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28-04-2020, 03:33   #16
movinghome..
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Primary teacher here . Whilst there’s a shortage of subs, there’s also quite of shortage of any long term work or permanent posts . Because you have a family , you will be limited geographically too, I presume ?

I’d think long and hard about spending quite a lot of money with Hibernian , being honest .
Absolutely, I am thinking long and hard about this and which road to take and I am open to suggestions on alternatives too.

The main messages from the replies here seems to be that becoming qualified and registered (not easy in themselves) are no guarantees of permanent jobs or a career in teaching which is kind of what is needed here to be honest with bringing a family over and becoming settled.

This is a big concern and really the more ideal situation would be to jump into work pretty much right away after I return (in any field really) but not sure that will be possible.

Securing part-time work while completing the process of becoming qualified to teach or any other kind of long term professional qualification would be necessary.
I am fine with taking a few steps back to get ahead again later but of course a guarantee of a decent profession/income is essential too.

Last edited by movinghome..; 28-04-2020 at 03:42.
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28-04-2020, 03:52   #17
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I don't have much advice other than what has already been offered.
Primary seems the way to go and I wish you loads of luck!
Finally, I did a career change into teaching and I have never regretted it. I'm ten years in and it's the best move I ever made.
Thanks a lot for the positivity in this post. GAA has been and prob will be a major part of my life.
Why else do you think I am bringing back 2 boys to Ireland

Irish- I can get to near fluent level too. I also do believe I have the aptitude and experience (been teaching a lot of young kids here too including 4 years at a primary public school here) to become a very good teacher if given the opportunity back home.

It is absolutely a case of taking a few big steps back to try and ensure a better future (eventually) especially for the kids. Looking at expected costs of setting up a life for the 1st years especially at the moment.
Weighing up the pros/cons and will try to figure something out soonish.

Thank you.
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28-04-2020, 09:02   #18
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Thanks a lot for the positivity in this post. GAA has been and prob will be a major part of my life.
Why else do you think I am bringing back 2 boys to Ireland

Irish- I can get to near fluent level too. I also do believe I have the aptitude and experience (been teaching a lot of young kids here too including 4 years at a primary public school here) to become a very good teacher if given the opportunity back home.

It is absolutely a case of taking a few big steps back to try and ensure a better future (eventually) especially for the kids. Looking at expected costs of setting up a life for the 1st years especially at the moment.
Weighing up the pros/cons and will try to figure something out soonish.

Thank you.
"Getting registered with teaching council"
Hmm very iffy

"Getting full time job"
Give it a few years.

" Getting subwork"
Depends

"Have real world experience"
Meh...


" GAA "
Why didn't you say so, when can you start?

Seriously though, play that trump card as much as possible.
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28-04-2020, 09:09   #19
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On a teachers salary? you would have to have a car to live rural, take at least 3 grand a year for insurance plus the cost of buying, maintaining and taxing a car. On a teachers salary with a dependent spouse and kids, I don't see how you could manage.
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28-04-2020, 09:49   #20
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On a teachers salary? you would have to have a car to live rural, take at least 3 grand a year for insurance plus the cost of buying, maintaining and taxing a car. On a teachers salary with a dependent spouse and kids, I don't see how you could manage.
He’s hardly going to be buying a Ferrari.

Living in the country, plenty of teaching experience and SEN experience, into GAA and with near fluent irish, you will be snapped up OP.
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28-04-2020, 11:40   #21
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He’s hardly going to be buying a Ferrari.

Living in the country, plenty of teaching experience and SEN experience, into GAA and with near fluent irish, you will be snapped up OP.
Cars aren't expensive in Ireland, insurance is expensive. If you don't have a 2 year no claims bonus in Ireland or the UK (because these are the only countries in the world where drivers are safe according to the insurance industry and our 'Insurance Regulator' [] says that's fine). You're talking a couple of grand just for car insurance. The banking and insurance sector in Ireland is extremely corrupt by first world standards.

On that note OP, don't forget that in Ireland retail banks CHARGE YOU to be a customer and access your own money

Don't see how being 'into GAA' = a stream of income, and if it does, that just goes to show how backwards things are. 'Oh he likes a sport, he must be qualified for this unrelated position' .

Also OP, Energy costs in Ireland are some of Europe's highest, also worth considering. Get yourself an energy efficient home if at all possible.

Food and public transport are relatively cheap (well, not extortionate) here but just about every other service and product is usually at the top end of any international price comparison. Maybe move to a more family centric place closer to where you are?
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28-04-2020, 12:21   #22
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Cars aren't expensive in Ireland, insurance is expensive. If you don't have a 2 year no claims bonus in Ireland or the UK (because these are the only countries in the world where drivers are safe according to the insurance industry and our 'Insurance Regulator' [] says that's fine). You're talking a couple of grand just for car insurance. The banking and insurance sector in Ireland is extremely corrupt by first world standards.

On that note OP, don't forget that in Ireland retail banks CHARGE YOU to be a customer and access your own money

Don't see how being 'into GAA' = a stream of income, and if it does, that just goes to show how backwards things are. 'Oh he likes a sport, he must be qualified for this unrelated position' .

Also OP, Energy costs in Ireland are some of Europe's highest, also worth considering. Get yourself an energy efficient home if at all possible.

Food and public transport are relatively cheap (well, not extortionate) here but just about every other service and product is usually at the top end of any international price comparison. Maybe move to a more family centric place closer to where you are?

You'd swear he was the first person to return to Ireland ever. Car insurance might be expensive for him the first year, but it should drop after that. The OP lives in the UK so he should be fine.

Ireland's banks aren't unique in charging fees for using current accounts etc. And it's not a fee that's going to make or break him.

Like it or not, and I'm not a fan of it, but have extra curricular activities opens doors in teaching, particularly GAA because every small town and village in the country has a GAA club. Every teacher going into an interview has the teaching qualification so it's often the extras that you can do will swing the job your way. He does have an advantage if he is a fluent Irish speaker and is willing to coach GAA. No two ways about it.

Not sure why you are going on about the energy efficient homes etc. The vast majority of homes in Ireland are 3-4 bed semi-d if you live in a town or 3-4 bed bungalow if you live in the country. Can't see why you are making it out like he wouldn't survive back in the area he grew up in.

People here generally have a good quality of life, not sure why you are basically making out like it is unaffordable. If he is a fluent Irish speaker he is more than likely from the west of Ireland where housing is more affordable. Plenty of houses available in the west suitable for families that are affordable on one decent salary or two average salaries. You're making sound like it's not worth coming home unless he's earning a six figure sum.
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28-04-2020, 12:26   #23
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The OP lives in the UK so he should be fine.
I am an Irish expat who has been living and teaching English abroad for about 15 years

I didn't know this. Assumed he lived further afield based on the above. Regarding everything else. Just painting a realistic picture. Quality of life, yes I suppose it's better than the UK. I had visions of him living somewhere like East Asia or the middle east, where wages vs costs would be more favourable.
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28-04-2020, 12:37   #24
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I am an Irish expat who has been living and teaching English abroad for about 15 years

I didn't know this. Assumed he lived further afield based on the above. Regarding everything else. Just painting a realistic picture. Quality of life, yes I suppose it's better than the UK. I had visions of him living somewhere like East Asia or the middle east, where wages vs costs would be more favourable.
I thought he was teaching English as a second language abroad too....not in the UK!!
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28-04-2020, 13:18   #25
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I thought he was teaching English as a second language abroad too....not in the UK!!
Sorry, I stand corrected. The rest of the post still stands. Expensive car insurance the first year, but it will fall. It won't be thousands forever.
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28-04-2020, 15:35   #26
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I had visions of him living somewhere like East Asia or the middle east, where wages vs costs would be more favourable.
Yes, this is bang on.

I am in East Asia and my current pay after (low) taxes here (including quite a bit of part time work along with main job) would be about double what a teacher back home would be earning per month. We have quite a bit of disposable income here at the end of each month and I understand that this will change dramatically.

But it isn't all rosy here either and this is why the (almost certain) return to Ireland. Raising kids here would be far more expensive considering education costs as they get older. Plus our 2 boys could not have the kind of freedom and enjoyment an Irish childhood would give. Plus buying a (small) home here would be very expensive relatively too- about double or more the cost in Ireland considering size.

Teaching isn't a very well paid job but with a decent amount in the bank (hopefully 110/120k by then) and a simple enough rural lifestyle..
(Yes, there will be some big initial costs, car, car insurance, housing, education, utilities etc) I think it may be doable.

The plan would be to get a habitual residence sorted right away (will have family to help with a place to stay for a couple of months or more) and then we can apply for PPS numbers for my wife and kids. We can look into some kinds of welfare programs then and take things from there- education/work, car etc

What kinds of places (or career changes) would you have in mind to go instead? We are open to other possibilities too.
I understand 100% where you are coming from with expenses and the hidden costs of everything (including banking) are horrible- I agree.
It is one of the things I am dreading.

Last edited by movinghome..; 28-04-2020 at 16:03.
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28-04-2020, 15:38   #27
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Yes, this is bang on.

I am in East Asia and my current pay after (low) taxes here (including quite a bit of part time work along with main job) would be about double what a teacher back home would be earning per month. We have quite a bit of disposable income here at the end of each month and I understand that this will change dramatically.

But it isn't all rosy here either and this is why the (almost certain) return to Ireland. Raising kids here would be far more expensive considering education costs as they get older. Plus our 2 boys could not have the kind of freedom and enjoyment an Irish childhood would give. Plus buying a (small) home here would be very expensive relatively too- about double or more the cost in Ireland considering size.

Teaching isn't a very well paid job but with a decent amount in the bank (hopefully 110/120k by then) and a simple enough rural lifestyle..
(Yes, there will be some big initial costs, car, car insurance, housing, education, utilities etc) I think it may be doable. I

The plan would be to get a habitual residence sorted right away (will have family to help with a place to stay for a couple of months or more) and then we can apply for PPS numbers for my wife and kids. We can look into some kinds of welfare programs then and take things from there- education/work, car etc

What kinds of places (or career changes) would you have in mind to go instead? We are open to other possibilities too.
I understand 100% where you are coming from with expenses and the hidden costs of everything (including banking) are horrible- I agree.
It is one of the things I am dreading.
Do you want to be a primary or secondary teacher? If so how much per year do you and your family need to live off while you qualify?
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28-04-2020, 15:54   #28
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Do you want to be a primary or secondary teacher? If so how much per year do you and your family need to live off while you qualify?
I would be happy to be a primary teacher yes.

Regarding costs per year while trying to qualify - I need to sit down properly to work it out but I would guess around 20-25k per year + an initial settling down cost of 10-15k (shipping of some stuff from here, car, utilities).
I will look into part-time work for income right away if this is possible too while doing the training to be a teacher.

Housing will be the biggest factor I think. We may have an option of being partly rent free for a few months after we move though. We aim to live in the southwest and live frugally for the most part.

We will qualify for some welfare options like child benefit too I believe which will help once we establish habitual residence.

Last edited by movinghome..; 28-04-2020 at 16:05.
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28-04-2020, 16:08   #29
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I would be happy to be a primary teacher yes.

Regarding costs per year while trying to qualify - I need to sit down properly to work it out but I would guess around 20-25k per year + an initial settling down cost of 10-15k (shipping of some stuff from here, car, utilities).
I will look into part-time work for income right away if this is possible too while doing the training to be a teacher.

Housing will be the biggest factor I think. We may have an option of being partly rent free for a few months after we move though. We aim to live in the southwest and live frugally for the most part.

We will qualify for some welfare options like child benefit too I believe which will help once we establish habitual residence.
Don’t forget tuition fees for your course!
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