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18-01-2012, 15:13   #1
padowado
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Chainsaw cutting crooked

I bought a chainsaw sharping device,its a special chain
that sharpens by putting the point of the saw against a stump of a tree......the only thing is after using it a
few times the chainsaw is cutting crooked and gets
jammed......did this happen anyone else
Thanks in advance
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18-01-2012, 15:34   #2
pakalasa
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It's sharpening more on one side than the other, as in every second blade (say right side) is getting sharpened more than the other side. Is it set up right.
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18-01-2012, 15:43   #3
reilig
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It could be that you hit something (grit, pebble, nail or wire) and damaged the links on one side and that now when it sharpens, it does so unevenly.
I'd advise going to someone in the know about powersharp chains and sharpeners and gettingh their opinion. It may need to be ground down evenly.
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18-01-2012, 15:53   #4
lakill Farm
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is the powersharp bar chain and stone any good? I saw them for sale at the ploughing the last 2 years. I dont know how to file the chain and i do have to bring it to local huzty chainsaw man.

if there €79 e how long do you get from the chain and stone ? 5 sharpenings? 10? 15?
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18-01-2012, 16:27   #5
reilig
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Originally Posted by lakill Farm View Post
is the powersharp bar chain and stone any good? I saw them for sale at the ploughing the last 2 years. I dont know how to file the chain and i do have to bring it to local huzty chainsaw man.

if there €79 e how long do you get from the chain and stone ? 5 sharpenings? 10? 15?
I'm sure the powersharp is good, especially if you don't know a lot about sharpening chains. I'm no expert myself, but I have been trying to train myself to sharpen chains properly over the last few months - mostly by viewing youtube videos.

I have an electric sharpener but I feel that it takes too much out of the chain and reduces the life an awful lot. I only use it now to grind down chains that have several hand sharpenings. I have recently invested in hand files and holders for both saws which have the filing angle displayed on them. I practiced quite a bit on old chains and I think I can saw with reasonable confidence that I know how to properly hand sharpen a chain. I have a 14" Hysky 236 and i can sharpen it in under 2 minutes. The 20 inch chain takes a bit longer, but is still manageable. I don't see the need for the extra expense of the powersharp when I can do it myself and I'm not tied to buying the more expensive powersharp chain every time I need a new one!
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18-01-2012, 16:41   #6
lakill Farm
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i must check youtube for chain sharpening instead of silage cutting the next time . Did you buy the files off the hysky dealer? i might even ask my local dealer to show me how to sharpen it,




Quote:
Originally Posted by reilig View Post
I'm sure the powersharp is good, especially if you don't know a lot about sharpening chains. I'm no expert myself, but I have been trying to train myself to sharpen chains properly over the last few months - mostly by viewing youtube videos.

I have an electric sharpener but I feel that it takes too much out of the chain and reduces the life an awful lot. I only use it now to grind down chains that have several hand sharpenings. I have recently invested in hand files and holders for both saws which have the filing angle displayed on them. I practiced quite a bit on old chains and I think I can saw with reasonable confidence that I know how to properly hand sharpen a chain. I have a 14" Hysky 236 and i can sharpen it in under 2 minutes. The 20 inch chain takes a bit longer, but is still manageable. I don't see the need for the extra expense of the powersharp when I can do it myself and I'm not tied to buying the more expensive powersharp chain every time I need a new one!
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18-01-2012, 17:09   #7
colrow
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I was taught by an old boy,this is how I do it, you need the right size file for the chain, and a vice.

Clamp the bar in a vice so the chain runs freely, put the brake on, mark the tooth where you are going to start.

Get the file at the right angle, put slight pressure on pulling it back to yourself, and stroke the file from inside to out in one fluid motion, do this three times and move on to the next tooth, you can do a few teeth before you have to let the brake off and pull the chain round, until you have done all the teeth on one side of the chain.

I slacken the vice and turn the saw around to do the teeth the other side.

I was dead chuffed the first time i got it right

hth
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18-01-2012, 17:48   #8
pakalasa
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.....
That's exactly how I do it. Only slight difference is I give 2 heavy goes of the file followed by a very light one. I also give the height gauge a slight touch to bring down it's height. Like a hot knife through butter after that.
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18-01-2012, 18:52   #9
O.A.P
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colrow View Post
I was taught by an old boy,this is how I do it, you need the right size file for the chain, and a vice.

Clamp the bar in a vice so the chain runs freely, put the brake on, mark the tooth where you are going to start.

Get the file at the right angle, put slight pressure on pulling it back to yourself, and stroke the file from inside to out in one fluid motion,

hth
So you sharpen it in to yourself if I understand it right. I have always sharpened away from me and it seems to work anyway but I have one of the guides that clip over the bar and chain, a great help almost fool proof really
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18-01-2012, 19:17   #10
pakalasa
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You should sharpen from the Engine out to the bar & chain, in that direction.
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18-01-2012, 20:16   #11
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If your dealer doesn't handsharpen the chain then you have no chance of handsharpening it after. The heat of a sharpening stone will temper the metal and make it too hard to sharpen with a file.
The depth gauge on a tooth shouldn't need to be lowered much during the life of the chain. If you lower it too much then the chain will become too aggressive.
Get a proper oregon branded hand sharpner for the correct size file.
An oregon round file with last about three sharpenings on an 18 to 20 inch bar.
.325 chain uses a 3/16 file
3/8 chain uses a 7/32 file.
Sharpen your chain on the saw in a vice.
If the chain is cutting crooked then consider increasing the gauge of the chain assuming you are using 3/8 chain.
keep the file high on the tooth. the bottom of the tooth isn't exposed to wood so no point sharpening it.
Good luck finding a dealer who knows their stuff.
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19-01-2012, 09:41   #12
reilig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakill Farm View Post
i must check youtube for chain sharpening instead of silage cutting the next time . Did you buy the files off the hysky dealer? i might even ask my local dealer to show me how to sharpen it,
Yea, The files are branded oregon and were bought off the husky dealer. €10 for the file and holder, the depth gauge and the flat file. He was also good to give me advice on how to do it. As others said, sharpen from the inside out. The file holder is useful to help to get the right angle.

Its not rocket science, but does take a little practice to be able to have the chain 100%.
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19-01-2012, 17:03   #13
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Originally Posted by pakalasa View Post
I give 2 heavy goes of the file followed by a very light one.
Similar here. Except I would give the first stroke light, as sort of a cleaning stroke, and then 3 working strokes.
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19-01-2012, 17:15   #14
CJhaughey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleganza View Post
If your dealer doesn't handsharpen the chain then you have no chance of handsharpening it after. The heat of a sharpening stone will temper the metal and make it too hard to sharpen with a file.
This is incorrect, what actually happens when a chain is sharpened by a grinder is that the steel loses its temper and it becomes softer.
Metal is tempered is if its quenched in oil or water while its red hot.
If you see a tooth that has turned blue its likely to have been annealed by heating and then slow cooling.
If you use a grinder to sharpen a chain it shouldn't throw sparks if it does too much pressure is being applied.
Different chains are harder than others, Stihl chains are harder to sharpen than Oregon, Carlton or Windsor.
That said a good sharp file is still the best way to get a sharp chain and keep the temper of the teeth.
The cutters need to be the same length or the chain will cut crooked.
If you hit a stone or nail/wire make sure all the cutters are sharpened to the same length not just the damaged ones.
If the bar groove is worn and the chain can rock side to side more than 1-2mm it can also cause crooked cutting.
When you file file forward and every three strokes tap the tip of the file on a hard surface like the vise, this clears the swarf from the file and lets it cut cleanly.
A handy tool is the Husky roller file guide, it has a depth gauge built in for the rakers.
My preference is to sharpen 4-5 chains at home in the vice with the sharpener that clamps to the bar and has a fixed angle.
Bring them all with you and change them during the day rather than touching them up during cutting.
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19-01-2012, 21:19   #15
O.A.P
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A handy tool is the Husky roller file guide, it has a depth gauge built in for the rakers.
.[/QUOTE]
Thats the one I have makes it much easier to put an edge on the teeth definately. I cant work out how to use the depth gauge for the rakers though it only lines up correctly for either soft wood or hard wood , I cant remember which. It cuts away fine anyway but if I could sort the rakers out properly it would have to improve though.
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