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01-08-2019, 00:22   #1
Slydice
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Homelessness numbers and their impact.

Alright, a new thread to focus on the Homelessness Numbers and looking at their impact.
The previous threads (one, two) with the previous reports charts are locked.

These first summary charts show the trends for numbers of Adults and numbers of Familys (Adults and Children).
They are updated with the numbers for the latest month:


In the previous threads last report I had just noticed:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slydice View Post
It looks like the same numbers but the number of years are different:
  • in 3 and a bit years: Adults with Children went from around 3000 to over 6000
  • in 4 and a bit years: just Adults went from around 3000 to over 6000

This reminded me of the start of the October 2018 post:
https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/show...5&postcount=11
Quote:
"In Europe, the rate is much lower where women typically account for between 20% and 33% of the homeless population"
"research found that 66% of homeless families in Ireland are headed by lone parents, most of whom are women"

The Latest Report
The Homelessness Report June 2019 has been released:
https://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/def..._june_2019.pdf

This is the second time I can remember all the headline numbers dropping month-on-month. The first time was last month.
I've updated the two charts based on the totals they give.

Homelessness (Adults)


Family Homelessness



Recent Media relating to Homelessness
The irishexaminer.com carried this headline which indicates "in relation to excessive absenteeism by children from school":
Number of pupils missing school soar
https://www.irishexaminer.com/breaki...rs-936665.html
Quote:
School absenteeism cases on Tusla’s national waiting list have surged to the highest recorded level due to the rising number of homeless children, insufficient numbers of staff, and increasingly complex cases such as students with mental health issues and special needs.

Figures contained in the child and family agency’s most recently published monthly report show that in April, Tusla’s Educational Welfare Service (EWS) had 2,636 referrals on its waiting list. The figure has been climbing steadily since last October and the comparable figure from April 2018 was 1,670 cases.
Just two data points but I've put this on a chart too:


This reminds me of the report mentioned previously from Goldsmiths, University of London about Childrens development in Dublin "while living in temporary hotel accommodation"
Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham View Post
Using hotels for homeless families has ‘destructive impact’ on children
Children in emergency accommodation not developing properly, says report
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/soci...dren-1.3921069
More about the Report: ‘Temporary’ hotels have devastating effects on homeless families
https://www.gold.ac.uk/news/homeless...-hotel-impact/

Supply of homes
The solution has always been "to increase the supply of homes". The latest report does not have commentary where previous reports did. They used to include:
Quote:
The long term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes
or:
Quote:
The root cause of increased homelessness is the supply shortage across the housing sector, which in turn is a result of the recent economic collapse and the associated damage to the construction sector. Accordingly the long-term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes.
Attached Images
File Type: png June2019Summary.png (13.0 KB, 1255 views)
File Type: png June2019H.png (13.6 KB, 1253 views)
File Type: png June2019FH.png (19.2 KB, 1258 views)
File Type: png TuslaEWS.png (6.6 KB, 1253 views)
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02-09-2019, 21:14   #2
Slydice
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First an update of the summary charts showing the trends for numbers of Adults and numbers of Familys (Adults and Children).
They are updated with the numbers for the latest month:



The Latest Report
The Homelessness Report July 2019 has been released:
https://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/def..._july_2019.pdf

The last two reports had the first headline numbers dropping month-on-month I could remember. This figures in this report have homelessness numbers on the rise again.

I've updated the two charts based on the totals they give.

Homelessness (Adults)


Family Homelessness


I had kind of held out a bit of hope there from the last two reports


Quarterly report
I'm not sure how things are going but they released a quarterly report alongside this report:
https://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/def..._june_2019.pdf
It feels a bit unfinished with the blank section on "Homelessnessand Housing Inclusion Supports". I'm guessing the authors were under time pressure and ran out of time.

It has these two points:
Quote:
Note that exits include both exits from emergency accommodation and persons who have been assessed as homeless but have not entered emergency accommodation e.g. HAP preventions through homeless HAP.
Quote:
To date in 2019, 51% of families presenting to homeless services in the Dublin region were prevented from having to enter emergency accommodation.
That sounds like they are experiencing larger numbers than are being seen coming through to the reports.


