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22-07-2012, 17:16   #1
Fuinseog
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the curse of the old Butcher shop

There was a butcher shop beside st Nicks for about a hundred years. the family run business was closed under controversial circumstances when the absentee landlord demanded an exorbitant hike in rent. the building had been granted to the landlords family by Elisabeth 1 and the natives had paid rent on it since.

in any case after the butchers moved out no business seems to last long in the place. it seems to be a donut joint at the moment. Previously it was a chippers,a business surely guaranteed to succeed? so do you think the place is cursed or just a sign of how things come and go in Galway?
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22-07-2012, 18:27   #2
Rob A. Bank
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I'm not a great believer in supernatural powers...

Perhaps it has something to do with a poxy landlord and ridiculously high rents ?
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22-07-2012, 18:47   #3
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it seems to be a donut joint at the moment. Previously it was a chippers,a business surely guaranteed to succeed? so do you think the place is cursed or just a sign of how things come and go in Galway?
I believe that Polish cake shop is the look at they were going for, rather than donut shop - though St Kilda, it ain't.

I also understand that the man who was running it as a chipper decided to go back to sea, hence the change. Nothing to do with rents this time - at least not the way it was told to Mr justM anyway. (Quite disappointed, 'cos IMHO there's now no decent fish and chips in the city centre.)

Last edited by Mrs OBumble; 23-07-2012 at 12:09. Reason: typo fix
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22-07-2012, 18:49   #4
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The name of the building is 'Thimble Castle'.
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22-07-2012, 19:14   #5
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Never heard that Eliz 1 owned property in Galway. Saw many Galway title deeds, never saw any such mention
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22-07-2012, 23:16   #6
Fuinseog
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Never heard that Eliz 1 owned property in Galway. Saw many Galway title deeds, never saw any such mention
when the butchers were fighting to stay on and appealing for support SF were among the few to support them. An Phoblacht ran an article about them.

rent is still being paid to the Brits. apparently, the British had to be paid off when building the causeway to mutton island as part of the area around there belonged to them.
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22-07-2012, 23:18   #7
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I believe that Polish cake shop is the look at they were going for, rather than donut shop - though St Kilda, it ain't.

I also understand that the man who was running it as a chipper decided to go back to sea, hence the change. Nothing to do with rents this time - at least not the way it was told to Mr justM anyway. (Quite disappointed, 'cos IMHO there's now no decide fish and chips in the city centre.)

if he decided to go back to sea business must not have been booming.

there seems to be a rise in confectioners in the city. new place in High street. i wonder how long the latest occupants of thimble castle will last?



An Phoblacht
10 August 2000 Edition

Galway man wins legal battle but still faces eviction
BY ROISIN DE ROSA

On Shop Street, Galway's main pedestrianised thoroughfare, teaming with cosmopolitan city life, there is a little corner house, on a patch of land measuring 18 foot by 7 foot. The house is at least 250 years old. It has little tables outside and large umbrellas for the rain. This is ``Thimble Castle''. It's become a very small take-away.

Small as it may be, there is a family of English landlords who are threatening to take the shop away. The Mullins family, who have lived and worked in this shop over the past 100 years, are facing eviction by the landlord, one Isobel Davis, who claims ownership and the right to evict the Mullins's.

Back in 1739, Galway Corporation agreed to grant a lease on this little plot of land to the sheriff, one Simon Trulock, no doubt in return for some unrecorded favours he had rendered as sheriff, or later, as coroner and burgess of the city. The rent was one shilling a year. History does not record how this lease turned into a freehold, if it did, and Trulock built a little house on the land.

A century and a half later, in 1874, Brigade Surgeon Colonel John Norman Davis's father bought some title to the premises for the sum of £88, which was added to the considerable Davis Estate of some 42 properties in Galway and county.

In 1894, the grandfather of Michael Mullins, who now runs the take-away family business, took a lease on the property for £19 per annum, from which he ran a butcher's shop and reared a family of six children. By 1899, the close of the last century, the Mullins family had paid more in rent than the Davis family had paid when they first bought the property. Nevertheless, the Mullins went on paying their rent of £19 per annum to the Davis Estate.

Letter to quit

In 1978, the Mullins received a letter from solicitors, acting on behalf of Wing Commander Davis, the Surgeon's nephew, suggesting that the rent payable should henceforth be £1,300 per annum, a 7000 per cent increase. On 1 January the following year, when Michael's father, aged 74, was lying sick in his bed, a notice to quit was summarily delivered to his mother by auctioneer Andrew Roche. He was acting on behalf of a firm of solicitors, Blake and Kenny, of which the present Minister of Housing, Bobby Molloy's brother is the principal.

``Imagine how it must have been for them,'' Michael Mullins says. ``Neither my mother nor father had gone beyond fourth class in school. My father was very sick. My mother was terrified. They had three months to quit.'' The notice to quit was of course an encouragement to accept the 35-year lease offered at the new rent.

They did nothing, and the eviction never came, because by that time the Landlord and Tenants Acts of 1978 had been passed, giving rights to tenants to buy out the properties. There was therefore doubt over the legality of the notice to quit.

Bad advice

Neither Michael Mullins' father, William, nor his wife, Rita, knew any of this. The family sought advice from solicitors Sands and Brophy, who sought barrister's opinion from no less a fry than Seamus Egan, later a Supreme Court judge, and a Galway-based barrister, Conor Fahy. They concurred in recommending that Mullins should accept the offer of a 35-year lease from the Davis estate.

Michael Mullins, who took over the shop in 1983, began to realise that this had been bad advice and in fact meant that in accepting the lease from the Davis Estate, he had foregone his opportunity to acquire the leasehold. At the time, he could have bought the fee simple, Michael says, for under £300, 12 times the annual rent of £19 which he had been paying. ``They never told me it was a ground rent the family was paying, nor did they tell me that with a 99-year lease, I had the right to buy it out.''

Michael Mullins looked for a firm of solicitors who would take High Court proceedings against solicitors Sands and Brophy and the barrister Fahy, who had proffered this mistaken advice. But, as is well known in any case where professionals are invited to challenge fellow professionals, they were hard to find.

Advertisement for a solicitor

Finally, an advertisement in the Irish Times, which said ``Solicitor wanted. Courage essential. Money no object'' brought some 90 replies, though it remains unclear whether it was courage or expenses which was the attraction. Michael Mullins selected Ray Gilmartin from Kirby and Gilmartin, and away they went with a plenary summons in 1992, against Solicitors Sands and Brophy, and Barrister Fahy.

Finally ,the case came to the Four Courts last June, listed to be heard before Judge Peter Kelly, who has a the reputation of being judge who doesn't suffer fools, bureaucrats or incompetents kindly.

The defendants spared themselves the publicity and settled the very morning out of court with a payment of £75,000 damages to Michael Mullins, split between both defendants. ``It was a great victory, against all the odds,'' says Mullins. ``But above all the result shows that I am a fighter and will stand my ground. I won't concede to the injustice of all of this.''

Davis Estate carries on

Immediately after the case, Bobby Molloy's brother, Michael Molloy, ``specifically divested himself of the Davis Estate so far as Michael Mullins is concerned'', and handed the file to a firm of Dublin solicitors. Nevertheless, he continues to deal with the rest of the Davis Estate, which is still dealing in several properties in Galway and is hoping to realise substantial sums on what remains of the estate, including a property up the road from Trimble Castle on sale for around one quarter of a million pounds.

``It's the Dáil I blame for this,'' says Michael. ``They took over the republic for which men had given their lives, and yet they have done nothing to end this usury by absentee landlords, selling property over the heads of those who have lived there for years. What was the republic for if it was not to stop this injustice, and all the suffering that it brings?

``My parents endured years of hardship rearing us children. It wasn't easy. Yet they struggled to pay the rent, and now after all these years, Isobel Davis wants to evict us. It is a disgraceful situation. It's time the government brought it to an end. One thing is sure. I'll not be moving out of here.''

BY ROISIN DE ROSA




Burghers to go...


By Eoghan MacCormaic

Half way down the main shopping street in Galway, just at the entrance to the town's last surviving open air market - what a sad fate for a town which began its life as a centre of trade - and nestling in beside Saint Nicholas Cathedral's railings you'll find a castle. A small castle. In fact, a Thimble Castle. As castles go, it certainly isn't the oldest castle in the world, coming in at just a little over a hundred years of age.

The proud owner of the castle, one Michael Mullins, aspires to no greatness or grandeur and in fact will happily tell any visitor to his castle that the building began its illustrious life as a waiting room of sorts for the coachmen of the gentry whose station it was in life to wait while their `betters' worshipped in the neighbouring cathedral.

Just over a hundred years ago Michael's great-grandfather bought the building but luckily for him, no title accompanied the purchase. The Mullins, honourable people that they are, remain plain. No Lords or Ladies there.

I was thinking of Michael Mullins this week, and thinking of the long running dispute which he has bravely fought for the past number of years to retain ownership of his premises.

Michael has the misfortune, it has to be said, of inheriting a building on Irish soil which is claimed by an absentee English landlord. Or in this case, landlady. Happily settled in Paris Isobel Davies, daughter of a titled ex-RAF commander, has been trying with the help of a locally-based solicitor, to have Michael Mullins evicted for several years now for non-payment of a lease.

Michael, who until recently carried on the family business serving meat to the citizenry of Galway, retaliated by turning the front window of his premises into a shrine of information on the question of absentee landlords, English lords with Irish `estates' and rents, rack-rent and famine death and of course the Lord Lucan story.

For a few years Thimble Castle was more famous and photographed than the nearby Lynches Castle, Burkes Castle or any other Galway Castle.

In these BSE times, and faced with vegetarians like myself, it's tough being a butcher and Michael has now converted the ground floor of Thimble Castle into a burger bar and for a while, at least, the newsflashes on Lucan, on his court battles or on Famine commemorations have been replaced with flashes on his special opening offers. He is, however, no less determined to defend his inheritance and the family home and he remains a source of discontent against the feudal English system of land theft in Ireland which almost cost him his family home.

A small cheer must have echoed round the walls of Thimble Castle this week when over beyond, the word broke (ironically from the worst culprit of all hereditary title-holders, Elizabeth Windsor) that hereditary Lords were to go and the House of Lords was to be democratised. Not before time, but then, democracy is a new concept for the Brits and it will take time for them to get round it all.

For Michael - and a lot of others - I hope Tony Blair doesn't stop with removing their undemocratic, archaic, anachronistic seats. The real challenge is to remove their `right' to rents, land, wealth, and trespass on the lives of others.

Feudal symbolism is one thing but the persistent benefits of the feudal system in the late 20th century is another. Of course if Blair doesn't take that step there's no reason why Ireland should tolerate for another single day the remnant of a Feudal system planted here by the colonial power.

One immediate step would be to review all those instances of `Irish' titles, and claims to rents and leases by hereditary lords and knights, errant or otherwise. Hope springs eternal. Help might soon be at hand for the rightful owner of Thimble Castle.

Last edited by Fuinseog; 22-07-2012 at 23:22.
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22-07-2012, 23:37   #8
hollysf
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(Quite disappointed, 'cos IMHO there's now no decide fish and chips in the city centre.)[/QUOTE]
What about Mc Donagh's???
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22-07-2012, 23:57   #9
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(Quite disappointed, 'cos IMHO there's now no decide fish and chips in the city centre.)
What about Mc Donagh's???[/QUOTE]
Greasetrap. Like JM said no decent fish and chips in the city centre.
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23-07-2012, 05:23   #10
thesandeman
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Surprised you brought this up OP. Everyone from Galway knows what happened with the place.
I'm veggie nearly 40 years but still remember going in for the 5p chops and bones for the dog when I was a kid.
One of the loveliest familys in town.

@JustMary Is he talking about the C's or the people who took it over for a short while after? From my limited knowledge the only business that made money since Mike left was the Crepe shop.
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23-07-2012, 08:09   #11
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How come no one has asked the most important question? What are "decide fish and chips"?
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23-07-2012, 08:15   #12
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LOL! I missed that. Subliminal advertising maybe?
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23-07-2012, 08:52   #13
Fuinseog
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What about Mc Donagh's???
Greasetrap. Like JM said no decent fish and chips in the city centre.[/QUOTE]

a chippers with grease. i don't believe it!

Last edited by Fuinseog; 23-07-2012 at 08:54.
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23-07-2012, 09:07   #14
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rent is still being paid to the Brits. apparently, the British had to be paid off when building the causeway to mutton island as part of the area around there belonged to them.
Right, the Brits. The Brits being the Queen, the UK tax payer, Lord Whatshisname or the just the Brits
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23-07-2012, 10:47   #15
Galwayps
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I think its Harmack thats owns the building Now? In partnership with someone possibly. mentioned in this thread.
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showt...p?t=2056339009
I believe the Harry Fitz name was connected.
Don't think the crepe guy made money. Very busy but high rent and looked very very labour intensive.
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showt...p?t=2056339009
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