Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
04-08-2010, 19:12   #1
Shelli2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 690
Furnished / Squatters rights.

I am currently looking for a house to rent. I have a lot of my own furniture and other bits and pieces. My Dad (who is a landlord himself on another property) says that most places won't let you bring your own furniture as this gives you squatters rights and it's hard to get rid of tenants if they cause trouble, don't pay etc.
I'm not entirely convinced by this.
Can anyone shed some light on the subject?

I know that with places that are already furnished the landlord may not want to remove a lot of stuff that he would then have to store, but I have been in contact with one or two places that are currently being redecorated, are advertised as furnished but the furniture has not yet been purchased. Surely me having my own stuff would save the landlord some time and money??
Shelli2 is offline  
Advertisement
04-08-2010, 19:47   #2
J-blk
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 3,895
I very much doubt it has anything to do with squatters' rights TBH. It takes something like 12 years to gain squatters' rights AFAIK and a tenant/landlord relationship with a lease and regular rent payments would work against gaining any such rights, etc.

I'm not sure what the deal is with the places you've seen that are currently un-furnished and intend to get furniture in, but for most places here it's just the "norm" and probably easiest for most landlords to rent places out that way (I still find this odd TBH, as I've lived in other mainland Europe countries and it is normal for almost every place to be completely un-furnished, no appliances or anything even).
J-blk is offline  
04-08-2010, 21:36   #3
the_syco
Registered User
 
the_syco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 34,897
There's an "unfurnished" search option on Daft.ie
the_syco is offline  
04-08-2010, 23:22   #4
Xiney
Registered User
 
Xiney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 7,631
that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

We have quite a bit of our own furniture - on account of most apartments having no bookcases, desks, dvd shelves etc. We even have our own coffee table since one place didn't have one (bizarre!)
Xiney is offline  
Thanks from:
05-08-2010, 00:16   #5
JuliusCaesar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,776
AFAIK, an unfurnished flat entitles the tenant to greater rights. Unfurnished means no beds, no chairs - no basic furniture. You may be able to ask a LL to allow you move in your own furniture (or supplementary bits and pieces) but the flat/apartment will still be let 'furnished'.
JuliusCaesar is offline  
Advertisement
05-08-2010, 01:02   #6
John C
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 326
Unfurnished flats are majority in Germany

Where I live most of the rented flats are unfurnished at the time of letting.
When people move in, they bring their own furniture, crockery, cutlery, kettles and more.
In my first unfurnished flat there was neither a tap nor drainage in the kitchenette. I hired a plumber at my own expense.

I have read only a few legal cases here where a landlord sues for rent arrears and even eviction. Furnished or unfurnished was only secondary or not mentioned.

The factors a judge asks:
- what was agreed in the written rental agreement
- how much does this tenant really owe
- how many dependents has the tenant

- his ability to pay these arrears
among other questions

Germany is not Ireland.

Last edited by John C; 05-08-2010 at 18:38. Reason: Entering a missing word
John C is offline  
05-08-2010, 01:05   #7
Victor
Registered User
 
Victor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 72,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliusCaesar View Post
AFAIK, an unfurnished flat entitles the tenant to greater rights.
I've never heard of anything like this.
Victor is offline  
05-08-2010, 10:57   #8
shoegirl
Registered User
 
shoegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiney View Post
that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

We have quite a bit of our own furniture - on account of most apartments having no bookcases, desks, dvd shelves etc. We even have our own coffee table since one place didn't have one (bizarre!)
Same here. The bareness of many flats on my leaving sometimes shocked me. It goes beyond coffee tables too, in my last place there was nothing in the bedroom beyond a bed and wardrobe and some tiny shelving - not even a chest of drawers, nothing. Its very common.

Most landlords don't think very much about furnishings. Often they just throw in old furniture they don't want, or something very cheap, and don't replace it until tenants complain. Minimal is very common, esp in places with little space.
shoegirl is offline  
05-08-2010, 15:28   #9
conorhal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 6,367
In contrast to places like Germany most flats here are advertised as furnished, I can't imagine it's a problem if you have some of your own stuff, and it does not afford you squatters rights, plenty of people bring items of furniture with them, from study desks to book cases.

As to why a landlord would be reluctant to have a tenant furnish a place that has been advertised as furnished, from personal experience people can have a habit of leaving behind (dumping) old furniture that will then cost a landlord money to remove. Also, what does a landlord do with the existing furniture? I highly doubt that they would want to go to the expense and hassle of putting it in to storage to accommodate your furniture so you would be better off looking to rent a place unfurnished.

