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10-01-2019, 10:21   #31
mrblack
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We bought a new Santa Fe in Navan in 2014 and traded it in 2017 for a second new one. The timing chains were not an issue in either vehicle- But the oil service interval is quite long and both the Santa Fe's have to be brought in every 6 months for an oil quality check-which we always do and if oil is not up to scratch its must be changed early. This is in addition to the annual required oil change of course. I think the engine oil lubricates the timing chain so oil quality would be important to keep the chain lubricated in accordance with manufacturing specs.

If those 6 monthly oil quality checks were not done by a main Hyundai dealer, nor the engine oil & filter changed with the recommended oil/filter by a main dealer and - then I wouldn't blame the Main dealer or Hyundai for voiding the warranty.

At the first full service of our 2017 Santa Fe the oil filler cap was not replaced properly and the oil seal failed and car died on the road suddenly luckily without any safety issues, but leaving a huge trail of oil on the road and I was sure the engine was kaput. Hyundai towed it to main dealer and examined engine and advised that it was OK as ECU cut out the engine before any damage occurred and its run perfectly since then. But dealer advised they would have replaced engine under warranty without issue. The vehicle was a year old then.

Great cars to drive I think as the Santa Fe is my wife's car and my old 2010 Honda CRV (215kms on clock) drives like a dog compared to her Santa Fe even though both are 2.2 diesels.
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10-01-2019, 10:51   #32
Henry Ford III
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Originally Posted by mrblack View Post
We bought a new Santa Fe in Navan in 2014 and traded it in 2017 for a second new one. The timing chains were not an issue in either vehicle- But the oil service interval is quite long and both the Santa Fe's have to be brought in every 6 months for an oil quality check-which we always do and if oil is not up to scratch its must be changed early. This is in addition to the annual required oil change of course. I think the engine oil lubricates the timing chain so oil quality would be important to keep the chain lubricated in accordance with manufacturing specs.

If those 6 monthly oil quality checks were not done by a main Hyundai dealer, nor the engine oil & filter changed with the recommended oil/filter by a main dealer and - then I wouldn't blame the Main dealer or Hyundai for voiding the warranty.

At the first full service of our 2017 Santa Fe the oil filler cap was not replaced properly and the oil seal failed and car died on the road suddenly luckily without any safety issues, but leaving a huge trail of oil on the road and I was sure the engine was kaput. Hyundai towed it to main dealer and examined engine and advised that it was OK as ECU cut out the engine before any damage occurred and its run perfectly since then. But dealer advised they would have replaced engine under warranty without issue. The vehicle was a year old then.

Great cars to drive I think as the Santa Fe is my wife's car and my old 2010 Honda CRV (215kms on clock) drives like a dog compared to her Santa Fe even though both are 2.2 diesels.
Easy to say that when it didn't happen.
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10-01-2019, 10:59   #33
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@ Henry Ford III My main point was that there are 6 monthly oil quality checks which need to be done and oil changed if not within spec. That's on the maintenance checklist.

If that's not done -Warranty void unless there a recall.
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10-01-2019, 16:08   #34
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Because they did not sell a car that was faulty. If they did then they would be liable to repair the fault.
The fault manifested itself a long time after the car was purchased, and falls within the remit of manufacturers warranty.
As the selling dealer is not franchised to the brand of car, they have no obligation to honour the warranty.
That falls to a franchised dealer and/or the manufacturer.
You unfortunately are completely wrong. The company who you bought the car from is 100% responsible to fix the issue under consumer law. Hyundai have a warranty which they can choose to honour or not. Read up on the sale of goods act and get your car fixed or wait for the chain to fail while annoying the wrong company.
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10-01-2019, 17:57   #35
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You unfortunately are completely wrong. The company who you bought the car from is 100% responsible to fix the issue under consumer law. Hyundai have a warranty which they can choose to honour or not. Read up on the sale of goods act and get your car fixed or wait for the chain to fail while annoying the wrong company.
So what your saying is the warranty is gone if ownership changes within the warranty period???
I got a 12 month warranty from the dealer but that period has passed.
Just out of curiosity, with all the nearly new/new cars being inported from the UK at the moment are those warranties non existent.

Update in fixing the ussue. Tried a different hyundai dealer today. Totally different attitude. Car going in next week for inspection no issue with warranty.
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10-01-2019, 18:10   #36
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Glad to hear your sorted, but a lot of miss information on this thread, EU legislation allows for all car warranties to be valid once cars are serviced according to manufacturers guidelines using genuine car parts or spurious parts that conform to the manufacture's part specifications. You just need suitable records to back that up. As it the manufacture's warranty you are calling on, you are right to go to them or their dealers.
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10-01-2019, 18:39   #37
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You unfortunately are completely wrong. The company who you bought the car from is 100% responsible to fix the issue under consumer law. Hyundai have a warranty which they can choose to honour or not. Read up on the sale of goods act and get your car fixed or wait for the chain to fail while annoying the wrong company.
Why would the seller be liable here. They were selling a used good and provided a warranty which has expired.
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10-01-2019, 19:42   #38
swarlb
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You unfortunately are completely wrong. The company who you bought the car from is 100% responsible to fix the issue under consumer law. Hyundai have a warranty which they can choose to honour or not. Read up on the sale of goods act and get your car fixed or wait for the chain to fail while annoying the wrong company.
I've 40 years experience in the motor trade, parts, service and warranty, all with main dealerships. As I've pointed out on numerous posts here, what the customer should do is complain to Hyundai as regards the warranty which still exists on the car. And keep on complaining, and complaining. The warranty is with Hyundai, and no one else. The company that sold the car would have sold it on the basis it was still under the manufacturers warranty.
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10-01-2019, 21:35   #39
Del2005
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Why would the seller be liable here. They were selling a used good and provided a warranty which has expired.
Because our law makes them. As I have repeatedly posted here a warranty is in addition to your consumer rights and Ireland has some of the best consumer protection in the world. The rest of the EU had to implement a 2 year warranty for consumers, Ireland didn't as our Sale of Goods and Supply of Services Act gives way more.
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10-01-2019, 21:46   #40
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So what your saying is the warranty is gone if ownership changes within the warranty period???
I got a 12 month warranty from the dealer but that period has passed.
Just out of curiosity, with all the nearly new/new cars being inported from the UK at the moment are those warranties non existent.
A warranty can have any terms and conditions that the seller wants to apply. Originally to get warranty work car manufacturers required that everything had to be done by their franchises to maintain it, the EU told them no. Manufacturers warranties used to be none transferable, again EU said no. But Irish consumer law has no restrictions and the responsibility lies fully with the company that sold you the item to resolve.


The sale of goods act only limitation for action is the statute of limitations, obviously the onus on the claimant increase the nearer you get to the Statute of limitations.

The nearly new cars will have whatever is left of the mandatory 2 years manufacturer warranty. Any longer warranty is a distributor/dealer warranty and you need to go to the UK to get the issue resolved if you can't get the seller to arrange for the work to be done here. You have essentially zero consumer protection buying 2nd hand in the UK.

Well done on getting it resolved. But you have now weaken your chances of getting satisfaction if something else goes wrong with the car.
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10-01-2019, 21:48   #41
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Because our law makes them. As I have repeatedly posted here a warranty is in addition to your consumer rights and Ireland has some of the best consumer protection in the world. The rest of the EU had to implement a 2 year warranty for consumers, Ireland didn't as our Sale of Goods and Supply of Services Act gives way more.
You’re saying someone who buys a used car gets what sort of protection? Can you give some of examples of this happening?
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10-01-2019, 22:10   #42
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You’re saying someone who buys a used car gets what sort of protection? Can you give some of examples of this happening?
The poster in question bangs the sale of good act drum regularly on here. I don’t bother engaging with them any more. Can you imagine how much more expensive secondhand cars would be in this country if the scenario outlined by this poster was actually reflected in real world cases? How much margin would a secondhand retailer need to build into a sale to ensure they were covered against this kind of open-ended responsibility that the poster maintains is required?

Meanwhile back here in the real world thankfully the OP had the good sense to ignore the majority of the nonsense that was posted in this thread and seems to be on the way to getting the issue resolved by finding a dealer who is actually interested in doing their job.
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11-01-2019, 01:45   #43
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You’re saying someone who buys a used car gets what sort of protection? Can you give some of examples of this happening?
I know a few different garages that have had to replace cars under the sale of goods act. I can't give information because I was told in confidence.
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11-01-2019, 01:46   #44
Del2005
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The poster in question bangs the sale of good act drum regularly on here. I don’t bother engaging with them any more. Can you imagine how much more expensive secondhand cars would be in this country if the scenario outlined by this poster was actually reflected in real world cases? How much margin would a secondhand retailer need to build into a sale to ensure they were covered against this kind of open-ended responsibility that the poster maintains is required?

Meanwhile back here in the real world thankfully the OP had the good sense to ignore the majority of the nonsense that was posted in this thread and seems to be on the way to getting the issue resolved by finding a dealer who is actually interested in doing their job.

Read below and post back where it says cars are excluded from the act.

http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/1...nacted/en/html
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11-01-2019, 09:48   #45
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I know a few different garages that have had to replace cars under the sale of goods act. I can't give information because I was told in confidence.
So, no, basically.

I could tell you, but it's a secret.

Giving a brief synopsis without mentioning brands or regions will hardly reveal you?
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