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30-04-2009, 17:37   #61
ionix5891
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Originally Posted by maninasia View Post
I'll not pretend to be an expert but it does look like a deliberate delay...the checks required would not even take 6 months let alone 2 years...I need to see the average processing time to make a firm conclusion.
the average processing time for naturalization is over 3 years now

heres an interesting stories from people i worked with about their experiences with Irish naturalization


one came in '94 applied in early naughties and got it in under 2 years


another came in '96, applied in '06 (thats 10 years in the state continuously living and working and paying taxes from about the time when people were still leaving the state), still waiting last i checked this person has excellent English with native accent, goes out on town like us irish, pays taxes, is of good character and is educated up to masters level . how can it take over 3 years to make a decision on that case and run background checks?


one has to wonder as in the uk the process is a couple of months ....

.

Last edited by ionix5891; 30-04-2009 at 17:42. Reason: typo
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01-05-2009, 05:09   #62
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That's a pity, 3 years is just WAY too long. I know they process them at different speeds according to if you are married to an Irish spouse, non-EU and EU citizen. It states this on the CitizensInformation website. Beyond that it's like a black hole as to what process the Ministry follows. BTW, why does the Ministry of Justice still decide immigration policy, I though that an Immigration Dept. was going to be set-up?
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01-05-2009, 05:12   #63
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double post
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01-05-2009, 05:41   #64
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Three years i way too long...what's the law regarding migrant workers (non-eu) sponsored in ireland, being allowed to remain in a ''resident'' sort of way? sorry, im living in australia at the moment and am using their terminology i know! I knew two people i worked in a pub with in dublin, one from ukraine one from South Africa, who had to apply for their visa every year even though they had been there, law abiding, tax paying for about 8 years. it just seems disgraceful to me that these people should be treated like this after acting as responsible society members for so long. my opinion, residency after two years law abiding and in employment. that really wouldn't be a whole heap of people given most of our immigrants are EU and not subject to same laws anyway. met so many bangladeshis in dublin just hanging on for their irish passport, felt bad for them that our f**k wit political establishment doesn't appreciate how much they love ireland and want to contibute. the system seems needlessly arbitrary and confrontational to me

/topic a bit i know
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02-05-2009, 02:13   #65
Abed
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That's a pity, 3 years is just WAY too long. I know they process them at different speeds according to if you are married to an Irish spouse, non-EU and EU citizen. It states this on the CitizensInformation website. Beyond that it's like a black hole as to what process the Ministry follows. BTW, why does the Ministry of Justice still decide immigration policy, I though that an Immigration Dept. was going to be set-up?
I really don't think it makes any difference if you are married to an Irish citizen regarding speeding up your application. (I'm married to an Irish citizen myself and have been waiting long enough). the only category with quicker procedures is refugees of which I know two people who had their applications processed in 8 months only. both of them were granted citizenship, non of them has ever worked!

Last edited by Abed; 02-05-2009 at 02:15.
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02-05-2009, 23:56   #66
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That's a pity, 3 years is just WAY too long. I know they process them at different speeds according to if you are married to an Irish spouse, non-EU and EU citizen. It states this on the CitizensInformation website. Beyond that it's like a black hole as to what process the Ministry follows. BTW, why does the Ministry of Justice still decide immigration policy, I though that an Immigration Dept. was going to be set-up?
that was lip service talk. cant see it happening to be honest. sure it will probably take another year, considering lisbon and the economy is to be dealt with, before the immigration bill of 2008 comes into power. (of course there is now a section in the department inis)
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03-05-2009, 00:13   #67
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that was lip service talk. cant see it happening to be honest. sure it will probably take another year, considering lisbon and the economy is to be dealt with, before the immigration bill of 2008 comes into power. (of course there is now a section in the department inis)
they are one of the few departments in government to turn a profit due to all the processing fees, i cant find the figures now but its a significant amount and can probably cover paying extra part time clerical staff (god forbid they hire more full time public sector workers with a job for life! pensions and all that)
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03-05-2009, 12:09   #68
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they are one of the few departments in government to turn a profit due to all the processing fees, i cant find the figures now but its a significant amount and can probably cover paying extra part time clerical staff (god forbid they hire more full time public sector workers with a job for life! pensions and all that)
shhhooooo you will begin to start talking sense

sure once the application comes through, i think the applicant then has to pay circa €700 + before being sworn in, for the priviledge of citizenship.

but ye, its a bit of a money racket alright, ya would not want to be losing your green card whilst on the lash etc €100 a pop
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05-05-2009, 15:34   #69
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I know two people who had their applications processed in 8 months only. both of them were granted citizenship, non of them has ever worked!

Great just what the Country needs in exchange for Citizenship more waster on the take, more reason why stringent tests/interviews should be carried out before the value of an Irish Passport is granted.
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05-05-2009, 16:09   #70
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Great just what the Country needs in exchange for Citizenship more waster on the take, more reason why stringent tests/interviews should be carried out before the value of an Irish Passport is granted.
I'd have to say, being a person that has successfully naturalised, I think that the state should put some tests in place.

At the final stage of my naturalisation (preparing to appear in court), I was in a room surrounded by 20 or 30 other applicants.
The representative from the justice department stood at the front of the room giving instructions.
It was alarming how few people could even follow such a basic set of instructions...

The UK version is probably appropriate:
- knowing some history
- life in UK test
etc..
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06-05-2009, 14:32   #71
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My situation could only be given the nightmare status after giving Ireland 12 years of my life (1995-2008)

I studied in Dublin (Masters in IT, Bachelor in IT and MBA in business management) and worked full time in IT for 4 years (under college intership with the full knowledge of the immigration office)

I applied using Form5, collected it in October 2002 from the DOJ after meeting one of their officials. There were no notifications, no information either on their website nor on any documentation they provided of the impending changes of the naturalization law. (this information is confirmed by the DOJ by a request made under the Freedom of information act)

At that time (October 2002) I had 7 years residency and paid tax for 4 years, which was more than they required. By the time my application was received by their offices which was AFTER Novermber 2002 (11 days late) I was told in 2005 that I am not eligible since the law had changed, applicants who had years under student visas will not be counted, I had 7 years.

I fought them from 2005 until 2007, after having a high court case in may 2007, the Judge stated that the Minister would not have to notify the changes to the public!!! I lost. I am stuck in a gray area as I was told by the judge.

I tried contacting the Minister directly to look into my cas, but since they had been changing all the time (McDowell,Lenihan to Ahern). none seemed to care.

I was forced to leave everything in Dublin in jan 2008 (my life, all my belongings and even my Dog!) as my permit had expired and I did not wish to stay illegally.

Now I am trying to find employment in Ireland online, to return and build up my life form the start. I am divestated, upset and angry but this won't help me.

Is this fair? NO but what can I do!!!!
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06-05-2009, 14:47   #72
ionix5891
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My situation could only be given the nightmare status after giving Ireland 12 years of my life (1995-2008)

I studied in Dublin (Masters in IT, Bachelor in IT and MBA in business management) and worked full time in IT for 4 years (under college intership with the full knowledge of the immigration office)

I applied using Form5, collected it in October 2002 from the DOJ after meeting one of their officials. There were no notifications, no information either on their website nor on any documentation they provided of the impending changes of the naturalization law. (this information is confirmed by the DOJ by a request made under the Freedom of information act)

At that time (October 2002) I had 7 years residency and paid tax for 4 years, which was more than they required. By the time my application was received by their offices which was AFTER Novermber 2002 (11 days late) I was told in 2005 that I am not eligible since the law had changed, applicants who had years under student visas will not be counted, I had 7 years.

I fought them from 2005 until 2007, after having a high court case in may 2007, the Judge stated that the Minister would not have to notify the changes to the public!!! I lost. I am stuck in a gray area as I was told by the judge.

I tried contacting the Minister directly to look into my cas, but since they had been changing all the time (McDowell,Lenihan to Ahern). none seemed to care.

I was forced to leave everything in Dublin in jan 2008 (my life, all my belongings and even my Dog!) as my permit had expired and I did not wish to stay illegally.

Now I am trying to find employment in Ireland online, to return and build up my life form the start. I am divestated, upset and angry but this won't help me.

Is this fair? NO but what can I do!!!!
wow i feel really bad after reading that, what a disgrace the DOJ are, please do keep us updated this is just crazy
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08-05-2009, 12:26   #73
Abed
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Great just what the Country needs in exchange for Citizenship more waster on the take, more reason why stringent tests/interviews should be carried out before the value of an Irish Passport is granted.
I absolutely agree! I feel that the whole thing is being undervalued when I hear of such cases.

I speak both English and Irish and know more than most average Irish people about Itish history ...etc my wife is Irish, so is my daughter who goes to a gaelscoil , well paid job and two masters from Ireland. However someone who barely speaks English collecting SW every month is looked at more favourably in terms of processing time.

Absolute madness

Last edited by Abed; 08-05-2009 at 12:34.
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08-05-2009, 12:37   #74
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shhhooooo you will begin to start talking sense

sure once the application comes through, i think the applicant then has to pay circa €700 + before being sworn in, for the priviledge of citizenship.
€1000.00 a pop actually. Small price to pay for the priviledge of attaining citizenship in ones adopted country, in my view.

While I do agree the processing times are simply taking the piss, it's quite obvious they're sitting on the applications. Nobody can be that incompetent... I must say that I would prefer, and this from someone who's currently undergoing the process, that they were more strict/had some form of test/adopted or copied the UK version.

At present it seems it's simply a paper excersise to attain one's new passport.
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11-05-2009, 10:54   #75
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€1000.00 a pop actually. Small price to pay for the priviledge of attaining citizenship in ones adopted country, in my view.

While I do agree the processing times are simply taking the piss, it's quite obvious they're sitting on the applications. Nobody can be that incompetent... I must say that I would prefer, and this from someone who's currently undergoing the process, that they were more strict/had some form of test/adopted or copied the UK version.

At present it seems it's simply a paper excersise to attain one's new passport.
Hi Mena,
No one is paying just €1000.00 only to apply for this so called privilege.
On average every applicant IN PROCESS is waiting for almost 8 years and is LEGAL TAX PAYING Residence. You can count how much most of High Skilled Immigrants (which account for majority of immigrants from NON-EEA countries) have contributed to this adopted country = 8x12x1000 and many more in VAT's n what not.
For what, yea limitless amount of immigration visits to Long waits in queues and 3 years + wait for Naturalisation (Keep in mind naturalisation's very first check is Legality i.e. how long legally one has been in Ireland)
As for test/adopted country.... if you meant Irish History fair enough thats a valid thing... If u meant Irish Language... I wont mind... but language seem to have lost in own cause... I work under HSE and not a single word of Gaelic is spoken.. So why to force another paper exercise.
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