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27-05-2014, 20:41   #1
Seaniemac
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I want to Buy Shares.

Hi, I have €5,000 and I would like to buy some shares in something just to see if I could make a few bob. I have never had a share in anything and I haven`t a clue as to how to buy a share or sell one. I would like to do all of this Online and it was said to me that maybe I should look at the American or British markets. I would really appreciate some advice and direction on this.
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28-05-2014, 06:02   #2
househero
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Hi, I have €5,000 and I would like to buy some shares in something just to see if I could make a few bob. I have never had a share in anything and I haven`t a clue as to how to buy a share or sell one. I would like to do all of this Online and it was said to me that maybe I should look at the American or British markets. I would really appreciate some advice and direction on this.
My advice to you.

Is don't do it.

You have no idea. Go do some research for 3 years. Play with fake money on a real stock exchange (most big sites have these fantasy portfolios) then you Will a. Realise the market is not great for beginners right now. B. Easy to loose money. C. Hard to make it.
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29-05-2014, 16:39   #3
 
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Hi, I have €5,000 and I would like to buy some shares in something just to see if I could make a few bob. I have never had a share in anything and I haven`t a clue as to how to buy a share or sell one. I would like to do all of this Online and it was said to me that maybe I should look at the American or British markets. I would really appreciate some advice and direction on this.
Hi buddy,

When I wanted to get started I visited the Investopedia website which has some great intros and an imaginary stock market simulator which I found really useful.

If you want to learn a little more about Financial Theory in general, MIT Openware does a great free course using video lectures, which I'm taking at the moment, it's really useful when it comes to learning about stocks, bonds, equities etc. That way you can learn about different investment instruments and see what works for you. For instance you might want to buy government bonds which are very safe but don't offer a very high rate of return.

A couple of books I really enjoyed too were, "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" (more to do with becoming financially independent in general terms, "A random walk down Wall Street" and "Beating the Street" by Peter Lynch.

Probably the best way to learn though is to try joining an investment club if there's one in your area (or start your own!) that way you can learn from each other and also save on commission when buying shares through doing it together.

Naturally if you have any further questions feel free to come on here. Best of luck with your investment.
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31-05-2014, 23:41   #4
Voltex
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OP..try out virtual trading platforms first. Bullbearings.co.uk is pretty good.
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08-08-2014, 02:09   #5
tennisfennis
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My advice to you.

Is don't do it.

You have no idea. Go do some research for 3 years. Play with fake money on a real stock exchange (most big sites have these fantasy portfolios) then you Will a. Realise the market is not great for beginners right now. B. Easy to loose money. C. Hard to make it.
This is the BEST FREE advice you can hope to ever get. Please follow it
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08-08-2014, 15:00   #6
househero
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This is the BEST FREE advice you can hope to ever get. Please follow it
& I hope he did. DOW down nearly 5% in 3 weeks and looking unhealthy going in to the summer lull. Would have been a great way to watch the market falling (with imaginary money). Instead of loosing his hard earned money to a frothy market.
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10-08-2014, 20:12   #7
Seaniemac
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I took all the Advice and I didn`t buy. I think I might drink it instead ;-)
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10-08-2014, 20:14   #8
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Amazing noone here can ever give a straight answer on how to buy a few shares. Are ye all a little lost or what?
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10-08-2014, 20:21   #9
Sonnenblumen
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Amazing noone here can ever give a straight answer on how to buy a few shares. Are ye all a little lost or what?
You have the stage, let's hear it from you or do you also have Kindergarten Q's?
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10-08-2014, 20:31   #10
Seaniemac
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You have the stage, let's hear it from you or do you also have Kindergarten Q's?
I wouldn`t consider my question a "Kindergarten Q" as you put it. If you haven`t anything civil to say, don`t say anything at all.....
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11-08-2014, 09:00   #11
tommylimerick
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the first share I bought instead of going drinking or buying a car turned into a five bagger
it could have gone higher but the shareholders ****eed it up
I say op you are young and can ttake more risks than a pensioner might
that is why a pensioner would have a lot more of their money in bonds than shares
so you should go high risk in a technology company or something that takes your eye in the next couple of months
I invest in companies sometimes where I have had a good experience or new product
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11-08-2014, 11:27   #12
 
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I wouldn`t consider my question a "Kindergarten Q" as you put it. If you haven`t anything civil to say, don`t say anything at all.....
Hi Seanie,

I've started a suggested "Broker Review" thread here in the Investment and Markets forums. I haven't posted in a while as I've only just set up an account with the Belgian bank Keytrade and am still waiting to hear from TD Direct Investing who apparently mistakenly refused my application and are happy to let me open an account.

I think the main difficulty for anyone getting started are that you need to have an understanding of basic financial theory to have an appreciation of risk and you need to get some money together to invest in the first place - naturally you've taken care of the latter of the two!

As I'm sure you already know, the level of return on investment is usually commensurate with the level of risk.

If you're still in your twenties like me (barely! :-D) then I would suggest putting 20% into bonds and 80% into shares. Personally I split my money equally between Vanguard index funds - you can google these if you like.

In a nutshell, Vanguard operates on a not for profit basis and therefore the cost to you of buying shares in one of their ETF's are fairly minimal. They do have ones which follow government bonds which of course are safe, given that the government can simply print more money or raise taxes to pay them off rather than default.

This is a mechanical and fairly boring way to invest but if you do have a read of 'A random walk down Wall Street' you'll see that investing in a broad index fund over the years has proven a far better return on your investment than sinking your money into this or that mutual fund.

Naturally, this is a way of growing your wealth in the long term but if like me you want to retire at 60, you do have some time on your hands to play around with.

If you do ever change your mind and want to open a brokerage account, feel free to have a look on the forums or send me a message.
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11-08-2014, 18:24   #13
Sonnenblumen
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I wouldn`t consider my question a "Kindergarten Q" as you put it. If you haven`t anything civil to say, don`t say anything at all.....
I was actually quite civil, I probably just have a low tolerance of piss artists, tyre kickers etc
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11-08-2014, 22:27   #14
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Hi, I have €5,000 and I would like to buy some shares in something just to see if I could make a few bob. I have never had a share in anything and I haven`t a clue as to how to buy a share or sell one. I would like to do all of this Online and it was said to me that maybe I should look at the American or British markets. I would really appreciate some advice and direction on this.
if i were you i would buy an index fund , look up this one

VEUR , its an index which covers europe , european stocks are better value than american ones right now
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12-08-2014, 16:40   #15
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Listen - not that I'm disagreeing with anything that's been said on here, but please don't take your investment advice from people on forums talking about value. Do your own research and come to your own conclusions.

When I started out I didn't have a clue either, and the reason people like us have a hard time figuring it out is because it's obviously so difficult to get a straight answer - look at this thread - someone asks "how do I buy shares", and it's 12 posts before the word "stockbroker" is mentioned.

To ANSWER your question -

You'll need a stockbroker to purchase shares or ETFs. These come in many forms - the large banks, well known brokerages such as Goodbody's, Davy's etc, or online ones. They have a range of different costs and service offerings - cheap online brokers are purely "transactional" - i.e. they'll give you no advice on what to do, whereas "goldplated", "bricks & mortar" stockbrokers will offer guidance (often at a hefty cost).

Most cheap online brokers (e.g. based in UK/Europe/US) don't allow Irish customers, so the choice is relatively few and there are many threads on here debating the merits of each.

Not all stockbrokers offers access to every stock/fund/exchange, so check that the stock you wish to buy is actually available before signing up.

The next thing to be aware of is currency - you have euros, but US stocks are bought in dollars, UK stocks in sterling, etc. Stockbrokers will change your currency for you - but for a fee. You are best off planning and managing this yourself.

We are all investing/trading because we want to make money so my main advice would be - watch your costs. These can easily eat up profit (if there is any!) and make all of your efforts a waste of time.

Investopedia is a great resource, as others have said. I also read "monevator" and "bogleheads" as they fit with my personal strategy.

Other than that - be careful and god speed!
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