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19-05-2012, 21:39   #1
Scoop93
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Applied Psychology IADT

Hey I have applied psychology in IADT down on my CAO.
I was hoping if anyone in the course could tell me what it's like and if it's easy/hard and what the hours are like for it, etc.

Any sort of information would be much appreciated
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22-05-2012, 18:38   #2
cheesefiend
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Hi Scoop,

In first year you have 6 modules. 2 of those modules are related to the IT side of the course, they are: Multimedia and Design (three hours/week) and Information Computer Technology (three hours/week).

Then you have four psychology modules (Research Methods and Statistics, Perception and Ergonomics, Introduction to Psychology and Cyberpsychology), each of these modules has a two hour lecture per week which everyone must attend. There are also two hour labs for each module where the year will be split into groups and each group attends all of the labs every second week (I'm not explaining this very well, I know). So you'll have one week where your hours will be around 14 per week and another where your hours will be around 22.

If you like computers and are relatively quick on the uptake in relation to new software you will be fine for the IT modules. However, you should be aware that in second year the class is spit into two paths: the practice path (all traditional psychology modules) and the applied path (4 core psychology modules along with two IT modules). You are split into these groups based firstly on preference, however, if too many people apply for one pathway than the course is split based on grades in first year also.

This puts a little extra pressure on marks in first year. However, overall the course is not too hard. 50% of your overall grade at the end of the year for each module is based on continuous assessment. This usually involves two assignments for each module, one per semester. You have plenty of time to work for them and if you put your head down and do well it really takes the pressure off come exam time.

Overall, all the lecturers are very friendly and easy to approach. In first year there is also the added advantage of PAL sessions. This is where first year students meet once a week for about an hour along with one of two second or third year students who facilitate learning in the group. They are not teachers but students help each other to learn. I did it in first year and found it extremely helpful and a great way to get to know others in your year.

Anywho, I really rambled on there. If you (or anyone else) has any other questions feel free to ask here or through a PM.
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24-05-2012, 16:58   #3
Scoop93
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Thanks for all the info, it's great!!
Just another few questions; do you and other people in the course find it interesting/boring?
How long is the year, in terms of how long is each semester?
And also, what is the social life like in IADT?
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24-05-2012, 20:48   #4
ctopher
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The course is generally interesting but it depends what area of psychology you're interested in. I didn't like organisational and sport psychology because I have no interest in either. But you also do modules like forensic psych, social psych, and abnormal psychology which are really interesting (at least to me).

Career propects are good. There's 9 from my year who got jobs in Microsoft straight out, 3 in another organisation, others got postgrads (myself included)

Socially life in IADT is good but most people make their own of it. There's usually stuff going on in the college but also your class/friends will be doing seperate stuff too. To be honest, the further up in years you go, the less time you'll have to think about that. .
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27-05-2012, 21:29   #5
cheesefiend
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As ctopher has said it really depends on what you yourself are interested in. I didn't really know what studying psychology would involve when I started. I really didn't investigate enough before I started [so you're doing better than I did ], I didn't realise how much research you have to do. As with most courses there are modules you will like and others you won't. Research Methods and Statistics can be difficult. It's the one module you will have throughout your degree and will need a good grasp of in order to complete your thesis and also if you want to go on to do a post grad. If you really hate maths then it could be a challenge for you, however there is lots of help available. There will be a lot of different modules, ctopher has mentioned some, others are: developmental psychology, educational psychology, personality and individuals differences. I find the course difficult enough to be challenging and remain interesting without being too hard, hopefully you will find the same.

I'm not really sure about how long the year is. As far as I remember we started the second week in September and finished for Christmas the second week in December. I think we were back the end of the first week in January and you usually finish around the 10th/11th of May.

The social life is quite good. You have to remember the college is quite small and so when you compare it to events that UCD or Trinity might hold then it seems pretty weak but being small has it's advantages in that you know so many people and can get involve fairly easily.
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29-05-2012, 22:29   #6
Scoop93
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Ahh whopper stuff! Thanks so much for all the help and advice
Just a couple more things, how difficult is all the research? And overall, did you enjoy the course?
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01-06-2012, 11:53   #7
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The taught research aspects (i.e., module in research methods and statistics & advanced research methods and statistics in fourth year) aren't too bad. They're no more difficult than any other subject. However, your final research project (and a smaller one in third year) is very challenging. Most colleges give you a research project to do and you just go and do it. In IADT you choose your own topic, design a research project around it and conduct the research. This can be hard in terms of passing ethics panels, recruiting participants, analysing results and writing up findings. That said, research is part of nearly every degree programme you will do.

I know people from nearly every psychology course in Ireland through connections with the PSI. From what I can tell IADT stands quite strong in terms of student satisfaction. I personally really enjoyed the course. The work you will do is very different from other places. Where essays can be the norm elsewhere, in IADT you do debates, developing online courses, presentations, research proposals, reflective learning, portfolios and even in developing your own 'brain game.'

if you have more questions, ask away!
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07-06-2012, 10:02   #8
Scoop93
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Sounds fairly deadly!
And what are the lecture theaters like in IADT? I know they wouldn't be to the same scale as those in UCD but they aren't like a classroom size?
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07-06-2012, 10:25   #9
ctopher
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Originally Posted by Scoop93 View Post
Sounds fairly deadly!
And what are the lecture theaters like in IADT? I know they wouldn't be to the same scale as those in UCD but they aren't like a classroom size?
It depends on the building and allocation of rooms to subjects. Psychology runs primarily out of the Atrium building and the Carriglea. The Atrium has the largest lecture theatre which hold a hunderd+ I think. Some rooms are similiar to classrooms but most would be tiered lecture theatres. You will also work out of computer labs a good bit especially for the one hour lab you have for modules and for your statistics and IT modules.

The campus is due to get a lot of new stuff over the next few years including a new Film school, three new buildings (including a new canteen) and a larger library. With this I image there'll be more lecture theatres too as space can be tight
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09-06-2012, 18:27   #10
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I just finished 1st year and I really enjoyed the course. I think cheesefiend and ctopher illustrated the course fairly well and IADT in general. Yesterday I was told that i got the path I wanted for 2nd year (psychology and design) whoo!

I found the first year modules very easy, just keep on top of the CAs (Continuous assessments, a word you will constantly hear) and you'll be grand. Just a word of warning that ICT, imo, was extremely mundane. And that's coming from someone who likes computers.
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23-06-2013, 19:40   #11
Sportsguy1991
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If you really wish to pursue psychology as a career and don't have sufficient cao points for the credible institutions supplying the service, then go through the back door to one of them.

I know UCD and some others don't offer this path but a lot do. Galway, Maynooth and more give you the opportunity to put in a year of work and get where you want to be. If you really want to go down the psychology road, the one year of work in arts to qualify for the limited backdoor spots is the way to go. If you really want it, you'll get it. Simple.

If you do choose IADT/Waterford, you are wasting your college grant, and will have to pay 7000-9000 for repeating first year in a proper college to do what you could be doing come September.

Don't waste such a chunk of money and a year of your life, take the back door somewhere and work really hard or what you are passionate about.
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24-06-2013, 11:10   #12
ctopher
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Originally Posted by Sportsguy1991 View Post
If you really wish to pursue psychology as a career and don't have sufficient cao points for the credible institutions supplying the service, then go through the back door to one of them.

I know UCD and some others don't offer this path but a lot do. Galway, Maynooth and more give you the opportunity to put in a year of work and get where you want to be. If you really want to go down the psychology road, the one year of work in arts to qualify for the limited backdoor spots is the way to go. If you really want it, you'll get it. Simple.

If you do choose IADT/Waterford, you are wasting your college grant, and will have to pay 7000-9000 for repeating first year in a proper college to do what you could be doing come September.

Don't waste such a chunk of money and a year of your life, take the back door somewhere and work really hard or what you are passionate about.
Sportsguy1991 you clearly have no idea what you're talking about. The course in IADT is a four year bachelor of science. It is accredited by the Psychological Society of Ireland. IADT hosted the Annual Congress of Psychology Students this year with the biggest turnout ever. I originally attended Trinity and left because the standard of teaching was awful. I graduated from the course in IADT last year and immediately got accepted to a postgraduate programme in The University of Edinburgh, which is one of the world's top universities. I know many people who have gone on to study various Master's, PhDs and Clinical Psychology programmes.

If, in the future, you decide to give advice, go check your facts before doing so.
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