the six gill shark as well as tuna.


We have a decent seal population in Ireland but an even bigger small dolphin population, which is something else that atlantic GWs feed upon.


Now I don't think that our coastal waters has a large popultion of great whites, but I do think that it is more than fair to say that they have been in Irish waters, and given that they are in the Atlantic, in the African waters below Ireland and in the Mediterranean sea, around Italy in particular, then it would be foolhardy to dismiss the idea of them passing through our waters given that they are living in every direction from Ireland. Some may dismiss the idea of them being able to survive North of Ireland, but some of the largest Great white populations and the some of largest specimens are found in the waters around the Farallon Islands, which has water temps far lower than in the waters above the North of this country.

They also thrive in the Australian, African, and Mexican waters where the temp is much higher.
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26-10-2009, 18:25   #12
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No for great whites you need a food source. It does not have to be seals. GWs in different parts of the planet tend to have totally different main food sources, and in the atlantic that main food source just happens to be the six gill shark as well as tuna.


We have a decent seal population in Ireland but an even bigger small dolphin population, which is something else that atlantic GWs feed upon.


Now I don't think that our coastal waters has a large popultion of great whites, but I do think that it is more than fair to say that they have been in Irish waters, and given that they are in the Atlantic, in the African waters below Ireland and in the Mediterranean sea, around Italy in particular, then it would be foolhardy to dismiss the idea of them passing through our waters given that they are living in every direction from Ireland. Some may dismiss the idea of them being able to survive North of Ireland, but some of the largest Great white populations and the some of largest specimens are found in the waters around the Farallon Islands, which has water temps far lower than in the waters above the North of this country.

They also thrive in the Australian, African, and Mexican waters where the temp is much higher.
This post really sums up the chances that they could frequent our waters or at least pass through.Ireland has a very large dolphin and porpoise population along with smaller sharks,tuna and game fish like ling and some swordfish etc.

What is to say they could not predate on large sharks such as the basking shark too.The sightings off the coast of Cornwall are more than likely mako sharks or thresher sharks but if GW sharks can live off the Farallone Islands,they could certainly live off Ireland.Not withstanding the Farallon Islands has a huge seal population.

All of this could be happening out in the Atlantic Sea off the north,west and south and off the Irish Sea without anybody knowing.
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27-10-2009, 23:50   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbelt View Post
This post really sums up the chances that they could frequent our waters or at least pass through.Ireland has a very large dolphin and porpoise population along with smaller sharks,tuna and game fish like ling and some swordfish etc.

What is to say they could not predate on large sharks such as the basking shark too.The sightings off the coast of Cornwall are more than likely mako sharks or thresher sharks but if GW sharks can live off the Farallone Islands,they could certainly live off Ireland.Not withstanding the Farallon Islands has a huge seal population.

All of this could be happening out in the Atlantic Sea off the north,west and south and off the Irish Sea without anybody knowing.



Your post is quite timely with the pictures from Australia today of the 10 foot Great White that had a huge chunk bitten out of it by what people think could be a 6m to 7m Great White.


The Farallon Islands does have a huge seal population but it also has a large whale population, is quite heavy in terms of large shoal fish, and has a large seabird population also.

Interestingly the waters around the Farallon Islands gets visited a number of times per year by large pods of Killer Whale, which generally causes the waters there to practically clear out of Great Whites.

It has to go down as my favourite spot to cage dive. I have done so in Mexico, in other parts of California, in Africa, and in Oz, but none matched the Farallon Island experience, as although I saw bigger individual sharks in African waters, there is nowhere that has such a population of consistently big Great Whites as the Farallons.

The first time you come face to face with a 17 or 18 footer through the cage, it is like being in the presence of something majestic whose size on paper does no justice to it's size up close and personal. The different personality quirks that they have make them a very interesting fish. Some are very confident, some are almost shy, some are aggressive and you know very quickly about those girls when they hit the cage.

Also when in the Farallon waters you get to see whales, seals and many other types of marine life that you would not get to see so well elsewhere.

I would love to see cage diving brought in over here, as it is a great way to spend a day, and while we cannot gaurantee a GW in our waters, we have a large amount of life on our coastlines that could be viewed from cages.
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07-11-2009, 11:21   #14
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Fascinating account of cage diving there. The question is , then, why haven't we got GWs and Orcas here. They both seem capable of migrating from northern to southern hemispheres to habitats similar to what we have here. Neither are particularly shy about being seen near the shore, so I don't believe they are out there, but only in "the deep".
Maybe its our smell.
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07-11-2009, 12:15   #15
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Fascinating account of cage diving there. The question is , then, why haven't we got GWs and Orcas here. They both seem capable of migrating from northern to southern hemispheres to habitats similar to what we have here. Neither are particularly shy about being seen near the shore, so I don't believe they are out there, but only in "the deep".
Maybe its our smell.


Ireland has a healthy population of Killer whale that pass through our waters, and even had three of them that swam up the Lee and itnto Cork city a few years ago.

Orca are seen all year round in Irish waters so I don't see how you can say that you do not believe they are out there.

The West coast of Ireland and the South coast have regular sighting of pods, and last July a well known Scottish pod came down the West coast.


Glad to see that you think that Great Whites are not shy about being seen close to shore, when in fact in many parts of the world they are. The regularity at which they get spotted near a shoreline depends on whether their prey of choice in that area is a surface feeder or a mid to deep water feeder. A great white that preys upon fish species will not be seen at the surface on a regular basis, wheras Great whites in seal heavy areas will be.

Guess which type we are with the Atlantic beside us? As although we have seal here, we do not have the same population numbers that they have in other countries, and we do not have the same amounts of human population living near the seal areas. We have found many of the great white's favoured prey fish in Irish waters over the last few years, but they are all fish who do not feed near the surface, so a GW feeding upon them would have no need to be near the surface either.

Last edited by Kess73; 07-11-2009 at 12:22.
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