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12-07-2003, 02:59   #16
sceptre
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Quote:
Originally posted by dmeehan
is this "land tax" proposed to be an annual tax or a once off say when the land is sold on?
Annual tax. You'd already be paying capital gains tax (though not currently on your principal residence).

Last edited by sceptre; 12-07-2003 at 03:02.
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14-07-2003, 23:37   #17
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the thinking is a bit wooly in that piece. On the one hand it talks about a property tax, and on the other hand it talks about recovering part of the windfall arising from infrastructural development.

These are separate but related things.

a.
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16-07-2003, 11:51   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by sligoliner
how come the "population density" carry on is NEVER applied to roads?
To be quasi-fair, it is.

There's no motorway linking Donegal and Cork just as there's no train line connecting the two places (just like Galway-Limerick, Galway-Cork, Cork-Limerick (the Limerick-Cork train line obviously doesn't count as direct, especially given that there isn't a direct train service)). Motorway development is (apart from the bit crawling around Dublin) limited to linking the major cities with Dublin, just like the few rail lines that IE wants to keep using.

I fully appreciate that IE management don't know what they're doing, don't care and that there isn't enough effort or investment put into rail though.
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26-07-2003, 21:56   #19
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http://home.eircom.net/content/irela...view=Eircomnet
Quote:
Campaign today to open rail line in west
From:ireland.com
Saturday, 26th July, 2003

12:26:56: Communities in counties along the western rail corridor will be taking part in a day of action today as part of the West on Track community campaign for the reopening of the Sligo-Limerick railway.

Events are scheduled for Collooney, Tubbercurry, Swinford, Charlestown, Kil- timagh, Claremorris, Tuam, Athenry and Gort with a further event in Ballyglunin on Saturday, August 2nd.[/B]
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28-07-2003, 21:42   #20
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http://home.eircom.net/content/irela...view=Eircomnet
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Protesters call for reopening of western rail link
From:ireland.com
Monday, 28th July, 2003

Many towns in the west of Ireland face an uncertain future, it is claimed, unless the Government redresses problems of poor infrastructure and inadequate rail services in the major urban areas.

The claim was made by independent TD, Dr Jerry Cowley, at a campaign rally in Charlestown.

He compared the vast amounts being spent on infrastructure in the Dublin region with the almost total neglect of much of the west. Towns such as Charlestown, he said, faced an uncertain future, unless the Government redressed the situation.

On Saturday, protesters walked to the disused railway tracks at Charlestown station, which played a part in inspiring John Healy to write his acclaimed Death of an Irish Town, nearly 40 years ago. During the rally there were repeated calls for the reopening of the railway between Sligo and Limerick.

The rally moved to a local car-park where speaker after speaker criticised the Government for its neglect of the west of Ireland and demanded that the reopening of the western railway line be part of an initiative to counter that neglect.

"Walk the Walk, Don't Talk the Talk," declared flyers which had been posted along the route by West-on-Track representatives.

Similar protests took place around the same time in other towns served by the western railway line - Tubbercurry, Swinford, Kiltimagh and Claremorris.

One of the rally organisers, Mr John Healy, said: "We've got a good quality of life here. The cost of living, housing is affordable. My guess is that if the trains came back, this place would experience a boom, the likes of which has never been seen here before."

Former schoolteacher, Mrs Delia Henry (93), was one of the first to sign a petition calling on the Government to reopen the line."My late mother, Winnie, was on the platform the day in 1895 when the first train puffed into Charlestown and she was there in 1962 when the last passenger train brought people to Galway for the visit of President Kennedy."

That was a happy occasion but Mrs Henry remembered many other occasions which were not. "Thousands emigrated during the forties and fifties which were hard times," she said.

"They left from the small station here in Bellaghy. Mothers would scream with emotion at seeing sons and daughters leave. We young ones watching would cry too with the sadness of it all, even though we might have no connection with those leaving."

Mrs Henry believes the line could play a valuable role in bringing commuters to major work centres such as Galway and Sligo, 56 miles and 25 miles away respectively.

Mr Eamon O'Hara, a retired electrical dealer, remembered the first black and white television sets arriving by train in the 1960s. These were treated as gingerly and respectfully as if they had been tabernacles for local churches.

"The old ways are gone but there is still a great need for a railway line," said Mr O'Hara. "There are great facilities in Charlestown, including Knock Airport three miles away. If the railway line was reopened, Charlestown would be an excellent commuter base for those working in places such as Galway, Sligo and Castlebar."

Local Sinn Féin councillor, Mr Gerry Murray, said it would cost €215 million to reopen the line, a paltry sum compared to the amounts being "squandered" on projects in Dublin.

"A staggering €200 million is being set aside for the refurbishment of the Abbey Theatre. The Government seems to attach greater importance to the cultural infrastructure of Dublin than it does to the physical infrastructure of the west of Ireland."
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19-09-2003, 11:38   #21
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Reopening of western rail link sill an option, says Brennan.

Reopening of western rail link sill an option, says Brennan.
Tim O’Brien
The Irish Times
18-September-2003
***************************
The Minister for Transport, Mr Seamus Brennan, has said he may reconsider the Strategic Rail Review’s findings that there is insufficient reason to reopen the Western Rail Corridor.

Speaking to a delegation from the Border, Midlands and Western (BMW) Regional Assembly, the Minister said he was anxious the option of re-opening the western rial link as a spur to economic development in the west be kept open.

Mr Brennan told the delegation- which travelled to Dublin to discuss development imbalances in the west – he was aware that transport was a key driver of growth and roads spending in the west had not been as fast as in the east.

Following a presentation from the BMW delegation on the importance of the Western Rail Corridor as a catalyst to development along the western seaboard, the Minister said he hoped to commission a new study into the potential of the rail link

The route from Limerick through Ennis to Galway and on to Tuam, Claremorris and Castlebar is still in place, although the crossover tracks at Athenry were taken up by Iarnród Éireann earlier this year.

The Minister, however was unable to put a specific date on when the study might be carried out or when the rail link might reopen if the new study indicated that there was sufficient potential.

The Strategic Rail Review, which was set up earlier this year, did not recommend the re-opening of the Rail corridor on the grounds of insufficient business for the railway, but this has been described as a “catch 22” situation by development groups and members of the assembly.

Galway Chamber of Commerce spokesman Dr Chris Coughlan commented that, should the ESB have taken a similar view to the Strategic Rail Review, then much of the West would will be without electricity.

The Minister also told the delegation he acknowledged how expenditure on national roads projects in the BMW regions, but said this would be increased in future years. He reiterated the Government’s commitment to achieving balanced regional development.
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18-12-2003, 23:28   #22
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Press release

http://www.transport.ie/viewitem.asp...g=ENG&loc=1345
Quote:
Transport Minister Establishes New Structure To Progress Western Rail Corridor Proposal

16 December 2003
The Minister for Transport, Séamus Brennan T.D, met yesterday (Monday, 15th December 2003) in Dublin with two organisations and local public representatives campaigning for the re-opening of the Western Rail Corridor from Sligo to Limerick to full service as a passenger and freight railway.

Minister Brennan met for two hours with a delegation from the West= On=Track group (Fr. Mícheál MacGréil S.J., Colmán Ó Raghallaigh, Martin Cunniffe, Helen Rochford Brennan, John Joe Conwell (Portumna), Peter Bowen Walsh): Inter County Rail (Councillor Michael Connolly and Martin Joe OToole) and Deputy John Carty TD and Senator Mark MacSharry.

The Minister was presented by West=On=Track with a copy of the recently completed report-Western Rail Corridor-Project Costings and Financial Projections. * (See Note).

Following the meeting Minister Brennan said that he welcomed the very thorough and comprehensive report.

"The Strategic Rail Review study was a very serious document that concluded that the Western Rail Corridor was not at present a viable proposition. I would like to stress that the Strategic Rail Review is not Government policy, it is a useful and valuable input into that policy.

The future of the Western Rail Corridor is very much on my agenda. I believe it warrants a longer and harder look. If the re-opening of this line is ever to happen then we have to come at it in a hard headed, practical way. I am committed to a policy of rebalancing the West coast with the East coast and obviously the Western Rail Corridor could play a central role in achieving this. We need to crunch the figures and reach a stage when we know exactly the investment involved.

Following this very informative and helpful meeting I have instructed officials in my Department to set up a structure that moves the process forward. It will be an engagement structure that will look at all the issues going forward. It will give a direction and a clear focus to future progress.

Under this structure we must examine how we can put together a plan that would examine re-opening the line in stages so that eventually it will all add up to the big picture that is the Western Rail Corridor. In the end it comes back to a leap of faith and vision. I know this will eventually happen. I believe in railways and in expanding them and not in closing them down. The way to go forward is to start looking at re-opening sections. But we can not throw money at projects. This is taxpayers money and in investing it we must be careful, prudent and practical.

The local authorities along the route have an important role to play. They must look again at their rezoning policies and settlement policies for the future. The reality is that we must have critical mass along the route if this plan to re-open the Western Rail Corridor is going to work".

Minister Brennan said he would be making a journey to the West early in 2004 to view for himself the exact position as regards the condition of the tracks, stations and alignment along the Western Rail Corridor.
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19-12-2003, 10:51   #23
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Anyone who honestly thinks that road is the solution to transportation is a bit stupid. Just look at England, they built more and more roads but it was never enough. Bus is a big improvement but you need other forms of transport and rail is a great option. It looks likely that the limerick sligo rail line will be opened in the future and about time!
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19-12-2003, 20:47   #24
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Well, it all depends on things like cost and population density. Rail is great for moving large volumes of people between a small number of points. Unfortunately, the Irish population is quite dispersed and this makes it a lot more difficult. The population of the West of Ireland is tiny, which doesn't help either.

I accept that if we are to increase the population of the West of Ireland, then we have to put some infrastructure in there to attract people.

My worry is that we would end up with something half-hearted. If the line isn't at least twin-track and capable of speeds of well in excess of 80 miles an hour, then there's not much point at all, because it won't really be any faster than road, and it will be much less flexible.

We'd be better building a three-lane busway in the meantime if we're that short of cash.
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19-12-2003, 21:06   #25
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What west on track(W.O.T) seem to be arguing for is a re-opening of the railway on a phased development. That seems a smarter idea than a proposed motorway.

Its a lot cheaper than any construction of any road. Once the road is up and running, people have to go and buy cars,tax,insurance and petrol just to get from A to B.

The quailty of journey is better than any car or bus and rail can accomadate freight better.

Although there is a tiny population in the West, if there is no infastructure there then its unlikely that people will want to live there.

There seems to be large support for the rail project, rather than a huge big motorway running along the west.

An 80mph dual track service would be nice, but its not what W.O.T wants. Its usually not the case of all or nothing with infastructure, anything done is better than nothing and time will probably prove than people will use rail over road any day.
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19-12-2003, 22:21   #26
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Rail is amazingly expensive to set up and maintain, considering what you actually get. The expertise you need is all too specialised. That's the problem.

If you have the density, or can foresee the density, fair enough, you should do it. But you do have to do it right to get the full benefit of a rail service.

I think it is very debatable whether 60mph rail on a one-track line is better than a bus service. For one thing, a service on a one-track system is going to infrequent, and it is difficult to add new services.

For another thing, it is pretty unreliable. If even a minor incident happens on one of the tracks, then the whole service has to be completely shut down until the problem is sorted out.

Another problem is that it makes it pretty much impossible to mix express and local services. Even with two tracks it is quite difficult, as we have found out in Dublin. If you do mix express and local services on a single line, then the local services end up not being frequent enough to be really attractive, and the 'express' services become slowed down and delayed to the extent that they aren't really express anymore.

Most people in the West of Ireland will not live near one of the stations on the line. They will still have to make a bus or car journey to use the service. They may decide that they would be as well driving or taking the bus for the whole distance.

I don't think there is any realistic prospect of freight being carried on the Limerick-Sligo line. The line is quite short, does not connect with any major ports, and doesn't have too many businesses involving heavy goods immediately alongside it. If there is only one line, the freight traffic would definitely inconvenience the passenger traffic. It would not be sufficient to have the freight running only at night on a short track, since this would mean that the freight wagons would be underutilised.

But seriously, why not consider putting in a three-lane busway as a medium-term alternative? It could easily carry up to 1000 passengers/hour in both directions at speeds of 60 to 70 miles per hour (and even more passengers at peak times, although perhaps at lower speeds). It would be cheap to buy new rolling stock. You could have a mix of express and local services. You could build nice stations along the way which would be as comfortable as train stations, and you could put in real time information to make travel more predictable. In addition, buses could travel on directly to towns and villages near to the line, giving more possibilities for routes.

The whole thing could be built and maintained using local labour and contractors, with no need to ship in specialised materaials, equipment or skilled personnel from the UK or the Continent.

Finally, as the population of the West of Ireland grows, the busway can be replaced with a two- or three-way rail line on a staged basis as finances allow.

I'm not saying this is definitely the answer, but I think it is worth putting up there and considering.

Antoin.
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20-12-2003, 00:21   #27
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I would like to nominate antoinolachtnai for the most stupid post in the history of this board and suggest that he send his CV to Irish Rail, he would make the perfect operations manager.
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20-12-2003, 12:53   #28
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We need a metro line from Dublin city centre to the airport before something like this should even be considered.
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20-12-2003, 21:29   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by sligoliner
I would like to nominate antoinolachtnai for the most stupid post in the history of this board and suggest that he send his CV to Irish Rail, he would make the perfect operations manager.
Attack the post not the poster.
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11-01-2019, 13:22   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sligoliner View Post
These people have some interesting ideas - they are going to run the railway themselves and Irish Rail won't be involved. Similar to how regional railways are run in Europe. A co-op. One more nail in the CIE coffin. It's great see Irish people waking up to the fact that the railways belong to the Irish people and no CIE management and unions. Very exciting development:
It's worth reopening this thread for this - I have seen seen the perfect solution for these people wishing to run the service themselves...
https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-as...s-trolley-boys
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