Supply of homes
The solution has always been "to increase the supply of homes". The latest report does not have commentary where previous reports did. They used to include:
Quote:
The long term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes
or:
Quote:
The root cause of increased homelessness is the supply shortage across the housing sector, which in turn is a result of the recent economic collapse and the associated damage to the construction sector. Accordingly the long-term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes.
From the quarterly report, it has numbers on where "exits" are going. It doesn't look like all that much of it is permanent accomodation:

It looks like a like is going to the rental sector.
Attached Images
File Type: png July2019Summary.png (13.0 KB, 1 views)
File Type: png July2019H.png (14.0 KB, 1185 views)
File Type: png July2019FH.png (20.2 KB, 1187 views)
File Type: png July2019ExitsQ1-2.png (26.1 KB, 1185 views)
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03-09-2019, 07:08   #3
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https://www.focusireland.ie/non-iris...ssness-dublin/

Non-nationals make up 31% of the "homeless" but the bigger picture is that out immigration numbers are still at unsustainable levels including those that are coming here for work. With the number of new arrivals to Ireland each year, the supply of homes just can't compete. The attitude that MNCs getting hurt in an international recession being good for the housing market doesn't get said too often but it really is the only thing it seems that can help the situation.
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03-09-2019, 07:20   #4
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I can see where you are coming from but skilled immigrants are still needed in some industries.

I would be familiar with the software development industry and sometimes it really is difficult to find local people with the right skillset. Often companies would prefer locals as they are seen as more likely to stay long term.

In terms of costs, it can be more expensive to hire immigrants as you may end up paying relocation fees e.g. visa costs for non EU people.

I haven't seen a situation yet where an immigrant was hired over a local as they were willing to take a lower salary. I'm sure it happens, I just haven't seen it myself.
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03-09-2019, 08:49   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super_Sonic View Post
I can see where you are coming from but skilled immigrants are still needed in some industries.

I would be familiar with the software development industry and sometimes it really is difficult to find local people with the right skillset. Often companies would prefer locals as they are seen as more likely to stay long term.

In terms of costs, it can be more expensive to hire immigrants as you may end up paying relocation fees e.g. visa costs for non EU people.

I haven't seen a situation yet where an immigrant was hired over a local as they were willing to take a lower salary. I'm sure it happens, I just haven't seen it myself.
Yeah, but it's not about Irish versus non-Irish, it's about those that are already here and trying to house them let alone the new people arriving each week to take up new jobs. The supply isn't satisfying the demand for those already here so the problem is not going to go away anytime soon unless dramatic changes happen.
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03-09-2019, 10:39   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super_Sonic View Post
I can see where you are coming from but skilled immigrants are still needed in some industries.

I would be familiar with the software development industry and sometimes it really is difficult to find local people with the right skillset. Often companies would prefer locals as they are seen as more likely to stay long term.

In terms of costs, it can be more expensive to hire immigrants as you may end up paying relocation fees e.g. visa costs for non EU people.

I haven't seen a situation yet where an immigrant was hired over a local as they were willing to take a lower salary. I'm sure it happens, I just haven't seen it myself.

+1
I recently moved department in work (large mnc) to an analytics function.
My team is made up of two non EU/EEA individuals where the company sponsored their visas and paid relocation, and 3 Irish folks that were previously working in the industry but in different companies


I was involved in the team as the first entrant and saw first hand the difficulties in attracting local applicants that met the criteria. I imagine most skilled jobs are the same.

Last edited by ELM327; 03-09-2019 at 12:01.
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03-09-2019, 11:54   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Assetbacked View Post
https://www.focusireland.ie/non-iris...ssness-dublin/

Non-nationals make up 31% of the "homeless" but the bigger picture is that out immigration numbers are still at unsustainable levels including those that are coming here for work. With the number of new arrivals to Ireland each year, the supply of homes just can't compete. The attitude that MNCs getting hurt in an international recession being good for the housing market doesn't get said too often but it really is the only thing it seems that can help the situation.
The people coming here to work for MNCs are not the people who are homeless nor are they even renting the same types of place that those who are homeless would be even attempting to.
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03-09-2019, 12:41   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nox001 View Post
The people coming here to work for MNCs are not the people who are homeless nor are they even renting the same types of place that those who are homeless would be even attempting to.
Thank you captain obvious.

Are you adding clarity to what I said or what is the point of your post?
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03-09-2019, 13:21   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nox001 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Assetbacked View Post
https://www.focusireland.ie/non-iris...ssness-dublin/

Non-nationals make up 31% of the "homeless" but the bigger picture is that out immigration numbers are still at unsustainable levels including those that are coming here for work. With the number of new arrivals to Ireland each year, the supply of homes just can't compete. The attitude that MNCs getting hurt in an international recession being good for the housing market doesn't get said too often but it really is the only thing it seems that can help the situation.
The people coming here to work for MNCs are not the people who are homeless nor are they even renting the same types of place that those who are homeless would be even attempting to.
But they are still part of the demand Vs supply equation.

If they weren't here more accommodation would be available if amount of property to rent stayed.

The homeless might not literally stay in same units but people in other properties might move into where the MNC staff currently live. So property gets freed up all over.

Stopping them coming isn't the answer though .
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30-09-2019, 22:15   #10
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First an update of the summary charts showing the trends for numbers of Adults and numbers of Familys (Adults and Children).
They are updated with the numbers for the latest month:



The Latest Report
The Homelessness Report August 2019 has been released:
https://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/def...ugust_2019.pdf

Two reports now with a month-on-month rise.
I've updated the two charts based on the totals they give.

Homelessness (Adults)


Family Homelessness



EU - European Social Policy Network (ESPN) Report for Ireland (2019)
The ESPN Thematic Report on National strategies to fight homelessness and housing exclusion - Ireland (2019) has also been released:
https://ec.europa.eu/social/BlobServ...1604&langId=en

This jumped out for me:
Quote:
At present there is statistical obfuscation if not ‘corruption’.
Apart from that, the summary included points that caught my eye:
  • Homelessness as a problem is generally well recognised in Ireland
  • Housing vulnerability is much less recognised, which among other things means that prevention is not prominent in the Irish approach
  • Homelessness has long been a problem in Ireland but the numbers keep growing
  • There is a particular cast to this though in that public building is gradually being replaced by acquisition from the private sector and private accommodation is coming to replace (rather than complement) public housing in the response to homelessness and housing exclusion (HHE) and other housing-related problems.
  • exits from homelessness and HHE are fewer than the numbers entering
  • over-reliance on private-sector housing which has little security for tenants; almost complete dependence on (an under-resourced) voluntary sector for service provision;
  • Prevention is another key weakness. To rectify this means enhancing homeless and general housing support services and much stronger rent control measures as well as regulation of the private-rented housing sector with a particular focus on tenant protection and rights. The low stock and insufficient supply of social housing (currently at 8% of total stock) is another issue of concern and arguably the fundamental issue.

They use very rounded numbers but they give a perspective:



Media
Looks like the cost of rent is bringing soldiers into Homelessness danger now:
'I either have to leave the Defence Forces or stay and be homeless with my pregnant wife'
https://www.thejournal.ie/defence-fo...22862-Sep2019/
Quote:
One officer said he returned from a UN mission in 2017 and was, at the time, renting a one-bed apartment with his wife in Dublin for €1,600. He said their landlord told them their lease was up and the rent was going up to €2,400.

He said he told his superior: “I will either have to leave the Defence Forces or stay and be homeless with my wife, who is expecting a child. That was the stark reality facing me when I returned from overseas service.”
This is a very concerning article on exploitation of people facing homelessness.
Minister taking reports of rental sector sexual exploitation 'very seriously'
https://www.rte.ie/news/politics/201...oitation-dail/
Quote:
She said she had been looking for a property for ten months and had been facing homelessness.
Quote:
testimonies from women outlined landlord behaviour including commenting on women's appearances, making inappropriate sexual comments, warning tenants not to have boyfriends and sending drunken text messages.

