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03-03-2006, 21:45   #1
cormie
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Aldi Chainsaw

Hi,
I just saw this chainsaw on the Aldi site. I don't know a lot about chainsaws but I know it would come in pretty handy for chopping up wood to turn/carve etc since I don't yet have a band saw and don't have room for one either.

I also like the 3 year warranty on it, and Aldi being Aldi, if I've any trouble with it, I'm sure they'll be no problem to deal with!

Any experienced opinions?
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03-03-2006, 21:58   #2
Apip99
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@ that price, you can't go wrong.

Not to sure about chain saws and what to look for, but I'll be looking to get one for log cutting next year.

Thanks for the heads up,

Pip
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03-03-2006, 22:33   #3
rooferPete
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Hi cormie,

Very tempting, Please take into account the fact that nobody in the hire business hires out chainsaws.

The reason has nothing to do with the person it's the chainsaw, they are a very dangerous tool in unskilled hands, maintenance and knowing how is a major factor in using them because the saw may need to be tweaked a few times every hour.

Having worked with a skilled Tree Surgeon for a few days I learned enough not to buy a chainsaw in case someone else tried to use it.

That said it looks a great buy at the price.

.
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03-03-2006, 22:40   #4
Litcagral
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rooferPete
Hi cormie,

Very tempting, Please take into account the fact that nobody in the hire business hires out chainsaws.


Sorry to contradict you rooferPete but John Phelan Light Machinery, Hanna's Avenue, Lusk, Co Dublin hires out chainsaws. I have hired one from him several times. (Can't hire a ladder from him though ).
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03-03-2006, 22:47   #5
rooferPete
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Hi Litcagral,

I don't mind the contradiction, I expect similar to the way he won't hire a ladder the majority refuse to hire chainsaws but will hire ladders.

.
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03-03-2006, 22:58   #6
cormie
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Thanks for the replies

Would it take long to learn how to use it properly? Do you reckon this is a "user friendly" one since Aldi of all places are selling it? I also see it has automatic lubrication, makes me think it's a maintenance free one? In your days with the tree surgeon, do you now have the confidence to use one or would you still be wary?
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03-03-2006, 23:03   #7
Litcagral
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cormie
Thanks for the replies

Would it take long to learn how to use it properly? Do you reckon this is a "user friendly" one since Aldi of all places are selling it? I also see it has automatic lubrication, makes me think it's a maintenance free one? In your days with the tree surgeon, do you now have the confidence to use one or would you still be wary?

Hi Cornie, Never allow the blade to touch the ground when cutting wood - it destroys the blade. If possible, cut in an elevated position.
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03-03-2006, 23:23   #8
rooferPete
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Hi cormie,

I would use one if I have to and that means no alternative method available, my short time with a man who had over thity years experience taught me that to use a chainsaw is a skill.

He would stop at no set intervals and tighten the chain etc, he could tell from the feel of the saw how long it would be before he needed to stop and carry out his five minute service.

Also he had three saws all different sizes and would switch over just looking at what I thought were the same size trees.

As much an art form as it was (in my eyes) another man with as much experience suffered horrific injuries when the chain flew off and wrapped around his face.

I would recommend that you spend a day with someone like Litcagral who obviously knows the rules and ways of safely using these saws.

.
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04-03-2006, 09:31   #9
kadman
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You would be well advised to contact Fas / Coillte who used to organise chainsaw safety courses, and may be able to point you to the nearest place to get some expert advice.

If you intend cutting up your stock for carving ect, make sure it is secure before you start cutting. Chainsaws have a habit of pulling timber all over the shop.

Check aldis one for a safety break mechanism, which cuts out the engine in certain unsafe operations, usually on the top, if memory serves me well.

If you intend ripping down along the grain of the trunk, ie planking.
You will have to resharpen the teeth of the chain, to an almost 90 degee angle, viewed from the top. I used to use 2 chains, 1 to plank, and 1 to crosscut.

There are safety gloves, and leggings available, so you might check them out.

Steel toe caps.

Safety first, everything else second.

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04-03-2006, 10:03   #10
cormie
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Seems like a big task to use a chainsaw.. is this a real bargain or could I get something similar for maybe €20 or so dearer on any given day? I'd say I'd mainly be using it for planking for bowls, as 1 crosscut will give you maybe 3/4 cuts for a bowl? Does every chainsaw need a 5 minute service every few cuts? Would this be any different? I just have the idea in my head that an Aldi one is as user friendly as you're going to get, I could be wrong though. About switching over saws for different trees, I wouldn't know the first thing about that. I don't really have the money at the moment, but if it's a definite bargain I may be tempted just to go for it, use it at a later date!
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04-03-2006, 10:29   #11
JohnBoy
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absofriggenlutely lethal machines, but damm good at what they do.

My auld lad has owned chainsaws all his life and cuts a fair share of timber and I flatly refuse to use the damm things, they scare the living daylights out of me (and as a rule i'm not one for being unreasonably scared of machines)

as a general rule chainsaws don't tend to kill people, chainsaws tend to horribly maim and scar.

they don't cut in a very traditional manner, they more tear timber (or flesh) apart.

I'll buy one some day, but i'll spend a few quid on proper safety gear and training first.


as for tips.

yeah, don't leave the saw down while its still spinning
always make sure you've got the timber solidy held and elevated from the ground
be especially careful when cutting light/smaller pieces of timber as the saw can pick them and fling them anywhere
read the manual before use (duh!!)
take the bar/chain assembly apart before you use it and rebuild it, make sure you understand how it goes together, and the impact of the particular adjustments on the chain tension.
buy a proper chain file with a guide to allow you to sharpen in the correct direction
use actual chain oil as opposed to whatever oil you happen to have lying around.
get your saw serviced once every year or two (and this is the biggest issue i'd have with the aldi saw, don't get me wrong, i own a lot of aldi/lidl kit, this isn't tool snobbery)

buy the safety gear, not gonna claim any authority on this but steels, heavy leather gloves and face protection are essential.

stihl do a nice hard hat with integrated ear muffs and face guard which is ideal. expect to spend more on safety kit than on the aldi saw.

if it all goes horribly wrong the safety kit is unfortunately only gonna limit the damage anyway, not eliminate it.

the ultimate in saw safety gear afaik is special overalls/leggings that have a layer of loose fleecy material in a sandwich. if you cut through the outer layer the saw eats the fleece jamming it dead and saving your leg. no idea where you'd buy em but coillte could possibly advise
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04-03-2006, 10:33   #12
cormie
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John Boy you threw me right off getting one

For now anyway... I don't have the money for all the protection and don't really want to try use it without everything you mentioned. They sound dangerous alright. I don't really need it just yet so I think I'll hold off until I'm ready to take some lessons and spend the proper money!

Thanks for all the feedback
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04-03-2006, 10:46   #13
Litcagral
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Another tip Cornie - if possible buy the smallest (i.e. lightest) saw that you can get away with. Using a large heavy saw will exhaust you in no time. (I'm not sure of the size of the Aldi one).
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04-03-2006, 16:22   #14
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hmmm yeah maybe i came off a bit strong there, but yeah, umm they're really dangerous

no actually i stand by what i said (even if the aldi one does seem to be exceedingly good value)
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04-03-2006, 17:08   #15
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I use chainsaws on a regular basis, and they are only dangerous if you don't have the right safety gear on and you don't use it correctly.

The main thing to be careful of when using one is never try and cut anything smaller than the width of your arm, or anything with ivy on it - reason - small branches and ivy can get caught in the chain and cause the chain to come off which you really don't want.

The other main thing to remember is never put all your weight on the chainsaw because if the branch snaps or the saw cuts through quicker than you expect you could end up on the saw, which you also really don't want. Also always make sure your standing on level ground, clear away any branches etc that may be around your feet you don't want to fall.

Great tool once used correctly.
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