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22-02-2012, 13:59   #16
Mrs Fox
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Oh I know what kosher salt are originally for but I just wonder how different are they different in taste.
Like Fleur De Sel salt are not as strong, and then you get the super salty fine salt that they use daily in South East Asia.

So it seems that you're all saying kosher ones tastes like any other sea/rock salt.
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22-02-2012, 14:06   #17
BailMeOut
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Oh I know what kosher salt are originally for but I just wonder how different are they different in taste.
Like Fleur De Sel salt are not as strong, and then you get the super salty fine salt that they use daily in South East Asia.

So it seems that you're all saying kosher ones tastes like any other sea/rock salt.
tastes the same as normal table salt, its is just a different texture.
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22-02-2012, 22:46   #18
Little Alex
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If it needs to be kosher for religious reasons, SuperValu in Churchtown, Dublin has a Jewish food section and you might be able to get it there.
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23-02-2012, 01:29   #19
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If it needs to be kosher for religious reasons, SuperValu in Churchtown, Dublin has a Jewish food section and you might be able to get it there.
Plain is also kosher in religious terms
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23-02-2012, 02:32   #20
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Kosher salt is good for a lot of reasons, the bigger grains make it earier to "pinch" and sprinkle. It's got more surface contact so good for drawing proteins out of meats when you are searing them. It's just handier for cooking, you use a lot less and get better results.

For example.

When grilling a steak (on a charcoal grill) take the steak out of the firdge for 20-30 mins to come up to room temp and then for the last 5 mins give a good sprinkle of kosher salt, you would use a lot less than you would fresh cracked sea salt and the added surface contact pulls more moisture (and proteins) to the surface of the meat so when you throw it on the grill there is a lot more "stuff" on the surface of the meat to caramalise.
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23-02-2012, 03:37   #21
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Originally Posted by Seaneh View Post
Kosher salt is good for a lot of reasons, the bigger grains make it earier to "pinch" and sprinkle. It's got more surface contact so good for drawing proteins out of meats when you are searing them. It's just handier for cooking, you use a lot less and get better results.

For example.

When grilling a steak (on a charcoal grill) take the steak out of the firdge for 20-30 mins to come up to room temp and then for the last 5 mins give a good sprinkle of kosher salt, you would use a lot less than you would fresh cracked sea salt and the added surface contact pulls more moisture (and proteins) to the surface of the meat so when you throw it on the grill there is a lot more "stuff" on the surface of the meat to caramalise.
Bigger grains mean there is less surface contact for the same amount.
All salt will draw water and proteins to the surface.
I think large grained salt is better for meat, but not the reasons you said. I like to salt it, then remove the salt my brush it off before frying/grilling/BBQ etc
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25-02-2012, 10:13   #22
Seaneh
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Originally Posted by Mellor View Post
Bigger grains mean there is less surface contact for the same amount.
All salt will draw water and proteins to the surface.
I think large grained salt is better for meat, but not the reasons you said. I like to salt it, then remove the salt my brush it off before frying/grilling/BBQ etc
The entire point of Kosher salt is because the grains have more contact with the meat, which draws the water (and blood) out of the meat, this is what makes it good for koshering.
Because the grains consist of several crystals stuck together, they have a larger surface area than other types.

You have to use a lot less by weight for the same effect.

Also, brushing it off with your brush means you are also, by default, removing some of the liquids and proteins you have pulled to the surface and all it really does it limit speckling which might occur if you were cooking on a flat pan.
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08-05-2013, 09:42   #23
pmac086
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i suppose it's not like it's going to go off or anything.
It might if moisture gets to it LOL. seriously though, would love to buy a box off you if you are in Dublin, <snip> , cheers Peter

Mod note: Phone number edited out

Last edited by Faith; 08-05-2013 at 09:50.
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08-05-2013, 09:47   #24
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It might if moisture gets to it LOL. seriously though, would love to buy a box off you if you are in Dublin, send me a text xxxxxxxxx , cheers Peter
Rather than quote your phone number on a public forum, maybe you should send the poster a private message?
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08-05-2013, 09:56   #25
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Ok, thank you for that, will PM
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29-07-2013, 17:30   #26
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im trying to find a place that sells kosher salt in ireland....does anyone know where ?
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29-07-2013, 17:33   #27
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im trying to find a place that sells kosher salt in ireland....does anyone know where ?
Yes. Everywhere that sells 'salt'. Sodium chloride is sodium chloride. Is sodium chloride.

Enjoy your dinner.
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29-07-2013, 17:40   #28
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im trying to find a place that sells kosher salt in ireland....does anyone know where ?
If it's for a recipe, you can use Maldon salt.
http://www.maldonsalt.co.uk/

You'll find it in most supermarkets. Supervalu, Dunnes, tesco, they all have it. English market in Cork also has it.

It's a sea salt, with huge crystals.
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29-07-2013, 19:24   #29
Lissavane
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If it's for a recipe, you can use Maldon salt.
http://www.maldonsalt.co.uk/

You'll find it in most supermarkets. Supervalu, Dunnes, tesco, they all have it. English market in Cork also has it.

It's a sea salt, with huge crystals.
I know nothing about kosher salt but I use Maldon sea-salt and find it nicer to taste than other sea or rock-salts that I've tried.

I don't understand why Maldon tastes different from other pure salt. It seems "sweeter" somehow. Maybe it's my imagination but I don't think so. I'd have thought that any pure salt, without anti-caking agents, should taste the same regardless of source. It's all sodium chloride after all.

Maldon sells for many multiples of the price of other pure salts. Either it's a huge confidence trick or there is a difference.
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30-07-2013, 09:35   #30
Honey-ec
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Originally Posted by Lissavane View Post
I know nothing about kosher salt but I use Maldon sea-salt and find it nicer to taste than other sea or rock-salts that I've tried.

I don't understand why Maldon tastes different from other pure salt. It seems "sweeter" somehow. Maybe it's my imagination but I don't think so. I'd have thought that any pure salt, without anti-caking agents, should taste the same regardless of source. It's all sodium chloride after all.

Maldon sells for many multiples of the price of other pure salts. Either it's a huge confidence trick or there is a difference.
There's one way to find out - do a blind taste test.
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