Supply of homes
The solution has always been "to increase the supply of homes". The latest report does not have commentary where previous reports did. They used to include:
Quote:
The long term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes
or:
Quote:
The root cause of increased homelessness is the supply shortage across the housing sector, which in turn is a result of the recent economic collapse and the associated damage to the construction sector. Accordingly the long-term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes.
Attached Images
File Type: png Aug2019Summary.png (13.2 KB, 775 views)
File Type: png Aug2019H.png (14.0 KB, 775 views)
File Type: png Aug2019FH.png (22.8 KB, 777 views)
File Type: png Aug2019ESPN.png (7.1 KB, 768 views)
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31-10-2019, 21:42   #11
Slydice
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First an update of the summary charts showing the trends for numbers of Adults and numbers of Familys (Adults and Children).
They are updated with the numbers for the latest month:



The Latest Report
The Homelessness Report August 2019 has been released:
https://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/def...mber_20191.pdf

Two reports now with a month-on-month rise. The total is now the highest I've seen at 10,397

I've updated the two charts based on the numbers in the report.

Homelessness (Adults)


Family Homelessness



Visual analysis of Dublin
I hadn't gotten the idea that D1, D7 and D8 provide for so many until I saw this info visual:
https://twitter.com/RobCross247/stat...47323868364801
Quote:
Rob Cross
Aug 11

Yes, over time I've populated the map myself referencing data from various sources such as InsideAirbnb, the vacant site register, news articles, Universities papers, NAMA reports, EPA, Dublin planning applications, An Bord Pleanala etc. and last but not least, site inspections.

Media
Felt like a heavy impact this month.

‘Sam’
https://www.broadsheet.ie/2019/10/16/sam/
Quote:
‘Sam’, aged five, eating as he knelt on a piece of cardboard on Grafton Street last night


Homeless man, 30s, dies after being found unconscious in Dublin city centre
https://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/...re-958457.html
Quote:
Mr Flynn added: "This can’t become normal or acceptable. The Minister must activate the cold winter initiative immediately and insure beds are available for all who want to access."
McVerry: Government’s homeless plan not working
https://www.irishexaminer.com/breaki...ng-958827.html
Quote:
It is more than three years since they introduced Rebuilding Ireland — their strategy to reduce homelessness — and virtually every single month for the last three years the number of homeless people has gone up. At what point do you say our strategy is not working? We have got to revisit it. The emperor has no clothes.
'Homeless children struggle to chew food'
https://www.independent.ie/irish-new...-38609982.html
Quote:
"Mums and dads haven't been able to prepare proper food when they're living in hotels, so the children are still on puréed food in pouches, at two and three years of age, because it doesn't perish the same way fresh food does."

Other "basic developmental milestones are being missed" in children who have been living for long periods in emergency accommodation. Due to a lack of space, "children are finding it difficult to learn to crawl and learn to walk".


Supply of homes
The solution has always been "to increase the supply of homes". The latest report does not have commentary where previous reports did. They used to include:
Quote:
The long term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes
or:
Quote:
The root cause of increased homelessness is the supply shortage across the housing sector, which in turn is a result of the recent economic collapse and the associated damage to the construction sector. Accordingly the long-term solution to the current homeless issue is to increase the supply of homes.
Attached Images
File Type: png Sep2019Summary.png (13.7 KB, 625 views)
File Type: png Sept2019H.png (14.4 KB, 625 views)
File Type: png Sept2019FH.png (24.3 KB, 627 views)
File Type: jpg sam.jpg (45.3 KB, 630 views)
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01-11-2019, 11:43   #12
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Was there any reason for that child to be eating on the floor on Grafton St? Looks like a stunt tbh.
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01-11-2019, 13:13   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Interested Observer View Post
Was there any reason for that child to be eating on the floor on Grafton St? Looks like a stunt tbh.
Where should he have eaten then? It was a soup kitchen, they don't provide you a table and chairs.
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01-11-2019, 13:17   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slydice View Post
Homeless man, 30s, dies after being found unconscious in Dublin city centre
https://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/...re-958457.html
I think people choosing to sleep rough in order to continue consuming narcotics (versus a controlled hostel environment) is a very different issue, and I'm not sure that that any country on earth has managed to solve this.

Seems inappropriate to group this with the likes of the 5 year old kid on Grafton Street, completely different cause and circumstance.
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01-11-2019, 13:23   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lux23 View Post
Where should he have eaten then? It was a soup kitchen, they don't provide you a table and chairs.
There were other photos shown of him sitting on an upturned crate and one of him queuing up. Definitely set up for the greatest results.
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