Most places are rented furnished because that's the easiest way to let them, unlike Germany we don't have a renting culture where people see their rented accomodation as their home rather then a temporary stop gap to buying.

Last edited by Victor; 05-08-2010 at 20:24. Reason: [COLOR=black] [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]
conorhal is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
05-08-2010, 16:55   #10
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,689
I must admit, I have heard that (from my Dad too!) about unfurnished tenancies giving more security to the tenant but I've never been able to find anything which proves it's more than a myth. So I suspect it USED to be the case that there were implications for security of tenancy.

As conor said, the attitude to renting in Ireland is different from that of continental Europe where long term renting is common whereas in Ireland people opt(ed) to buy rather than rent for a long time. In France most places would only have a kitchen sink and bathroom fittings, that's it!

It's simply easier to rent out a furnished flat when you know that most people do not have their own furniture and you'll probably be looking for another tenant in 1-2 years. A landlord might accommodate a tenant who wishes to move in their own furniture but I would imagine it would be a bit of a headache.
LittleBook is offline  
05-08-2010, 18:01   #11
antoinolachtnai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,473
Send a message via AIM to antoinolachtnai Send a message via Yahoo to antoinolachtnai
There used to be more tenancy rights for unfurnished but this distinction appears to have been removed by the 2004 Act.

There is some unfurnished rental stock in the posher areas of Dublin but do not be surprised if there is a premium to it.

There is just not that much Market for unfurnished accommodation.

Still if you find a landlord who is renovating and has no existing furniture he would certainly be happy to defer buying furniture until the second let.
antoinolachtnai is offline  
06-08-2010, 08:16   #12
conorhal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 6,367
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleBook View Post
I must admit, I have heard that (from my Dad too!) about unfurnished tenancies giving more security to the tenant but I've never been able to find anything which proves it's more than a myth. So I suspect it USED to be the case that there were implications for security of tenancy.

As conor said, the attitude to renting in Ireland is different from that of continental Europe where long term renting is common whereas in Ireland people opt(ed) to buy rather than rent for a long time. In France most places would only have a kitchen sink and bathroom fittings, that's it!

It's simply easier to rent out a furnished flat when you know that most people do not have their own furniture and you'll probably be looking for another tenant in 1-2 years. A landlord might accommodate a tenant who wishes to move in their own furniture but I would imagine it would be a bit of a headache.
I find the continental method a bit mad, a mate of mine was renting in Munich a few years back and he had to buy everything from the previous tenant, and I mean everything from the fitted kitchen cupboards to the light fixtures. If he moved it was his intention to sell them on to the next tenant, but what if you couldn't find somebody to buy? Renting a place like that is a bit like buying half a house, so you'd want to be renting long term because if your a highly mobile migrant then renting on the continent is an awful lot of hassle.

Last edited by Victor; 06-08-2010 at 20:26. Reason: [/COLOR] [COLOR=black][/COLOR]
conorhal is offline  
06-08-2010, 11:59   #13
bugler
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,395
Send a message via ICQ to bugler
The Irish rental market is geared toward a transient tenant who probably won't stay put for longer than a couple of years at most. There is little thought given to grown adults who might be willing to rent by choice.

Instead, renting is viewed as something only people who can't afford to buy do. There is a generally low opinion of renters (view any residents newsletter). And they are likely to be students, or welfare recipients.

There are plenty of good rental properties around, it's a shame a lot of them are atrociously decorated for as little outlay as possible. But that is Ireland's renting culture.
bugler is offline  
06-08-2010, 12:01   #14
axer
Registered User
 
axer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 5,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by conorhal View Post
I find the continental method a bit mad, a mate of mine was renting in Munich a few years back and he had to buy everything from the previous tenant, and I mean everything from the fitted kitchen cupboards to the light fixtures. If he moved it was his intention to sell them on to the next tenant, but what if you couldn't find somebody to buy? Renting a place like that is a bit like buying half a house, so you'd want to be renting long term because if your a highly mobile migrant then renting on the continent is an awful lot of hassle.
I did Germany too and when we moved into our apartment there wasn't even light bulb fittings not to mention light bulbs. It was a pain in the ass for us as we had to buy a full kitchen too and to make things worse it meant repainting the kitchen even though we were in that particular apartment only 6 months.

Last edited by Victor; 06-08-2010 at 20:27. Reason: [/COLOR]
axer is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet