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25-11-2019, 07:15   #91
listermint
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Originally Posted by blergh View Post
Spray foam never finishes off-gassing. So if you have an attic full of it then it is continuously emitting formaldehyde. formaldehyde is a little denser than air so it falls down into your house.
But it's not used in most spray foams these days.. did his come from Facebook ?
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25-11-2019, 07:46   #92
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But it's not used in most spray foams these days.. did his come from Facebook ?
Don't remember; wouldnt have been Facebook. Pretty sure it was about SPF and not UFFI. It might or might not have said formaldehyde specifically, but VOCs. I might have inferred formaldehyde from that.
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25-11-2019, 07:54   #93
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But it's not used in most spray foams these days.. did his come from Facebook ?
Maybe not formaldehyde but there are concerns although beijg studied further on other VOCs from spray-applied polyurethane foam, which would be what some foams are.

https://passivehouseplus.ie/blogs/new-research-raises-spray-foam-health-questions
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28-11-2019, 15:46   #94
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Originally Posted by Alf Veedersane View Post
Maybe not formaldehyde but there are concerns although beijg studied further on other VOCs from spray-applied polyurethane foam, which would be what some foams are.

https://passivehouseplus.ie/blogs/ne...alth-questions
Arent their VOC's (in abundance) in the paint you put on all your bedroom walls / living rooms / kitchens.


I dont see anyone here not painting their walls. Whats the difference between Low VOC and what sprat foam may give off ?

Still sounds like Facebook stuff. is their concrete studies on this
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28-11-2019, 17:16   #95
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Originally Posted by listermint View Post
Arent their VOC's (in abundance) in the paint you put on all your bedroom walls / living rooms / kitchens.


I dont see anyone here not painting their walls. Whats the difference between Low VOC and what sprat foam may give off ?

Still sounds like Facebook stuff. is their concrete studies on this
The studies are referenced in the link.

The type of impact on health and the extent it impacts on health depend on a number of factors, including level of exposure and length of time exposed.

But yes, there are VOCs in a whole host of materials used in the home. But again, there are degrees of potential impact depending on the persistence and level of VOCs.
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28-11-2019, 17:48   #96
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Originally Posted by listermint View Post
Arent their VOC's (in abundance) in the paint you put on all your bedroom walls / living rooms / kitchens.


I dont see anyone here not painting their walls. Whats the difference between Low VOC and what sprat foam may give off ?

Still sounds like Facebook stuff. is their concrete studies on this
There's not a whole lot of VOCs in water based paint usually. There can be very high levels in gloss paint. It's usually a bad idea to use lots of gloss paint indoors and the can will usually warm you about this.

There are VOCs in furniture especially in fibreboard. It is in the glue mainly. Mattresses are another major culprit.

There was a John Oliver segment this year looking at a potential link between fire retardants in baby mattresses and SIDS.

Hexavalent chrome is a bigger deal again. That is in most tile cement and also in gloss paint.
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28-11-2019, 22:43   #97
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Originally Posted by CosmicFool View Post
God the apartments in Ireland are ****. There has to be a better way to heat an apartment than ****ty expensive storage heaters.
Had a look in the attic of out apartment and the insulation is non existent. How did they get a way with it.
Storage heaters are rubbish in my opinion, they are great for offices but are warmest when they are not needed and most heat has gone by 9pm! I find the best way is to wear plenty of layers and warm clothes particularly in older apartments!
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03-12-2019, 22:10   #98
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Signing a lease in the summer gave you no chance to know what problems with insulation you will experience in the winter. Therefore it's a good case to terminate your lease with no penalty whatsoever.

1. Free FLAC solicitor (by appointments only) will be able to advise on particular steps.
2. Keep a record of your correspondence with the landlord.
3. If you already contacted the management company - keep a record of it too.
4. Give the LL and the mgt. company only 3 days to respond and request them to visit the house/apt. It's winter - you can't suffer just because they take the time to reply and purposely delay you. Remember that the issue is a cost for them so they will do everything to delay the resolution. They will act quicker if they realise that you mean business.
5. Contact RTB and Threshold and tell them about the issue. They will have a log of your call/email and will advise on the procedures.
6. Finally, if approved by RTB, give your landlord a 2-week notice for refusing to act on emergency and let him know that you are in touch and guided by RTB.
7. Log an official dispute with RTB re: "Breach of Landlord obligations" and "Deposit retention", if applicable.
8. Keep a copy of all the bills re: extra heating and add to the RTB dispute. Electric Ireland (on request) will provide you with their estimation per year/month while you will show how much in fact you paid. If it's a significant difference, it will be taken into consideration for a cost return. If you log an official dispute while still living there, go ahead and use all the heating equipment you can/have - you have a strong case to guarantee the return of the cost as long as you can show a history of the problem, reports to LL and the lack of action.


Good Luck!
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03-12-2019, 23:07   #99
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Originally Posted by Curious1002 View Post
Signing a lease in the summer gave you no chance to know what problems with insulation you will experience in the winter. Therefore it's a good case to terminate your lease with no penalty whatsoever.

1. Free FLAC solicitor (by appointments only) will be able to advise on particular steps.
2. Keep a record of your correspondence with the landlord.
3. If you already contacted the management company - keep a record of it too.
4. Give the LL and the mgt. company only 3 days to respond and request them to visit the house/apt. It's winter - you can't suffer just because they take the time to reply and purposely delay you. Remember that the issue is a cost for them so they will do everything to delay the resolution. They will act quicker if they realise that you mean business.
5. Contact RTB and Threshold and tell them about the issue. They will have a log of your call/email and will advise on the procedures.
6. Finally, if approved by RTB, give your landlord a 2-week notice for refusing to act on emergency and let him know that you are in touch and guided by RTB.
7. Log an official dispute with RTB re: "Breach of Landlord obligations" and "Deposit retention", if applicable.
8. Keep a copy of all the bills re: extra heating and add to the RTB dispute. Electric Ireland (on request) will provide you with their estimation per year/month while you will show how much in fact you paid. If it's a significant difference, it will be taken into consideration for a cost return. If you log an official dispute while still living there, go ahead and use all the heating equipment you can/have - you have a strong case to guarantee the return of the cost as long as you can show a history of the problem, reports to LL and the lack of action.


Good Luck!
I’m sorry, but this post is not real life.
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04-12-2019, 09:35   #100
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Any input is valid.
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04-12-2019, 09:38   #101
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Any input is valid.
Of course, but the input has to have some relevance. What you posted is not what will happen in real life.
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04-12-2019, 09:39   #102
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious1002 View Post
Signing a lease in the summer gave you no chance to know what problems with insulation you will experience in the winter. Therefore it's a good case to terminate your lease with no penalty whatsoever.

1. Free FLAC solicitor (by appointments only) will be able to advise on particular steps.
2. Keep a record of your correspondence with the landlord.
3. If you already contacted the management company - keep a record of it too.
4. Give the LL and the mgt. company only 3 days to respond and request them to visit the house/apt. It's winter - you can't suffer just because they take the time to reply and purposely delay you. Remember that the issue is a cost for them so they will do everything to delay the resolution. They will act quicker if they realise that you mean business.
5. Contact RTB and Threshold and tell them about the issue. They will have a log of your call/email and will advise on the procedures.
6. Finally, if approved by RTB, give your landlord a 2-week notice for refusing to act on emergency and let him know that you are in touch and guided by RTB.
7. Log an official dispute with RTB re: "Breach of Landlord obligations" and "Deposit retention", if applicable.
8. Keep a copy of all the bills re: extra heating and add to the RTB dispute. Electric Ireland (on request) will provide you with their estimation per year/month while you will show how much in fact you paid. If it's a significant difference, it will be taken into consideration for a cost return. If you log an official dispute while still living there, go ahead and use all the heating equipment you can/have - you have a strong case to guarantee the return of the cost as long as you can show a history of the problem, reports to LL and the lack of action.


Good Luck!
I find your answer very helpful. I wish there were more people like you.
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04-12-2019, 09:46   #103
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I find your answer very helpful. I wish there were more people like you.
People who tell you what you want to hear, irrespective to whether there is any basis in reality for what they've said.

Sounds productive.
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04-12-2019, 09:58   #104
 
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Originally Posted by SozBbz View Post
People who tell you what you want to hear, irrespective to whether there is any basis in reality for what they've said.

Sounds productive.
But Curious102 suggested to get advice from Flac solicitors, PRTB and Threshold and only then to act on it. That's a good direction to look at. For those who are new to the problem as some people are this is a very useful advice to receive.

Do you think the tenant should just sit and do nothing until his lease expires in the summer so the landlord could get another unsuspecting tenant next year who will experience the same? This way the problem wouldnt be resolved for years yet the landlord would benefit from doing nothing and having a brand new tenant signing up the lease the time when nobody can detect the problem.
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04-12-2019, 10:11   #105
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But Curious102 suggested to get advice from Flac solicitors, PRTB and Threshold and only then to act on it. That's a good direction to look at. For those who are new to the problem as some people are this is a very useful advice to receive.

Do you think the tenant should just sit and do nothing until his lease expires in the summer so the landlord could get another unsuspected tenant next year who will experience the same? This way the problem wouldnt be resolved for years yet the landlord would benefit on doing nothing and having a brand new tenant signing up the lease the time when nobody can detect the problem.
Its raising hopes that any of that would actually be useful.

The tenant knew the apartment was cheap and the BER would have been advertised when the apartment was listed. The OP did not answer about the BER despite being asked in the thread numerous times.

Whats actually more helpful is that the OP has actually talked to his LL first before going around taking all sorts of advice from already over subscribed services.

The best advise is always to try to talk to your LL. If that fails, then look again but its just common sense.
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