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26-03-2005, 13:14   #1
KTRIC
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Log homes in Ireland

Myself and the GF have been looking at this site http://www.goodwoodsolutions.com/ with the view building a log house on a plot in Kildare .

Has anyone had any expierience with these ?? And where would we start ? bearing in mind that we have never done any thing like this and wouldn't even know were to start/
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26-03-2005, 13:19   #2
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my mother's friend bought one a while back. She's chuffed with it, i think it cost her 30k!
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26-03-2005, 18:02   #3
kadman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Banta Fodder
Myself and the GF have been looking at this site http://www.goodwoodsolutions.com/ with the view building a log house on a plot in Kildare .

Has anyone had any expierience with these ?? And where would we start ? bearing in mind that we have never done any thing like this and wouldn't even know were to start/
Hi Banta Fodder,

You definitely have to do your research on this type of construction method , as you are probably aware, log cabin construction is definitely a rarity in Ireland. But personally I like them.

From a self build point of view, I think you are going to find it very difficult to find experienced labour available, to construct the kit for you. I say this, due to the unusual nature of the construction , and a couple of elements in the build, that are not readily appreciated by tradesmen engaged in normal timberframe methods, and definitely not in normal concrete / block construction.

The elements I refer to are settlement of the building, due to the material used. And the need to accomodate this movement by sliding methods of installing windows doors ect,

As your building is timber, it is going to move , and the fitting of windows and doors, needs to accommodate this movement. There is no point in fixing doos and windows , tight to heads, and then six to twelve months later your house settles 20mm, this settlement is going to open at the window and door heads. There are methods of fitting to accommodate this, but they require lengthy explanations, and no doubt your kit supplier will have the information you require.

I have seen a number of kit build log cabins, and some of the window, door fitting and weather proofing , leave a lot to be desired. And the initial plans left out some important details.You would need to get specific information regarding window , door weatherproofing details, and cill requirements, as well as roof spec, and then discuss these with a good architect. Some of queries I raised recently with a neighbour, who also built a log cabin, from a european supplier, should have been dealt with prior to the kit purchase, and not at the end of the build. Unfortunately for him he contacted me when his cabin was built. Bit too late then.

As I always say, research and more research, before you commit.

Would I reccommend this as a self build, Yeah, if RooferPete, Carpenter, myself, and any other experienced pro's were doing it.

You need your head screwed on for this one friend

sorry for the ranting,

kadman
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27-03-2005, 20:17   #4
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Log Homes in Ireland

Banta Fodder.

As Kadman says, its not a common build here, but there are a few
(hard to find) tradesmen around who would under take this.

I'm sure that Goodwood Solutions (seller) would reccommend installers and follow on trades if they did not undertake this themselves.

Would you consider building a traditional platform type construction Timber Frame kit, with Semi-Log cladding;.
--> Better thermal performance, easy to build, many expierenced trades to follow on, same visually/astethically.

I have seen some nice cabins in South Wicklow mts using canadian red cedar semi-log cladding on tf kits, beautiful....


YAPP
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28-03-2005, 09:23   #5
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Do you need planning permission for a log cabin ?
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28-03-2005, 12:10   #6
KTRIC
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Originally Posted by YAPP
Would you consider building a traditional platform type construction Timber Frame kit, with Semi-Log cladding;.
--> Better thermal performance, easy to build, many expierenced trades to follow on, same visually/astethically.

I have seen some nice cabins in South Wicklow mts using canadian red cedar semi-log cladding on tf kits, beautiful....


YAPP

I am looking at different solutions myself and that doesn't sound too bad, but herself has settled on a log build. Just have to convince her.

Realistically we are just trying to find an alternative to a 3 bed €300,000 shoe box in a cul-de-sac in Clondalkin.
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28-03-2005, 12:18   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Banta Fodder
I am looking at different solutions myself and that doesn't sound too bad, but herself has settled on a log build. Just have to convince her.

Realistically we are just trying to find an alternative to a 3 bed €300,000 shoe box in a cul-de-sac in Clondalkin.
I'd love to do the same myself, the only problem being finding a piece of land that is not in the middle of nowhere, and not priced at a level that only property developers can afford. It seems that most building plots anywhere near centres of civilisation in this country are snapped up by property developers eager to build as many yuppy appartments as possible to maximize their investment rather than being available to people who just want to build a house that has any degree of individuality and design to it.
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28-03-2005, 12:26   #8
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We have been looking at 0.5 acre sites in the likes of Naas etc for about 30k. Not bad and the commute on a bike to the city wouldn't take to long. The thing I keep telling myself is "I don't want to rent for the rest of my life".
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28-03-2005, 16:30   #9
Alun
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Banta Fodder
We have been looking at 0.5 acre sites in the likes of Naas etc for about 30k. Not bad and the commute on a bike to the city wouldn't take to long. The thing I keep telling myself is "I don't want to rent for the rest of my life".
That's pretty cheap ... pity I don't want to live in Naas though
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28-03-2005, 16:33   #10
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Yapps idea of an external cladded, traditional tf jit, is definitely a quicker more conventional form of construction , that will give you the same aesthetic look.

Conventional log cabin construction, using square planed all round machined moulded logs, are also insulated internally with horizonatal battens fixed at 400-600 centres and insulated between battens, so they should also perform well .

Western red cedar does look excellent visually, and is a very durable timber.
But its adw ( average dried weight) is only 23lb ft3 , compared to say Larch at 37lb ft3,. So it is regarded as one of the softest softwoods. This characteristic makes it a soft and brittle timber, that is very easily damaged.

It is with out doubt the easiest damaged timber apart from balsa wood.

So if you have children that are every bit as destructive as a delta force team, choose your cladding wisely.

But I have to agree with Yapp, this is a good route to go, even for self build, so long as you counter batten the external of your tf kit, to allow good ventilation , and air flow behind the cladding.

kadman

Good site explaining fundamental requirements in relation to external cladding, in particular pay attention to the single fixing in each board edge to allow movement across the width.


http://www.stourhead.com/external_cladding.htm
http://www.stourhead.com/species.htm

kadman

Last edited by kadman; 28-03-2005 at 17:04.
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29-03-2005, 13:36   #11
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TF Kit - LOG CABIN LOOK

Kadman,

Glad to see we do agree on something for once..

YAPP
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29-03-2005, 19:03   #12
kadman
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Originally Posted by YAPP
Kadman,

Glad to see we do agree on something for once..

YAPP
I think it's twice now , is it,

kadman
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21-05-2006, 18:07   #13
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I'm thinking of going down this route, anyone actually use these guys at GoodWood Solutions?
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22-05-2006, 08:49   #14
Lex Luthor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-TRIC
We have been looking at 0.5 acre sites in the likes of Naas etc for about 30k.


more like €230k in Naas for a 1/2 acre

on a side note and this is to kadman, do you think a surveyor that is specifically trained is required to do a snag list on a log cabin or would any surveyor do? I'll be needing one soon.

Last edited by Lex Luthor; 22-05-2006 at 10:24.
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31-05-2006, 10:39   #15
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One of my guys from Finland is an Engineer and is experienced with Log Cabins Lex, if you need somebody independent.

Last edited by Viking House; 31-05-2006 at 10:48.
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