Honda CR-V 1998-2000 - boards.ie
Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
18-02-2012, 18:16   #1
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
Honda CR-V 1998-2000

Any owners on here?! Looking at getting one, is there much difference in mpg between manual and auto? Any typical nct failure areas with them?

Anyone selling one?!
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
Advertisement
20-02-2012, 19:22   #2
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
Any takers on this?!
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
20-02-2012, 19:34   #3
jayok
Registered User
 
jayok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Dublin
Posts: 1,878
Didn't have one, but looked at them at the time.

They came as non-VTEC 2.0 petrols. Solid engine, but a bit of an alcoholic. Considered very reliable, once serviced and no too sensative to service intervals, though a well maintained one is recommended.

Weak point is the rear-diff-clutch-thingy. That is the mechanism that enabled the 4WD. The CR-V isn't permanent 4WD and the rear-wheels only engage when the front wheels slip. What's important here is that the fluid was change at 75k miles and/or 8 years. Most people didn't do this and it results in premature failure and grinding on full lock (as the front wheels slip in this formation).

Beyond that it was based on the most simple and reliable of Honda's development period. As such, a well maintained one will go and go and go.

I suppose those a 98-00 one will be 14-12 years old now, other things to watch would be rubbers, bushes, etc. But these are age related items rather than design problems.

Last edited by jayok; 20-02-2012 at 19:39.
jayok is offline  
20-02-2012, 19:37   #4
jayok
Registered User
 
jayok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Dublin
Posts: 1,878
Oh and on the Auto vs Manual. The Auto box design is pretty old in it and is only a 4 speed. As such, the gears are quite long and makes it sluggish to move and it seems to overrev while cruising.

The manual is a bog-standard solid 5-speed.

In terms of consumption I believe the Auto was about 22mpg whereas the Manual was about 28mpg (no idea of that new fangled l/100km)
jayok is offline  
20-02-2012, 20:24   #5
maddness
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Dublin
Posts: 355
I used to sell Hondas when this model CRV was around and they were very popular. They are very heavy on petrol with low 20's for the manual and even worse for the auto but are typical of the 90's honda with a strong engine and very good build quality.
If its cheap why not.
maddness is offline  
Advertisement
20-02-2012, 22:54   #6
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
I'm looking for something as a relatively cheap runabout, may have to commute later on in the year so looking for something that isn't stupid on fuel consumption.
It seems to be very hard to find any fuel consumption figures for it online.
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
20-02-2012, 23:21   #7
George Dalton
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Daltons.ie
Posts: 3,938
They drink petrol, especially at motorway speeds.

I wouldn't be an expert on them reliability wise as we only look after a few examples. They seem to be a typical bulletproof Honda though. I think the only parts I have ever had to change on them apart from service parts are a couple of CV joint boots, plus front upper wishbones and lower balljoints are a bit of a weak point. The CV boots and balljoints are cheap but the upper arms cost a few quid.
George Dalton is offline  
01-03-2012, 18:28   #8
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
Picked up one (1998) yesterday, fuel consumption isn't that bad. I stuck €40 into her and drove about 130 miles. Put up another 20 miles today. If I can get 200 before needle goes back to original, I'll be getting about 34/35mpg out of it.

I have to say it handles excellantly, like a tall car more than anything.
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
01-03-2012, 20:38   #9
jayok
Registered User
 
jayok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Dublin
Posts: 1,878
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Slow IRL View Post
Picked up one (1998) yesterday, fuel consumption isn't that bad. I stuck €40 into her and drove about 130 miles. Put up another 20 miles today. If I can get 200 before needle goes back to original, I'll be getting about 34/35mpg out of it.

I have to say it handles excellantly, like a tall car more than anything.

Congrats - 34/35 mpg is WAY better than I done with the next Generation one (02 - 06) I had.

In terms of handling, your right, they are more car like. It also helps that they've double wishbone suspension!

Best of luck with the car, I hope it serves you well.
jayok is offline  
Advertisement
01-03-2012, 21:22   #10
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
Thanks!

I was taking it easy on the way home, it was dark on roads I didn't know. It's a refreshing change from the beemers I've had!
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
02-03-2012, 10:27   #11
langdang
Closed Account
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 3,811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Slow IRL View Post
Picked up one (1998) yesterday, fuel consumption isn't that bad. I stuck €40 into her and drove about 130 miles. Put up another 20 miles today. If I can get 200 before needle goes back to original, I'll be getting about 34/35mpg out of it.

