Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
30-05-2006, 11:40   #1
delly
Radiator
 
delly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,833
Garden Drainage: Start to finish

Ok, I’ve mentioned that I had been sorting my garden out on the odd thread here and there, and last weekend I finally finished. So the following is what I did from start to finish. I’m not saying it will work for everybody, but it may give people a direction to start from.

The garden is 9m wide by 7m long, with a large wall to the back as the house behind me is on higher ground. I got the house in December 2004 and it was pretty clear from the first time I went into the garden that the drainage would be a problem. I was quoted €3,000 to have the garden sorted, so I decided to have a go myself

13/06/05

This pic shows the garden before I did any major work. The previous owner had cut some railway sleepers up and had used them as steps to the shed which I have filled in. The shed itself was surrounded by some trellis which was held in place by 2x4 steaks which had been concreted in.

13/06/05

This gives a better look at the holes left after I had dug the concrete out. The hole in the bottom right was from two concrete posts that I merged together to form my soakaway hole. As I dug this hole, after about .4 of a metre, I had to use a pick axe to make any progress as the clay was too hard. After a metre, the muck turned into regular soft muck which was no problem. In the end the depth is about 1.4 metres. Note the water in the hole on the left, this is from rain from over a week previous, whereas over the Winter the big hole filled up a few times with heavy rain, but drained off after a number of days.

21/07/05

I have cleared the grass at this stage, rotivated it and have started on the trenches which will lead to the big hole. Looking back I may have got a couple of the directions wrong, as the slopes are not the best.

4/03/06

After my Winter break I got stuck in and made some good progress. This is just before the pipes stage

5/03/06

The piping which I used was made by Wavin and is perforated with about a 10cm diameter. At the join points I cut the end of the joining part in two, and tie wrapped it to the main pipe in the middle.

5/03/06

This shows how I laid the pipes a bit better. On the base of the trench I placed the same type of material to stop weeds growing in flowerbeds, as it will stop the soil getting into the stones, but will allow water to flow threw. I’m told that this material will degrade over a number of years, but I think it’s the only thing that can be used to stop the two mixing. The stones I used are 20mm in size and come in 20KG bags.

11/03/06

This shows the main hole being filled up with the rougher type rubble at the bottom. As I got to the top, I mixed in the smaller stones. You can just make out some chicken wire around the edge as well; I used this on top of the porous material to give a stable and flat surface to finish.

9/04/06

I’ve started to fill in the holes at this stage, and have used topsoil which I got in 30kg bags which I got from the local garden centre. In the end I used about 40 bags, and would have been much better getting it delivered in bulk at the start.

25/05/06

This was just before I laid out the new grass. I had thought about planting seed, but the ground is still very hard in areas, and I don’t think that seed would take that well.

26/05/06

This was my day of triumph after nearly a years wait. Laying the sods was hard enough work as they had been rain soaked and pretty heavy, but was nothing compared to the last years digging etc. I got them from http://www.summerhilllawns.ie

I would roughly make up my costs as the following:
Piping €150
Stones €250
Top soil €230
Grass €240
Tools €80
TOTAL = €950

I have some of the piping left for sale (free) over on the FS section if anybody is interested.
http://www.adverts.ie/showproduct.php?product=861

Feel free to ask any questions as I have been pretty brief in what I have done and have probably missed some info.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1.jpg (216.5 KB, 2780 views)
File Type: jpg 2.jpg (141.3 KB, 2714 views)
File Type: jpg 3.jpg (123.6 KB, 2708 views)
File Type: jpg 4.jpg (118.4 KB, 2713 views)
File Type: jpg 5.jpg (110.3 KB, 2726 views)

Last edited by delly; 01-05-2016 at 15:11.
delly is offline  
Advertisement
30-05-2006, 12:13   #2
The Hill Billy
Prick, with a fork
 
The Hill Billy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 19,935

Well done Delly!

It is very nice to see the outcome of your hard work.
Too often do posters ask for advice - receive responses & we never hear of the final outcome.
The Hill Billy is offline  
(2) thanks from:
30-05-2006, 12:33   #3
beolight
Registered User
 
beolight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 606
well done excellent job and very informative post

a few comments you could also have bought drainage stone for 40/50 euros a tonne delivered in tonne bag(they will charge for the bag 10 euros) ask at your local builders providers where is best place to buy bulk delivered stones, this will work out much ceaper than bags. you also get a bag to put all the rubbish and orange clay which can at a later date be lifted into a squip.

same applies to topsoil as you realised

land drainage pipes: there are actually joiner pieces that can be used if you are seeking perfection
beolight is offline  
30-05-2006, 13:54   #4
GreeBo
Registered User
 
GreeBo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 21,475
nice job.
Ive done a lot of work in my house back/garden (not as "basic" as that) and I wish I had taken photos so I could compare the "then" and "now"
when you see it everyday you forget how bad it was.

Let us know how it handles a shed load of rain i.e is it draining!
GreeBo is offline  
30-05-2006, 14:09   #5
delly
Radiator
 
delly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,833
Thanks for the kind words people, thanks also to anybody who helped me along the way.

In relation to the drainage now, before I put the grass down there was a massive rainfall a couple of weeks ago. While a lot of surface water built up during the rain, it had cleared the following day. I suppose time will tell how effective it will be when the grass takes.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 6.jpg (133.8 KB, 2896 views)
File Type: jpg 7.jpg (129.5 KB, 2765 views)
File Type: jpg 8.jpg (152.9 KB, 2747 views)
File Type: jpg 9.jpg (141.4 KB, 2747 views)
File Type: jpg 10.jpg (107.5 KB, 2838 views)

Last edited by delly; 01-05-2016 at 15:10.
delly is offline  
Advertisement
30-05-2006, 17:11   #6
AdrianR
Registered User
 
AdrianR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 266
Quote:
a few comments you could also have bought drainage stone for 40/50 euros a tonne delivered in tonne bag
Ouch! It's €12 a tonne for loose drainage stones down here, incl delivery.
AdrianR is offline  
30-05-2006, 20:14   #7
delly
Radiator
 
delly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,833
As I was doing it bit by bit, I only got stuff as I needed it, and I don't think i'd have been in the good books if I had a few tonne bags hanging around the driveway for a while .
delly is offline  
30-05-2006, 21:36   #8
tred
Registered User
 
tred's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,430

Quote:
Originally Posted by delly
As I was doing it bit by bit, I only got stuff as I needed it, and I don't think i'd have been in the good books if I had a few tonne bags hanging around the driveway for a while .


Fair play to you. Best DIY Job I have seen in a while. a lot of work went into, keep us posted on how u get on during the winter. Well done.
tred is offline  
31-05-2006, 07:21   #9
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,177
well done.... great job.
looks like a lot of work, but obviously payed off...
you will have many a long evening supping on beer admiring your work..
well done again.
\m/_(>_<)_\m/ is offline  
Advertisement
31-05-2006, 16:07   #10
JohnBoy
Registered User
 
JohnBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 2,328
just update the thread in a couple of weeks to let us know how the lawn took
JohnBoy is offline  
01-06-2006, 20:59   #11
Sparky
Subscriber
 
Sparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,292
That pipe is excellent stuff, we done a massive garden of lights and used that pipe as we didnt want them to full up with water over time.
The owners of the house said after we installed all cables, where once the back garden would be waterlogged in the middle, its now dry.
We used 100mtrs of the stuff.
Sparky is offline  
02-06-2006, 14:05   #12
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 5,014
Quote:
Originally Posted by delly
I have some of the piping left for sale over on the FS section if anybody is interested.
http://www.adverts.ie/showproduct.php?product=861
Goddamnit, I've had 40-50m of that stuff rolled up behind my shed for the last 5 years since I did the same job.

Haven't been able to give it away.
Gurgle is offline  
02-06-2006, 14:38   #13
delly
Radiator
 
delly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gurgle
Goddamnit, I've had 40-50m of that stuff rolled up behind my shed for the last 5 years since I did the same job.

Haven't been able to give it away.
Maybe your piping could do with a friend
delly is offline  
09-06-2006, 09:25   #14
delly
Radiator
 
delly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,833
Just a quick update with a picture after the first cut.
delly is offline  
Thanks from:
09-06-2006, 10:47   #15
GreeBo
Registered User
 
GreeBo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 21,475
Nice...looks like you have some nice water pressure there...lucky fecker
GreeBo is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet