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29-04-2020, 11:13   #1
colm947
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Study in the Uk then register with the teaching council in Ireland

Hi Everyone,

I am an engineer who would like to become a secondary school teacher
The Irish PME system doesn't look too appealing (cost and time)
I am considering doing a course in the UK and then moving back to Ireland

Initially I was looking at the PGDE [Professional Graduate Diploma in Education] in Scotland but it only seems to give 60 Credits so this may be a problem when trying to register
There is a PGDE [Postgraduate Diploma in Education] in England that gives 120 Credits which is more inline with the TC system

Does anyone have any experience in training abroad (open to other countries) and then returning back to teach in Ireland and registering with the TC?

In addition to those who have done this, did you then get three years to complete any shortfalls you might have had? (I need extra credits for maths)

Thanks for reading
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29-04-2020, 13:35   #2
funkypumpkins
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Originally Posted by colm947 View Post
Hi Everyone,

I am an engineer who would like to become a secondary school teacher
The Irish PME system doesn't look too appealing (cost and time)
I am considering doing a course in the UK and then moving back to Ireland

Initially I was looking at the PGDE [Professional Graduate Diploma in Education] in Scotland but it only seems to give 60 Credits so this may be a problem when trying to register
There is a PGDE [Postgraduate Diploma in Education] in England that gives 120 Credits which is more inline with the TC system

Does anyone have any experience in training abroad (open to other countries) and then returning back to teach in Ireland and registering with the TC?

In addition to those who have done this, did you then get three years to complete any shortfalls you might have had? (I need extra credits for maths)

Thanks for reading
Hi there. I trained in the UK, more specifically in England. You can get a bursary up to £27,000 now, I think. I got £25k. (Google train to teach England and they explain the bursary). It's paid to you when you are doing a course. After paying £9k for the PGCE course, you have got about £10k plus to pay with.

But you need to bear in mind that in England, the NQT year is moving to two years as there is a very high turnover of teachers in England and there are responding to this. I can't say much positive about it except I did learn good teaching techniques, but the constant scrutiny, harsh politics, responsibility for kids achieving target grades (without them taking responsibility- you 'get' them that grade) and unnecessary workload is just off putting and soul destroying.

So for you, it would be a three year commitment to train/ finish your NQT before Ireland will consider registering you.

If at all possible, I would explore training in Ireland if at all possible if working here is your goal. I am a few months of completing my NQT induction and Teaching Council won't even provisionally register me, even though I am 2/3 finished and home because of covid. I even asked if I could do an adaptation NQT period to finish here, as per their regulations. But, no way. I have conditional registration for another sector but it's not enough for schools to hire me for the upcoming year.

I have heard Scotland is different to England and some have completed their NQT even in Ireland but still the Teaching Council are very rigid and ignorant towards foreign qualifications. I was even advised to redo my PME in Ireland, even though I did the PGDE plus Masters in Educationin the UK. So choose carefully.

Last edited by funkypumpkins; 29-04-2020 at 13:38.
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29-04-2020, 17:33   #3
colm947
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Thanks for your reply
I am disappointed to hear they are increasing the induction period to two years. Do you know when this coming into effect? From what I can see it is from September 2021, which would be the year I would start my induction year so possibly it may not apply as I would have already started the process/course. (Or is that wishful thinking)
For the moment Ireland is expensive so I really am trying to find another way to qualify
Do you know if the induction period will stay at one year in Scotland?

Do you or anyone else have experience when applying with the teaching council after studying abroad and not having a lack of credits from your initial degree to teach your desired subject?
In this situation do you become registered and have two/three years to obtain these credits?
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29-04-2020, 20:34   #4
funkypumpkins
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Originally Posted by colm947 View Post
Thanks for your reply
I am disappointed to hear they are increasing the induction period to two years. Do you know when this coming into effect? From what I can see it is from September 2021, which would be the year I would start my induction year so possibly it may not apply as I would have already started the process/course. (Or is that wishful thinking)
For the moment Ireland is expensive so I really am trying to find another way to qualify
Do you know if the induction period will stay at one year in Scotland?

Do you or anyone else have experience when applying with the teaching council after studying abroad and not having a lack of credits from your initial degree to teach your desired subject?
In this situation do you become registered and have two/three years to obtain these credits?
I appreciate it is a lot cheaper. I was in the same situation where I couldn't afford to train in Ireland.

The induction period is just for England from 2020. Scotland manages its teaching council differently. So as far as I know, Scotland is staying as one year PGDE and one year NQT. I have even heard of Scottish PGDEs even doing their NQT there on the voice for teachers page on Facebook. But I question if they got their PGDE before 2015 as you were allowed to do the induction in Ireland.

As I mentioned, I am short a month of having my induction period completed due to covid19. So far, The Teaching council will not budge and they are very unhelpful despite the regulations that they have authority to grant registration on a case by case basis at their discretion. So be prepared to document every module, teaching placement and have all handbooks stamped for their rigid scrutiny. I appreciate there are standards but they are proving a pain to deal with.

Last edited by funkypumpkins; 29-04-2020 at 22:00.
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30-04-2020, 18:36   #5
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I appreciate it is a lot cheaper. I was in the same situation where I couldn't afford to train in Ireland.

The induction period is just for England from 2020. Scotland manages its teaching council differently. So as far as I know, Scotland is staying as one year PGDE and one year NQT. I have even heard of Scottish PGDEs even doing their NQT there on the voice for teachers page on Facebook. But I question if they got their PGDE before 2015 as you were allowed to do the induction in Ireland.

As I mentioned, I am short a month of having my induction period completed due to covid19. So far, The Teaching council will not budge and they are very unhelpful despite the regulations that they have authority to grant registration on a case by case basis at their discretion. So be prepared to document every module, teaching placement and have all handbooks stamped for their rigid scrutiny. I appreciate there are standards but they are proving a pain to deal with.
Ah I see, so the two year period has already started
Is this what you had to do? What is your opinion on it, from what I've read online it's a tough year so never mind having to do it for two years
I am researching to see if it's possible to do a 120 credit masters equivalent in Scotland at the moment but no success yet

Sorry to hear of your predicament, have you had any luck with the Teaching Council today?
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01-05-2020, 16:28   #6
funkypumpkins
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Ah I see, so the two year period has already started
Is this what you had to do? What is your opinion on it, from what I've read online it's a tough year so never mind having to do it for two years
I am researching to see if it's possible to do a 120 credit masters equivalent in Scotland at the moment but no success yet

Sorry to hear of your predicament, have you had any luck with the Teaching Council today?
I graduated in England in 2018 so I can still do my NQT in one year. Those that undertake and graduate from teacher training in England in 2020 and 2021 will have to do a 2 year induction called the early career framework.

https://www.gov.uk/government/public...ified-teachers
https://www.gov.uk/government/public...upport-package

For you, I think your best bet is to train in Scotland. NQT is still one year according to the link below.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/jobs-and...ng-in-scotland



I am still trying to register with the Teaching Council but I can only register under Route 3 Further education and I am waiting to see if they can grant me conditional registration. But it is looking like I will have to return to UK to finish as the TC are not adaptable to foreign qualifications.

Last edited by funkypumpkins; 01-05-2020 at 22:29.
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02-05-2020, 16:54   #7
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Thanks for the message
I read the link in your message, no denying it now two year induction it is. Doesn't sound fun
Will have to spend more time deciding the best path forward
Hmm, that's frustrating you'll have to go back to England to confirm your induction period
Hope it works out for you in the end, thanks for the help

Have you or anyone else heard of another country in the EU (not the UK) where you can get a similar qualification to the PME cost effectively? [With the course being in English....]
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03-05-2020, 13:34   #8
funkypumpkins
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Thanks for the message
I read the link in your message, no denying it now two year induction it is. Doesn't sound fun
Will have to spend more time deciding the best path forward
Hmm, that's frustrating you'll have to go back to England to confirm your induction period
Hope it works out for you in the end, thanks for the help

Have you or anyone else heard of another country in the EU (not the UK) where you can get a similar qualification to the PME cost effectively? [With the course being in English....]
Just to reiterate, there is no UK education system. England ,Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland organise education in their countries. As mentioned, Scotland is still one year so you could apply and it still would be a two year commitment (1 year PGDE + 1 year NQT). Best of luck.
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04-05-2020, 09:46   #9
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I would just like to add that you should keep in mind the implications brexit might have in training in the UK too.
I know it’s cheaper to study in the UK but it might be worth looking into getting a loan to train here as it does remove complications as the poster above mentioned.
I wonder is it more difficult to get a job in Ireland with a qualification from the UK? (I have no idea I’m genuinely wondering)
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06-05-2020, 16:23   #10
colm947
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Hi, thanks for your message. I had been worried about the implications of Brexit alright, it is a big gray area.
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12-05-2020, 16:43   #11
funkypumpkins
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Hi, thanks for your message. I had been worried about the implications of Brexit alright, it is a big gray area.
I still believe that deep down, you are probably better off completing Teacher Training in Ireland if your ultimate goal is to teach here. Since my last message, the Teaching Council will not budge and I am starting to begin the complaint processes of basically being told to re-do the PME instead of doing an adaptation period and education shortfall. I appreciate that there are standards to uphold but I feel the Teaching Council are incredibly ignorant of foreign trained teachers. Surely if they want to maintain high standards, they should liaise with me to head towards registration with conditions. Having a Masters in Applied Professional Studies of Education on top of my Teacher Training Diploma, it is disgraceful that there is no consideration given to my qualifications.

I know that you can get a credit union loan for teaching. Might be worth considering.
https://hiberniacollege.com/media/20...edit-union.pdf
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