I have to say it handles excellantly, like a tall car more than anything.
Was away when you posted originally.
Had one, but a 00 one so it had the B20Z (150hp) engine rather than the B20.
30+ mpg, but very little town or motorway driving. On the odd occasion I had it on a motorway, I didn't notice much difference in mpg with just two people and zero load. Guzzled petrol when driven hard on the motorway fully loaded with adults and gear for a holidays. Meh.

Mechanic advised me to only use 5w30 semi synthetic in it - he reckons the number one cause of death in them is people either using the wrong oil or going way beyond service intervals and and clogging up the mesh filter in the sump.

Noisy backstards on rough Irish roads due to big-ish chunky-ish tyres and little noise insulation. Fair bit of induction noise from the B20z too.

Mine needed a new rad a few months in, the plastic (GRRRR!) section at the top had cracked just in front of where the top hose joins.

Is the clock working in yours (time clock in middle of dash?) - simple enough fix if you have a soldering iron.
The diff is fairly robust I'd say - mine was grinding and groaning when I bought it but perfect after 2 drains and refills of Honda DPF II. (<€30, + lidl torque wrench, handy job)

Clean the IACV if the idle is rough. Another fairly handy job.

If yours has the hardcover for the spare wheel, the zip is most likely half seized, the vinyl will be after shrinking a bit and the threads holding the zip to the vinyl will be a bit rotten. IE - if you take it off you will have an awful job getting it back on, and may just have to abandon it. Might make a good improvised bobsleigh if we get snow next year.


Drove a 02-06 model recently, much more refined, nicer interior etc. Found it even had more torque down low (gen 1 is very good for a NA petrol without variable valve timing tho!) so I thought the mpg would have been a bit better. I think they did gain about 100kg tho. Also, well out of bangernomics territory for another few years (depending on petrol prices Isuppose!)

Last edited by langdang; 02-03-2012 at 11:26. Reason: speeling
langdang is offline  
02-03-2012, 10:35   #12
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
Yeah, I did a little bit of research - the earlier 126bhp engine redlines at 6,3krpm while the newer 140bhp goes to 6,9krpm! I don't think the fuel consumption figures are vastly different between the 2.

Yes, clock is non functioning! What has to be soldered?

I'm aware of the grinding diff, and mine suffers from it. How long did you leave between diff oil changes before it went out of it? I used to work in a main dealership and it was a common occurence there - we just changed the oil and took it off-road to work the diff but it didn't make a lot of difference. (never saw one having to be replaced though, they just kept going!)
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
02-03-2012, 10:57   #13
langdang
Closed Account
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 3,811
Here for the clock. Hardest part is opening the bloody thing without breaking it.

I did the two fills in the one icy morning. Took it to a nearby industrial estate to exercise the diff (AKA scutting around on the ice ) in between the two fills.
The official procedure describes running all four wheels forwards and in reverse on a lift to "burnish the clutches". Scutting around on the ice was as close as I could get. You may have to make do with plenty of figure-of-8 turns in the absence of ice. Was quite impressed with the handling on icy tarmac with plain old summer tyres!

Perfect straightway afterwards, and still is, no noise when doing tight turns or anything.
Mine had 120k miles on it when I bought it, possibly at some stage it had an atypical Irish owner who actually did some preventative maintenance on it? IE may have been previously changed at 60-80k miles? Dunno, the old fluid looked VERY different to the fresh stuff!
langdang is offline  
Thanks from:
02-03-2012, 13:37   #14
Captain Slow IRL
Registered User
 
Captain Slow IRL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connaught
Posts: 3,367
I'm just after thinking, I was working on one before and reported the clock not working - pulled it out to check for live and earth, both present so advised new clock. Service advisor said it to the customer along with a price for a new one (wasn't cheap, think close to a ton!)

She comes storming back in then saying the clock was working and what were we trying to pull a fast one on her for? Whatever I done taking it out and back in must have rubbed the defective connections the right way!
Captain Slow IRL is offline  
02-03-2012, 13:58   #15
langdang
Closed Account
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 3,811
Turning on the heating to max temperature through those vents can expand things the right way to complete the circuit again I think. Temporary fix only.
langdang is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet