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08-03-2020, 00:10   #1
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Coronavirus Pandemic Information- Local and Worldwide



While there are several threads already running across Boards, this is a thread where we can discuss the disease and it's implications from our perspectives and biased towards how it affects us, the people who live in the country.
This is to be a fact and information thread with news and science, rather than a chit-chat thread. The intention being to educate and help each other.
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08-03-2020, 00:17   #2
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Covid-19 is more infectious than the Flu.

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08-03-2020, 00:21   #3
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Mortality rate is less than SARS. However with the rate of spread, I believe the number of deaths has already exceeded that of SARS.


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08-03-2020, 00:24   #4
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The mortality rate is decreasing as treatments are refined and detection methods are improved and detect more infected people with milder versions.

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08-03-2020, 00:28   #5
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The death rate is higher in older people and those with pre-existing serious illnesses.
Elsewhere I read that even with pre-existing complaints if you are under 60 the chances of survival are 95%.


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08-03-2020, 00:31   #6
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Age is a significant factor in mortality rates.

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08-03-2020, 00:34   #7
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The rate of spread is important in limiting its effects. Hence the quarantine and social-distancing approaches.


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08-03-2020, 13:48   #8
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Sourced from https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...we-be-11948003
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08-03-2020, 14:05   #9
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Coronavirus: How does COVID-19 attack the human body?
By Tania Snuggs, news reporter

Wednesday 4 March 2020 18:06, UK

The most common signs that you may be infected with coronavirus are breathing problems, and that is because its first port of call is the lungs.

Just like the flu, coronaviruses are respiratory diseases and can spread when an infected patient coughs or sneezes, spraying small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus.

How coronavirus attacks cells in the lungs

Although just around two months old, experts are slowly discovering more about COVID-19, which appears to be attacking two specific sets of cells in the lungs, according to Professor Mark Fielder - a medical microbiologist at Kingston University.

Speaking to Sky News, he explains one is called a goblet cell and the other is called a ciliated cell.

He said: "A goblet cell produces mucus that makes a wet slimy layer on your respiratory tract, and that's important for helping you keep your lungs moist, which is needed to keep you healthy.


"The ciliated cells are cells that have little hairs on them that wave in an upward direction, so any nasty material that gets stuck in the mucus, such as bacteria and viruses, or particles of dust, gets swept up towards your throat.

"When you cough, you cough up mucus and swallow it and you dump that into the acid bath we call a stomach - that's the way things normally work."

But he says COVID-19 appears to be infecting those particular two sets of cells preferentially - "something that was seen similarly with SARS," he said.

SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, also originated in China, and killed 774 people following the 2002-2003 outbreak, far less than the almost 3,000 killed by COVID-19.

Professor Fielder added: "The problem we've got here, is the virus infects these cells and starts to kill them.

"And as it kills them as part of its replication process, tissue falls into the lungs, and the lungs start to get blockages - and that blockage might mean that the patient develops pneumonia."

Immune system 'goes haywire' and can damage healthy tissue

He says there is an added problem in that the immune system tries to react because it recognises the body is under attack.

"It can actually almost over attack, and become what we call hyperimmune, and set up a large attack which can then start to damage the healthy tissue underneath."

Prof Fielder also claims the body's efforts to fight the virus can cause inflammation in the lungs, which can make breathing even more difficult.

It is also suggested that the immune system "goes haywire", causing even more damage to the organ and other parts of the tissue.

He said: "Once the virus has got into the pneumonic state in the lungs, it can start causing problems in the air sacs in the blood vessels in your lungs - commonly wrapped around the almost broccoli shaped organs in the lungs, called the alveoli.

"These are really important in normal breathing to help the body exchange carbon dioxide for oxygen under normal breathing, and these are very delicate, and can get damaged and limit your capability of oxygenating blood."

And he adds that it is not only the lungs that are attacked by the virus.

Coronavirus also attacks other important organs

COVID-19 can also target the kidneys - the two bean-shaped organs which filter toxins from our blood.

He says it they are not functioning properly, it could lead to organ failure and the patient "is going to struggle to hang on to life".
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08-03-2020, 14:28   #10
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;https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ading-covid-19



Can a face mask stop it spreading? Coronavirus facts checked

The truth about how easy it is to catch Covid-19, who is vulnerable and what you can do to avoid infection.

Claim: ‘Face masks don’t work’

Wearing a face mask is certainly not an iron-clad guarantee that you won’t get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, known as aerosols, can penetrate masks. However, masks are effective at capturing droplets, which is a main transmission route of coronavirus, and some studies have estimated a roughly fivefold protection versus no barrier alone (although others have found lower levels of effectiveness).

If you are likely to be in close contact with someone infected, a mask cuts the chance of the disease being passed on. If you’re showing symptoms of coronavirus, or have been diagnosed, wearing a mask can also protect others. So masks are crucial for health and social care workers looking after patients and are also recommended for family members who need to care for someone who is ill – ideally both the patient and carer should have a mask.

However, masks will probably make little difference if you’re just walking around town or taking a bus so there is no need to bulk-buy a huge supply.

Claim: it is mutating into a more deadly strain

All viruses accumulate mutations over time and the virus that causes Covid-19 is no different. How widespread different strains of a virus become depends on natural selection – the versions that can propagate quickest and replicate effectively in the body will be the most “successful”. This doesn’t necessarily mean most dangerous for people though, as viruses that kill people rapidly or make them so sick that they are incapacitated may be less likely to be transmitted.


Genetic analysis by Chinese scientists of 103 samples of the virus, taken from patients in Wuhan and other cities, suggests that early on two main strains emerged, designated L and S. Although the L strain appeared to be more prevalent than the S strain (about 70% of the samples belonged to the former), the S branch of the virus was found to be the ancestral version.

The team behind this research suggested that this may indicate the L strain is more “aggressive”, either transmitting more easily or replicating faster inside the body. However, this theory is speculative at this stage – there haven’t yet been direct comparisons to see whether people who catch one version of the virus are more likely to pass it on or suffer more severe symptoms.

Claim: ‘It is no more dangerous than winter flu’

Many individuals who get coronavirus will experience nothing worse than seasonal flu symptoms, but the overall profile of the disease, including its mortality rate, looks more serious. At the start of an outbreak the apparent mortality rate can be an overestimate if a lot of mild cases are being missed. But this week, a WHO expert suggested that this has not been the case with Covid-19. Bruce Aylward, who led an international mission to China to learn about the virus and the country’s response, said the evidence did not suggest that we were only seeing the tip of the iceberg. If borne out by further testing, this could mean that current estimates of a roughly 1% fatality rate are accurate. This would make Covid-19 about 10 times more deadly than seasonal flu, which is estimated to kill between 290,000 and 650,000 people a year globally.


Claim: ‘It only kills the elderly, so younger people can relax’

Most people who are not elderly and do not have underlying health conditions will not become critically ill from Covid-19. But the illness still has a higher chance of leading to serious respiratory symptoms than seasonal flu and there are other at-risk groups – health workers, for instance, are more vulnerable because they are likely to have higher exposure to the virus. The actions that young, healthy people take, including reporting symptoms and following quarantine instructions, will have an important role in protecting the most vulnerable in society and in shaping the overall trajectory of the outbreak.

Claim: ‘You need to be with an infected person for 10 minutes’

For flu, some hospital guidelines define exposure as being within six feet of an infected person who sneezes or coughs for 10 minutes or longer. However, it is possible to be infected with shorter interactions or even by picking the virus up from contaminated surfaces, although this is thought to be a less common route of transmission.

Claim: ‘A vaccine could be ready within a few months’

Scientists were quick out of the gates in beginning development of a vaccine for the new coronavirus, helped by the early release of the genetic sequence by Chinese researchers. The development of a viable vaccine continues apace, with several teams now testing candidates in animal experiments. However, the incremental trials required before a commercial vaccine could be rolled out are still a lengthy undertaking – and an essential one to ensure that even rare side-effects are spotted. A commercially available vaccine within a year would be quick.

Claim: ‘If a pandemic is declared, there is nothing more we can do to stop the spread’

A pandemic is defined as worldwide spread of a new disease – but the exact threshold for declaring one is quite vague. In practice, the actions being taken would not change whether or not a pandemic is declared. Containment measures are not simply about eliminating the disease altogether. Delaying the onset of an outbreak or decreasing the peak is crucial in allowing health systems to cope with a sudden influx of patients.

© 2020 Guardian News & Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.
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08-03-2020, 14:39   #11
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Excerpts from:
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-...octor/12024042

What are the symptoms?
Most people who are infected by coronavirus feel like they have a common cold.

The most common symptoms are fever, sore throat, dry cough and fatigue but some also have headaches, nasal congestion or a runny nose.

Diarrhea and nausea have also been reported but are less common.

Symptoms will generally appear three to four days after exposure to the virus but can be up to 14 days later.

In serious cases, the symptoms will be similar to influenza, Dr Rawlinson said.

"They may see changes on their X-ray, they might get pneumonia," Dr Rawlinson said.

"Some, at the much more severe end, will need to go to ICU but that is a very small percentage."

Although it is less likely, some people who contract COVID-19 don't develop any symptoms or feel unwell in any way.

Those under 18 are less susceptible to the virus, according to the limited clinical reports available.

Dr Rawlinson says those over 65 are at higher risk of more severe symptoms as are those with pre-existing conditions like heart disease or asthma.

However, the mortality rate is highest among people over 80.

As opposed to the influenza outbreak in 2009, pregnant women do not seem to be at greater risk of contracting coronavirus.

When will I recover?
About 80 per cent of people recover from the disease without any special treatment.

"If [you] have COVID-19, don't be overwhelmed by it. By far and away, people are recovering well," Dr Rawlinson said.

Most people with minor symptoms will be told to quarantine themselves at home, keep up fluids and take paracetamol to control their temperature.

Australian patients have generally recovered in about four weeks, Dr Rawlinson said.

The people who suffer more severe symptoms may require hospital admission, where they will be cared for in a negative pressure ward and might be given intravenous fluids or oxygen in more serious cases.

Some may develop an infection in their lower respiratory tract which could lead to pneumonia.

These patients would be treated in an intensive care unit where high-flow oxygen may be administered or they may be intubated.

Severe pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure, which is the leading cause of death from coronavirus.
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08-03-2020, 14:49   #12
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The bit about 60% alcohol in wipes could be important to know.

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Can a coronavirus be prevented or avoided?
Try to avoid people who are sick or meeting in large groups. Stay home if you are sick.

Cover your cough with a tissue or cough into your upper sleeve or elbow. Do not cough into your hands.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your mouth, nose, or eyes.
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08-03-2020, 14:54   #13
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Thanks Greysides, excellent stuff.
Really think the country needs to examine lockdown. Foot and Mouth + type approach. This approach esp where there is community spread.
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08-03-2020, 17:32   #14
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Case in the Bon Secours in Cork also;
https://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/...rs-986546.html
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09-03-2020, 00:44   #15
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HSE Advice:

Close contact

This is only a guide but close contact can mean:

spending more than 15 minutes face-to-face contact within 2 metres of an infected person
living in the same house or shared accommodation as an infected person

Anyone with symptoms of coronavirus who has been in close contact with a confirmed case in the last 14 days should:

isolate themselves from other people - this means going into a different, well-ventilated room alone, with a phone

phone their GP, or emergency department

in a medical emergency (if you have severe symptoms) phone 112 or 999
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