Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
31-12-2005, 14:18   #1
franksm
Registered User
 
franksm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sometimes Dublin, sometimes Belfast
Posts: 1,399
Send a message via MSN to franksm
Drilling through wall to route cable

Hi folks & Happy New Year !

I'm putting together a FTA system at the moment - have the receiver, the cable, connectors, but no dish (had ordered a 90cm from Maplin but now backordered for quite a while).

Anyway, I'll probably get one locally (satellite.ie).

In the meantime, I plan on running cable from the shed, along the garden and into the house - with the plan of course to mount the dish somewhere near the shed.

Question: is it okay to drill a hole from the outside of the house all the way in, bridge it with conduit making sure it's sealed, then putting cable through that conduit ? The house is a timber-frame affair ie. concrete block on the outside, a layer of insulation, then a layer of board, then the plasterboard.

WHat sort of drillbit should be used - masonry or "auger" ? The latter looks like it'll make a big hole very quick, and remove a lot of waste on the way.

If that's not a good idea, how does one route a cable from outside to inside ? I have never seen how the pro's do it for CCTV, alarms, dishes, lights, etc etc.

Thanks

Frank
franksm is offline  
Advertisement
31-12-2005, 16:35   #2
Tony
Business owner
 
Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Satellite.ie
Posts: 10,208
I usually drill from the inside out and feed the cable through, if its a cavity wall you may need a coathanger to help guide it through. Make sure ou leave a "drip loop" on the outside so rain drops off before getting near the hole andseal with silicone.
Tony is offline  
31-12-2005, 16:42   #3
lawhec
Closed Account
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 1,743
Also drill (from the inside to the out) at a slightly downward angle - if the sealing then for some reason breaks at least rainwater would have to dry and go uphill to enter the inside.
lawhec is offline  
31-12-2005, 17:19   #4
Tony
Business owner
 
Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Satellite.ie
Posts: 10,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Correspondent
Also drill (from the inside to the out) at a slightly downward angle - if the sealing then for some reason breaks at least rainwater would have to dry and go uphill to enter the inside.
This makes it tough the get the cable through on a cavity wall though
Tony is offline  
31-12-2005, 17:21   #5
franksm
Registered User
 
franksm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sometimes Dublin, sometimes Belfast
Posts: 1,399
Send a message via MSN to franksm
Thanks for the tips: inside-->out, not the other way around.
franksm is offline  
Advertisement
31-12-2005, 17:34   #6
Tony
Business owner
 
Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Satellite.ie
Posts: 10,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksm
Thanks for the tips: inside-->out, not the other way around.
No problem, one of the reasons for this is safety so you can get an idea where sockets etc are, its also usually better to have the rough finish on the pustide where you can patch and paint later. If you are lucky you can drill the gap between two blocks.
Tony is offline  
31-12-2005, 17:56   #7
optiplexgx270
Registered User
 
optiplexgx270's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Dublin
Posts: 2,146
Send a message via ICQ to optiplexgx270 Send a message via AIM to optiplexgx270 Send a message via MSN to optiplexgx270 Send a message via Yahoo to optiplexgx270
IBB didnt to the drip loop or even seal the hole in my room but then again i dont see a drip loop working with high end cat5 cable. But they did drill from inside out leaving a nice pile of dust on the bed.
optiplexgx270 is offline  
01-01-2006, 02:57   #8
John R
Registered User
 
John R's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 4,091
I don't know how common it is but I have always put cables through the window frames. It is only possible with some windows though, you have to be careful not to go through the seal on double-glazing.

In my house this was due to necessity. The walls are very thick and made out of some very strange bricks, they are infused with lumps of a granite-like rock that just will not give. The original sky installer insisted on drilling through the walls, 45mns and 2 drill bits later he had only gotten 1/2 way through.
John R is offline  
01-01-2006, 03:55   #9
Tenshot
Registered User
 
Tenshot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 483
If you're drilling through solid concrete, having the right equipment (in this case, a proper SDS hammer-action drill rather than a cheap household drill) makes all the difference. Worth renting one for the afternoon from your local DIY shop if your standard drill doesn't seem up to it. I'd definitely use a masonry bit rather than an auger.

If you're routing high-quality CAT5 (I know you aren't, but somone else mentioned it), you can still make a drip loop - just make sure you don't put a sharp bend in it.

If you're having trouble fishing the cable through, a coat hanger is easiest, but if you don't have one handy, using the original drill bit works well too if it's a decent length.

(BTW, for those interested in such things, CPC in the UK are selling a three-piece set of 1 metre SDS bits (12mm, 16mm, 24mm) for £10 at the moment - details here. I bought a set a couple of months ago, and while I've only had to drill two holes so far, I've got great use out of the 12mm bit as an aid to fishing cables through walls and between floors.)
Tenshot is offline  
Advertisement
01-01-2006, 12:12   #10
tapest
Registered User
 
tapest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksm
Hi folks & Happy New Year !

I'm putting together a FTA system at the moment - have the receiver, the cable, connectors, but no dish (had ordered a 90cm from Maplin but now backordered for quite a while).

Anyway, I'll probably get one locally (satellite.ie).

In the meantime, I plan on running cable from the shed, along the garden and into the house - with the plan of course to mount the dish somewhere near the shed.

Question: is it okay to drill a hole from the outside of the house all the way in, bridge it with conduit making sure it's sealed, then putting cable through that conduit ? The house is a timber-frame affair ie. concrete block on the outside, a layer of insulation, then a layer of board, then the plasterboard.

WHat sort of drillbit should be used - masonry or "auger" ? The latter looks like it'll make a big hole very quick, and remove a lot of waste on the way.

If that's not a good idea, how does one route a cable from outside to inside ? I have never seen how the pro's do it for CCTV, alarms, dishes, lights, etc etc.

Thanks

Frank
Frank
Recently had the "pleasure" of installing yard tap for sister in law (anything to keep wifey happy). My first timber frame house, so I was petrified of water ingress and breaking any thermal / insulation barrier,etc.with copper pipe. I played safe. Drilled from inside out with very long narrow drill bit and then widened hole to accomodate a 3/4" plastic electrical pipe as sleeve. Using plastic pipe as sleeve prevented bridging thermal gap. Widened hole outside seperately for neat finish (no risk of bursting out and damaging area around hole). Cut plastic pipe an inch longer than the required length so that if water penetrated seal between copper and inside of plastic pipe it would drip into the room where you would see it and not get nasty suprise a year later. As plastic pipe was a tight fit in wall, lashed on plenty of silicon sealant and tapped pipe home into final position.
Suggest you do something similar for cable, finally sealing (outside only) with expanding foam inside plastic pipe. Running additional cables later is a doddle if you use 3/4" or 1" pipe. Drip loop of course on outside. No trouble fishing cable now or later...all contained in plastic.

Sorry about long winded...but worth doing right and only once

Regards t
tapest is offline  
01-01-2006, 14:50   #11
muffler
Moderator
 
muffler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Land of the brave.
Posts: 29,780
What would be wrong with taking the cable through the soffit, into the attic and then feed to rooms below.
muffler is offline  
01-01-2006, 15:58   #12
Tony
Business owner
 
Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Satellite.ie
Posts: 10,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffler
What would be wrong with taking the cable through the soffit, into the attic and then feed to rooms below.
rooms? cable can only go to one room
Tony is offline  
01-01-2006, 16:23   #13
muffler
Moderator
 
muffler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Land of the brave.
Posts: 29,780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony
rooms? cable can only go to one room
Amazing what one "s" can do to a sentence

ROOM it shall be then but what about an answer to my query
muffler is offline  
01-01-2006, 16:31   #14
Tony
Business owner
 
Tony's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Satellite.ie
Posts: 10,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffler
Amazing what one "s" can do to a sentence

ROOM it shall be then but what about an answer to my query
No reason why not, i guess it depends on the ease of install but generally most people dont go for this option as its more installer time and more expensive but for a diyer is definitely an option. Another issue is insurance which generally does not allow an installer to be covered for attic entry.
Tony is offline  
01-01-2006, 17:08   #15
muffler
Moderator
 
muffler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Land of the brave.
Posts: 29,780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony
No reason why not, i guess it depends on the ease of install but generally most people dont go for this option as its more installer time and more expensive but for a diyer is definitely an option. Another issue is insurance which generally does not allow an installer to be covered for attic entry.
The reason I mentioned this initially was that I thought it would be handier, cheaper and quicker to drill through a wooden soffit and if necessary down through the plasterboard ceiling.

In my house there is conduit from the attic down to the resess at the side of the chimney breast in the sitting room. I know a lot of houses would not have this though.

Regarding the insurance Tony I am only assuming that it would cover you for putting up aerials on a chimney so I would also assume that it would cover entry to the attic. The attic would be a safer place to be than the rooftop
muffler is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet