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06-01-2012, 10:24   #16
slowburner
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Fascinating images and an interesting website. I love the 'Click to embiggen'.
What is the variable that he used to create the image - is it the first letter of a placename?
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11-01-2012, 22:29   #17
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The hard 'C', as in Cork, is often replaced by the lazy English landlords with the letter 'K'. Most every place in Ireland with the prefix 'cíl-' [Kilcoole, Kilpedder and so on] is simply spelled that way because the English preferred it that way - as we all know, the letter 'c' in English is actually pronounced like an 's' in the alphabet, but 50% of the time pronounced like 'k'. In both Celtic languages in the British Isles, the letter 'c' is hard.

The letters 'x' and 'z' did not exist in the English language, but were transcripted from Latin and Greek.

The rare use of the letter 'Z' in place-names - mainly in Cornwall - are due to the local dialect pronunciation of the letter 'S' as in Saint Sinar, after whom Zennor was named.

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Last edited by tac foley; 11-01-2012 at 22:42.
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20-02-2012, 21:12   #18
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In both Celtic languages in the British Isles, the letter 'c' is hard.
That would be Scots Gaelic and Welsh then?

Outside the British Isles, here in Ireland, the "c" is also generally hard
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11-03-2012, 12:26   #19
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fairly cool stuff. GIS is really on the cusp of becoming huge, if not already. its unbelievable how powerful it can be in showing things that no other method of analysis can
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04-04-2012, 11:00   #20
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That would be Scots Gaelic and Welsh then?

Outside the British Isles, here in Ireland, the "c" is also generally hard
Actually, the British isles would be a much better title for this thread (instead of Ireland & the UK) Why? well firstly there is no border marked on the map of Ireland, so you can't actually see the demarkation between the UK & Ireland. So either Britain & Ireland (http://bigthink.com/ideas/41499) should have been used (the two main islands), or 'British isles' which covers the whole group of islands including the Orkneys, Isle of Man, outer hebridies, etc etc etc.

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04-04-2012, 11:02   #21
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That would be Scots Gaelic and Welsh then?

Outside the British Isles, here in Ireland, the "c" is also generally hard
Actually, the British isles would be a much better title for this thread (instead of Ireland & the UK) Why? well firstly there is no border marked on the map of Ireland, so you can't actually see the demarkation between the UK & Ireland. So either Great Britain & Ireland (http://bigthink.com/ideas/41499) should have been used, or 'British isles' which covers the whole group of islands including the Orkneys, Isle of Man, outer hebridies, etc.
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06-04-2012, 10:22   #22
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Actually, the British isles would be a much better title for this thread (instead of Ireland & the UK)
Actually it wouldn't - unless you want the mother of all rows
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06-04-2012, 12:44   #23
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Actually it wouldn't - unless you want the mother of all rows
Very true.
I've never understood the problem with using the description 'British Isles' - it's simply a convenient physical geographical term.
'British & Irish Isles' while PC, is an almightily cumbersome mouthful.
If someone wants to read political overtones into the term - good luck to them.
Each to their own
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09-04-2012, 00:50   #24
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Very true.
I've never understood the problem with using the description 'British Isles' - it's simply a convenient physical geographical term.
'British & Irish Isles' while PC, is an almightily cumbersome mouthful.
If someone wants to read political overtones into the term - good luck to them.
Each to their own
Nothing to do with PC. Ireland isn't "British". Period.
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09-04-2012, 03:01   #25
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Actually it wouldn't - unless you want the mother of all rows
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Nothing to do with PC. Ireland isn't "British". Period.
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10-04-2012, 19:44   #26
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10-04-2012, 20:14   #27
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