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05-09-2009, 00:07   #1
Jakub25
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The Metal Detecting Debate. Keep all your MD questions and querys here!

What you think about this page?

http://www.md-ireland.com/

and about WoW in Great Britain.

http://www.weekendwanderersdetecting...mer_rally.html

I know using metal detector here in ireland is illegal.

Last edited by Riamfada; 12-09-2009 at 13:45.
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05-09-2009, 12:22   #2
Riamfada
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Interesting .... but illegal.

There’s an unbelievable amount of treasure under the ground just waiting to be discovered.

Throughout history, armies have invaded Ireland and the resulting wars, battles and skirmishes have resulted in countless valuables and the remains of war being scattered on the ground only to disappear below the surface.
Many old villages/settlements which disapeerd a long time ago, are awaiting to be discovered.


Would say the owner is contacted
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06-09-2009, 23:52   #3
Jakub25
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Read this it isn't 100% illegal.


The Law in Ireland
Here in the Republic of Ireland, the law is quite different. Nobody is allowed to search for archaeological artifacts with a metal detector, unless they have a license from the relevant State body. In practice, only qualified archaeologists are granted such a license. Due to the amount of heritage material which is reputed to have been illegally excavated and sold for profit, sanctions against those who break the Republic's laws are severe: a maximum of five years imprisonment and/or a fine not exceeding £50,000 on indictment.

Detectorists' Obligations
Government spokespersons have always assured the Metal Detecting Society of Ireland that it is not the intention of Government to be unreasonable in the treatment of detector hobbyists, provided they do not break the law. This assurance is reflected, to some extent, in the fact that a Garda may seize, without warrant, any detection device being used on or near archaeologically listed areas, but may not do so in any other area. This does not mean, however, that detectors may be used indiscriminately in all areas other than those listed as archaeologically significant; there are many undiscovered archaeological sites, and a detectorist who comes across such a site should report it within the statuary four days, and do nothing to interfere with it. The same requirement of reporting within four days also applies to any individual archaeological object found in the State.

Advice to Detectorists
Put simply, archaeology is best left to archaeologists. Hobby detectorists will always have plenty of beaches, parks, swimming areas, and other non-sensitive places to go 'coinshooting'. A responsible attitude must also be taken to the prohibition of detecting 'on', 'near', or 'in the vicinity of' prohibited areas. These terms are not defined in Law, and at a meeting with the Department of Art, Culture and the Gaeltacht, MDSI committee members suggested a 'safety limit' of one half kilometer from the outer boundary of any prohibited area. Department officials stated that they could not accept this as a voluntary code, as the terms 'at, near, or in the vicinity of' could only be properly interpreted in a legal context and on an individual basis.

The best advice we can give to Irish metal detector users is:

Do not detect anywhere near archaeological sites.
Do not detect on anyone's land without permission
Observe the basic courtesies of the countryside by closing gates and not damaging crops.
If you find an archaeological object - or site - report it immediately to your local Garda station or to the National Museum of Ireland. Phone 1890 MUSEUM (1890 - 687386)
If you are uncertain of the area you want to detect, contact your local Garda station for advice.
For More Information...
Relevant literature on the subject is the National Monuments Act of 1930, and the amendments to it in 1954, 1987, and 1994. Copies of these documents are available from the Government Publications Office in Molesworth St, Dublin 2.


So you think it is still illegal???
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07-09-2009, 11:21   #4
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We have had a discussion on this and i really dont want to get into it.

Metal detecting to find "treasure" on archaeological sites not currently afforded archaeological protection with the purpose of finding archaeological objects.

Perhaps you should confine yourself to the beach and the park?
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07-09-2009, 22:37   #5
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In my city there is a lot of land away from any castles and monasteries.
Now it' is green passture and maybe after 2 years there will stand buldings.
I think there can be a lot of coins and others and everything
will be destroyed.You know those finds are part of history of this city.
I can't look at this, archeologists havent enought people
to check everything.
Can I use metal detector around old houses from XX?

What kind of coins I can keep?
Coins and artefacts after 1800 can I keep or not?
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07-09-2009, 22:42   #6
Riamfada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakub25 View Post
In my city there is a lot of land away from any castles and monasteries.
Now it' is green passture and maybe after 2 years there will stand buldings.
I think there can be a lot of coins and others and everything
will be destroyed.
There is alot more archaeology in this country than just that close to castles and monastaries. If there is construction taking place archaeologists will have moved in and inspected the area to begin with so it wont be lost or destroyed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakub25 View Post
I can't look at this, archeologists havent enought people
to check everything.
Are you qualified to examine and conserve artefacts that come out of the ground and then hand them over to the museum or keep the collection private?
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08-09-2009, 19:35   #7
Jakub25
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Are you qualified to examine and conserve artefacts that come out of the ground and then hand them over to the museum or keep the collection private?
Yes, I will give back to museum everything what I will find
in Ireland.I thinking about this course under but I'm not sure
maybe it is only for archeologists.

http://www.earthsound.ie/
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10-09-2009, 14:14   #8
PJW
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There is alot more archaeology in this country than just that close to castles and monastaries. If there is construction taking place archaeologists will have moved in and inspected the area to begin with so it wont be lost or destroyed.
Archaeologists are bound to produce a report for planning purposes where construction will take place in a archaeloly sensitive area, in most cases this is just a paper exercise.

e.g. 18mths ago in the centre of Dublin on a one arce site close to Chrischurch an Archaeologists was required to produce a report, this entailed 2 No. 5M slit trenches been dug by the builder. The Archaeologists spent the morning in the two holes and determined the site was good to go.

Throughout the course of constructing the basement / piles, alot of pottery and some coins where un-earthed by workers, if the site was metal detected prior to works I'm sure a lot more could have been found.

Last edited by PJW; 10-09-2009 at 14:20.
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11-09-2009, 13:08   #9
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Quote:
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Archaeologists are bound to produce a report for planning purposes where construction will take place in a archaeloly sensitive area, in most cases this is just a paper exercise.

e.g. 18mths ago in the centre of Dublin on a one arce site close to Chrischurch an Archaeologists was required to produce a report, this entailed 2 No. 5M slit trenches been dug by the builder. The Archaeologists spent the morning in the two holes and determined the site was good to go.

Throughout the course of constructing the basement / piles, alot of pottery and some coins where un-earthed by workers, if the site was metal detected prior to works I'm sure a lot more could have been found.

Correct me if i'm wrong but archaeologists can use metal detectors on a site under investigation if they want to.
Thus it was the site coordinators fault for not doing so.
It has nothing to do with if metal detectors are made legal for public use.
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11-09-2009, 17:01   #10
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Metal dectors are used on some Irish excavations when deemed to be necessary. Woodstown in Co. Waterford is one notable site were they were used with success. However their are alot of problems associated with their use. There is a very real danger of metal detectors be used to compensate for poor recognition and understanding of a sites soil stratigraphy. They simply aren't necessary on most sites.
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11-09-2009, 21:18   #11
Jakub25
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Metal dectors are used on some Irish excavations when deemed to be necessary.
That's wrong thinking Metal dectors should be used on every field, passture
and others sites where will stands new bulidngs.
Those sites should be checked perfect to prevent loosing artefacts.
In Poland was site close to old church
in center of city and after diging they took groun somewhere.
After this some metal detectorists
go to place where that soil was and checked that.
They found something about 100medieval coins
and they give those coins back to museum.
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11-09-2009, 21:41   #12
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I'd say alot more coins would be found if metal detecting was allowed in ireland...this was an organised hunt so it would be simple to have a member of the nat museme in attandance to record finds.
You see some people are trying to organising people.
First irish metal detecting site will be probably closed.

http://whois.domaintools.com/md-ireland.com

We can't change 1987rules only ouer goverment can do that.
In my opinion every bigger city should have metal detectorist club
and this club should coperate with archeologists.
License for using metal detector should be avalible for normal person,
after finishing some kind of training.You know conserve artefacts,
putting finds places to the map and others useful skills.
This will stop losing Archaeological context.
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11-09-2009, 22:01   #13
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In ireland is a lot of metal detecorists hobbysts.

http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.php?topic=102268.new
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12-09-2009, 01:38   #14
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Correct me if i'm wrong but archaeologists can use metal detectors on a site under investigation if they want to.
Thus it was the site coordinators fault for not doing so.
It has nothing to do with if metal detectors are made legal for public use.
Of course they can use them IF they want to but in many instanances they dont bother, why I dont know....( ) but for the planning site investigations I've withnessed over the years the Archaeologists are only interested in the trenches they've requested to be opened by the builder.

.....( I'll take a guess, the archaeologists probably feel that the planning inforcement is a pain in the neck and its not deemed to be "real archaeology" or sure the developer will get planning in the end and place a concrete slab over the site, or piff I would'nt touch a metal detector if bla bla bla,
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12-09-2009, 09:40   #15
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There will be no co-opperation as detactorists do not seem to grasp the concept of stratigraphy and contextualisation coupled with the fact that they do not seem to grasp the notion that they are damaging a site by removing metalic features. Sigh. However the practice of treasure hunting is widespread in Ireland.

It may progress to the english situation where NMI are forced to set up shop close to lines of people doing systamatic MD scans of the landscape requesting that people please come and show what they have taken so it can at least be documented.

There is alot more to archaeology than shiny things, hence the reason when they are rarely used.

The ignorance of people on that treasurenet forum is amazing.Ive seen more logical debates on stormfront
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