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15-04-2012, 22:12   #16
kumate_champ07
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Originally Posted by Hanley View Post
He made an assumption that he was peeing out protein and questioned if it was true, he was told he wasn't. A question was answered.

The other one, about how much can X person eat at a single meal is really a question without a solid answer.
why didnt you address that?
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15-04-2012, 22:15   #17
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why didnt you address that?
I assume I was busy doing something else and had limited time to reply.
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15-04-2012, 22:22   #18
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how much protein can an average 200lb person process in one meal?

i know if i have a high protein meal and a shake shortly afterwards I'm pissing more often and I assume I'm pissing the excess protein out?
by 'process' do you mean in terms of adding muscle mass?

muscle is 70% 'water', so that would mean there is around 130g of protein in 1lb of muscle. extra protein is converted to glucose, if that glucose isnt needed it will be stored as fat.
it all depends on what state you body is in, does it need to repair muscle tissue, your age, what are your hormone levels like, etc etc
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16-04-2012, 03:06   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kumate_champ07 View Post
by 'process' do you mean in terms of adding muscle mass?

muscle is 70% 'water', so that would mean there is around 130g of protein in 1lb of muscle. extra protein is converted to glucose, if that glucose isnt needed it will be stored as fat.
it all depends on what state you body is in, does it need to repair muscle tissue, your age, what are your hormone levels like, etc etc
Just because muscle is 25 to 30% muscle it doesn't mean that's how much protein is required to build muscle. Its not even remotely close I'd say.
The body can't just mix 130g of ingested protein with a glass of water and add 1lb of muscle.

The other point about protein converting to glucose and then fat isn't right either. It won't do that in any sort of real life situation. Excess protein and then glucose from it, will burned off as fuel at the expense of dietary fat oxidation. Dietary fat will be stored "directly", as burning it as normal and then converting protein > glucose > fat is a much harder way of gettign from A to B. The body is very efficient and it doesn't create extra work for its self generally.
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16-04-2012, 08:02   #20
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Just because muscle is 25 to 30% muscle it doesn't mean that's how much protein is required to build muscle. Its not even remotely close I'd say.
The body can't just mix 130g of ingested protein with a glass of water and add 1lb of muscle.

The other point about protein converting to glucose and then fat isn't right either. It won't do that in any sort of real life situation. Excess protein and then glucose from it, will burned off as fuel at the expense of dietary fat oxidation. Dietary fat will be stored "directly", as burning it as normal and then converting protein > glucose > fat is a much harder way of gettign from A to B. The body is very efficient and it doesn't create extra work for its self generally.
thats not what I said.

so what do you say?
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16-04-2012, 08:40   #21
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Originally Posted by kumate_champ07 View Post
thats not what I said.

so what do you say?
If that not what you were implying (which is what it sounded like), then please could you explain this part then?
Quote:
Originally Posted by kumate_champ
by 'process' do you mean in terms of adding muscle mass?

muscle is 70% 'water', so that would mean there is around 130g of protein in 1lb of muscle.
How is the bolded part relevant to building muscle? Or to anything really. Unless the OP is a cannibal of course.

I wouldn't even attempt put a number on the protien required tbh. There's just so many varibles involved thats its a useless figure. 1lb muscle has a few hundred calories from protein contained within it, but the process to create that muscle costs far more protien and energy
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16-04-2012, 11:48   #22
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Meal should have approx 30g of proteins, passing the whole absorption process, average amount which will fall into your system (muscles and so on) will be 30g. These values are average, each organism is different and if you want to check how demanding is your body and how much it can digest I reckon that u should go on testes. At BB and fitness market you'll find supplements - enzymes that are accelerating digestion of proteins/lipids/carbs (up to max 40%). Remember that meal it self must be composed in way that there will be no conflicts between ingredients WTF? Lean meat will have better protein absorption then composed with some fat ingredients. Usually to build muscle mass u must take 2-3g per 1Kg of BM (body mass) (recommended is 2.5g/1KG). If your genes are poor at BB and fitness you won't going to pass them....of course you can bend them via hormones but I'm not sure if that is legal. But if u're hardcore then go to some clinic and do testes.

Last edited by maknak; 16-04-2012 at 11:55.
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16-04-2012, 12:31   #23
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Meal should have approx 30g of proteins, passing the whole absorption process, average amount which will fall into your system (muscles and so on) will be 30g.
As was pointed out already that simply isn't true. It's comes from a study of how much is absorbed over a set (short) time period, not total absorbed.
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16-04-2012, 14:22   #24
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oki but if it's a short time then time of absorption is important too. Proteins and other substances will absorb quicker after workout rather than after normal - doing nothing - meal. There are many studies in relation of after workout absorption. Can I have link of that study?
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16-04-2012, 15:19   #25
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In response to OP. General recommendation to the public 0.8 g/kg mass. However this is only enough to prevent deficiency. For someone performing regular resistance exercise (strength athlete/field sport) then you should be looking at 1.6 -2.2 g/kg body mass.

So if you weigh 68 kg then you would need 95 - 140 g Pro/day. This is what we need to support muscle synthesis (i.e creation of new protein from individual blocks as UL man alluded to earlier). Beyond the basics of preventing deficiency, high levels of dietary protein ensure that there is enough baseline protein to support synthesis, we also need excess protein in our diets for optimal functioning, including good immune function, metabolism, satiety, weight management and performance.

The upper limit of what out body can store at one time never increases so there is no point in consuming 150 g in the one go and expecting it to tide you over for the day.

Can you eat so much that you "piss" it out?..not really. The thermic effect of protein (which the energy your body uses to break down, absorb and store protein) is a lot higher than that of CHO/Fat. 30% of protein's energy (rem Pro = 4 kcal energy) is used for digestion, absorption and assimilation compared with 8% in CHO and 3% for Fat. So a lot of protein's energy is used before it can be converted to fuel or stored as fat.

Hope this helps.
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16-04-2012, 17:38   #26
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Originally Posted by Hammer Time View Post
In response to OP. General recommendation to the public 0.8 g/kg mass. However this is only enough to prevent deficiency. For someone performing regular resistance exercise (strength athlete/field sport) then you should be looking at 1.6 -2.2 g/kg body mass.
The newest researches shows that 2.5-3.0g/1KG of body mass is recommended when you want to build BM. Recommended by most of Pro Bodybuilders.
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16-04-2012, 18:10   #27
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Originally Posted by maknak View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer Time View Post
In response to OP. General recommendation to the public 0.8 g/kg mass. However this is only enough to prevent deficiency. For someone performing regular resistance exercise (strength athlete/field sport) then you should be looking at 1.6 -2.2 g/kg body mass.
The newest researches shows that 2.5-3.0g/1KG of body mass is recommended when you want to build BM. Recommended by most of Pro Bodybuilders.
Yeah recommendations by pro bodybuilders doesn't mean much unless you're going to use gear.
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17-04-2012, 03:48   #28
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Originally Posted by maknak View Post
The newest researches shows that 2.5-3.0g/1KG of body mass is recommended when you want to build BM. Recommended by most of Pro Bodybuilders.
Given they have a increased ability to build, it's largely irrelevant for anyone who isn't a pro-BB.
In fact, its probably gives you an idea of how much protein is excessive without chemical assistance.
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17-04-2012, 04:20   #29
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You could take 2.5 - 3.0 g/kg body mass/day (up to 2.8 g has been shown to be safe).

If you do decide to take that much you will be neglecting the other macronutrients in the diet, namely carbohydrate and fat both of which are necessary for optimal function.

I said 1.6 g/kg because I didnt know if the OP played sports or not. If you're training 2+ times per week with a game then you will need to balance the diet with CHO to replenish glycogen stores and thus protein needs to be reduced a little bit to allow extra energy in the diet. If he doesnt play sports then 2.2 g/kg bodyweight if more than enough to stay lean. Comes in at about 40 g Protein per meal for a 200 lb athlete
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17-04-2012, 10:04   #30
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Originally Posted by Mellor View Post
Given they have a increased ability to build, it's largely irrelevant for anyone who isn't a pro-BB.
In fact, its probably gives you an idea of how much protein is excessive without chemical assistance.
What I tried to say is that when you want to go and have an active life style (rugby, fitness, weight lifting) 0.8g/1KG will not help you. If you'll be at bodybuilding (just for yourself) 2-2.5g/1KG is recommended. I read few researches and these values are recommended for runners, rugby players, MMA and all other intensive sports. I knew that you gonna stick to pro bodybuilders and pharma-gear but if you take solutions from the top and try to apply at least 50% of it - it will give you more then some average publication (and then you'll take 50% of it) - get my point?? only 1/100 has some predispositions to be good rugby,mma,fitness,swimmer player and only 1/10000 will be Pro. I'm not try to convince that this is bad and this is wrong but when you copy try copy from the bests - this applys to every field of our life (cars,sport,job) "Every competition needs perfect nutrition" - Dorian Yates.
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