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24-08-2011, 16:04   #16
Cal04
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meant to say, rang someone earlier who said he would put in stainless steel pipe, down chimney, leaving original flue, takes a days work, costs around €1,500
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24-08-2011, 16:06   #17
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tricky d, is it just one flue you have too?
One.

We also had to get 2 'blocking things' made up to address the issues M and C raised.

Last edited by tricky D; 24-08-2011 at 16:08.
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24-08-2011, 16:10   #18
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expanding chimney/installing second flue would be at least €5000-7000 as its a big operation. major work.
It may be possible to gut the existing one and install two fexible liners, but i never heard of it being done. you'd have to research it. if possible it would be much cheaper as there is no disruption to the roof.

installing an insulated stainless steel flue and repair existing - should get it done for under 3000.

blocking off fireplace and using only the stove with your existing flue would only be a couple of hundred.

personally i'd reccomend getting rid of the open fire in any case. as said they are huge heat wasters. maybe install a sealed solid fuel fireplace/room heater instead. much better.
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24-08-2011, 16:10   #19
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One.

We also had to get 2 'blocking things' made up to address the issues M and C raised.
can you explain more
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24-08-2011, 16:12   #20
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expanding chimney/installing second flue would be at least €5000-7000 as its a big operation. major work.
It may be possible to gut the existing one and install two fexible liners, but i never heard of it being done. you'd have to research it. if possible it would be much cheaper as there is no disruption to the roof.

installing an insulated stainless steel flue and repair existing - should get it done for under 3000.

blocking off fireplace and using only the stove with your existing flue would only be a couple of hundred.

personally i'd reccomend getting rid of the open fire in any case. as said they are huge heat wasters. maybe install a sealed solid fuel fireplace/room heater instead. much better.
goog grief, i wish i hadn't asked
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24-08-2011, 16:14   #21
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meant to say, rang someone earlier who said he would put in stainless steel pipe, down chimney, leaving original flue, takes a days work, costs around €1,500
that wouldn't be any goo in your situation as you'd still only have one flue, a stainless one. What i'm talking about is an insulated flue that will be separate from you old chimney. It would be an extra stainless steel thing on your roof.

oh is is a bungalow or a two story and how old.

if a bungalow it would be a good bit cheaper thoug, as you dont have the extra floor to negotiate.
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24-08-2011, 16:16   #22
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bungalow, 11 years old
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24-08-2011, 16:21   #23
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Bungalow. well revise those figures down by say 25-30%.

the ideal solution would be to gut out the old chimney and have two steel flueliners installed if possible. cant say a price on this though. have to ask really. certainly cheaper and will look better from outside.

to keep both fires insulated flue will be cheaper option, but steel stack on roof might look ugly?

going cheaper again, move the stove to a location on an outside wall and put your new insulated flue out through that wall and up th outside. then fix up the other fireplace to its original. i'd be thinking around 2000 for that. Can you do this? but then this would be complicated further if your stove has back boiler/plumbing attatched.

if you were to just block up the open fire and use the stove with the existing chimney/single flue you would work out cheapest, and your home will be alot warmer also as you won't have all those draughts and heat losses through the open fire. Your stove will have a better draught too and run better.

Last edited by Master and commander; 24-08-2011 at 16:32.
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24-08-2011, 16:45   #24
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can think of any physical/structural reason why gutting any refitting two flues into the existing chimney would not be feasible, unless ther is a space resriction in it.

-in fireplace, break through fluegahtering
- remove all the old flueliners and sand/lime filling
- at top, remove the existing pot and enlarge hol in or remove the chimney cap
- install one 6" flue for stove and one 8" flue for open fire.(or two 6" ones if installing a fluch stove/room heater in openfireplace)
- repair flue gathering/appliance attatchments. chimney might need filling. have to check
- repair or replace chimney cap and fit two pots.

as for price, i can't be sure as i've never seen it done. a weeks work say, for two men - say 1200 pay, new flues say 2000 (theyre not cheap btw), other materials, cement etc 300. I'd say you'd be looking at €3500-4000 or thereabouts,
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25-08-2011, 03:13   #25
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Cal04,

As you sent a PM for my opinion I will give it, and yes you are correct I am in the stove business.

What you are describing is two appliances into one flue?

For doing such a thing the installer should be arrested and serve at least 5 years !

Building regulations are very good guides but common sense should always be observed, when we look at Part J of the building regulations the majority of the documents only refer to good working practice (or common sense).

I can not understand how your fireplace and stove have worked in the same flue without any problems.

As for fitting another flue into an existing chimney in a modern house I reckon you will come across serious space restriction as already mentioned because most chimneys are built to suit the number of flues / fireplaces they are to serve.

Carbon Monoxide is not the main problem with the set up as described, the danger is smoke can be drawn into the adjoining room and if there was a chimney fire the hot embers will most likely fall into the open fireplace possibly onto the floor.

A simple temporary fix for someone without the funds is to block up the fireplace or remove the stove.

A more permanent fix is to fit a twin wall flue beside the existing chimney breast for the stove and while staying within the building regulations encase the new flue so it looks like part of the original chimney.

There are a number of possibilities but it could be misleading to post them as a survey is needed to establish exactly what is needed and what will work.

I hope the above is of help,

.
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25-08-2011, 07:56   #26
Cal04
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A more permanent fix is to fit a twin wall flue beside the existing chimney breast for the stove and while staying within the building regulations encase the new flue so it looks like part of the original chimney.
is this a huge amount of work, how expensive would that be?
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25-08-2011, 13:39   #27
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Cal04,

There are a number of possibilities but it could be misleading to post them as a survey is needed to establish exactly what is needed and what will work.

I hope the above is of help,

.
Throwing numbers at the problem from my desk would be a very bad idea because what usually happens is I will over compensate for possible details that are already taken care of or I can under estimate which raises a persons hopes of having the problem solved within their budget only to find the cost goes up following the survey.

A survey should be carried out with an open mind to achieving the best solution for the customer, my experience is if the customer can't afford to do the job properly today they usually save the necessary funds, it is not unusual for people to come back to me a year or even two after the original survey.

Sorry I can't be of more help regarding the cost.

.
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29-08-2011, 17:51   #28
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Hi,
I have just bought a boiler stove and was in the very same position, ie the stove is in a seperate room but back to back with the open fire. You most definately cannot service both fires with one flue. Your house insurance will not cover you if you (god forbid) had a fire. If you can't build a new chimney with a clay flue to service the stove your only other option is a stainless steel twin wall insulated system. If your house is bungalow this will obviously be cheaper. Also bear in mind that your flue system must be at least 15feet high from the top of the stove to the flue exit. This provides for better draw on smoke and fumes and decreases the chance of downdraft. I got my flue system from miflues.ie in Co. Meath. Their website has downloadable brochures with clear and detailed pictures.
They can also provide the system in black if you want to avoid that industrial look.I have to repeat what was already posted and that is i would strongly recommend that you do not light both fires if they lead to a single flue.

Last edited by joeblob; 29-08-2011 at 18:09.
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14-09-2011, 00:37   #29
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Any updates cal04?
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27-02-2012, 00:06   #30
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Just one flue

Hi Folks

Am I glad I have seen the thread. I was about to put a solid fuel stove with boiler, back to back with an open fire, into one flue. I wont be doing that now. I too live in a bungalow, 1350 sq ft. 8 radiators. I am going to have to build another chimney now. I have had several people tell me you can do this and several people tell me you cant. Reading through this now, "decision made". I never thought about house insurance and how it would effect my policy. Let alone the safety of my young family.

Next question !!! Do I have to apply for planning to erect another chimney ? What is the best stove? The house has 8 radiators. The kitchen where the stove is going is 30 feet x 17 feet (approx) with high ceilings. Every stove provider is telling me that their stove is the best one. To say I'm a little muddled is an under statement.

Obviously we must save for this, I'm guessing this will cost 4000-5000 all in, or am I dreaming. I have a friend who will build the chimney for me. I have not talked to a plumber yet. I'm hoping to run the pipes up the wall across the attic and down into the hot press. (save digging up floors). Hide them some where in the new chimney, Can this be done.

Any advice welcome, cheers
Emmett
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