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31-12-2018, 20:50   #16
srmf5
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Out of interest what haplogroup is it (probably R1b, but did you get a subgroup)?
Yes, it's R1b. Below that it's L21, DF13, DF23, FGC6545 and BY3440 positive with the terminal given as R-Y160102.
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01-01-2019, 20:07   #17
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I'm assuming your surname might begin with a 'K' based on that Y-DNA eh?
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02-01-2019, 12:28   #18
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I'm assuming your surname might begin with a 'K' based on that Y-DNA eh?
There are no flies on you. There's no need to worry about anyone tracking me down with a common surname like that.
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02-01-2019, 13:36   #19
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Yes, it's R1b. Below that it's L21, DF13, DF23, FGC6545 and BY3440 positive with the terminal given as R-Y160102.
Sorry to derail slightly but what level of Y dna testing did you do to get these results?
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02-01-2019, 14:11   #20
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Sorry to derail slightly but what level of Y dna testing did you do to get these results?
I ordered the Big Y with FTDNA. FTDNA tend to have big reductions during sale periods such as Christmas so most wait to order until there's a sale.
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02-01-2019, 14:17   #21
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The great thing about the BigY (though expensive) is that it actually sequences a large chunk of the Y-Chromosome. So not only does it check if a person is positive for known mutations it also discovers SNP mutations which are unique to that persons lineage.

So for example if you were to get a 2nd cousin to test you would see list of mutations that were inherited from last common ancestor on Y-Chromosome (eg. Great-Grandfather).

A really interesting example is work been done among the O'Brien's. Basically they got 'Baron Inchiquin' (Conor Myles John O'Brien, 18th Baron Inchiquin) to do a BigY test. He's the 32nd Great-Grandson of Brian Boru. As a result you can use him as a scaffold to gradually build out the lineage eg. see where various men with name O'Brien branched off etc.

In the case of srmf5 above, the 'chief of the name' has also done BigY. As a result there's general idea using some of dating methods on when some of the branches first arose.
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10-01-2019, 17:12   #22
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I'm an American with some Irish heritage and over here it would be very unusual to find someone who was 100% anything, unless they were a recent immigrant.

That said, the DNA mixes should be taken with a grain of salt. I have mine up on Ancestry, 23andMe, and other sites (my dad was adopted - we were searching for his bio family & found them), and each mix is a little bit different from the other.

Ancestry says I'm 34% Irish/Scottish, 48% British/Northwestern European, 13% Portuguese & 3% French.

23andMe says I'm 34% Irish/British, 19% Northwestern European, 25% Portuguese and 15% French/German with a little bit of Scandinavian and Sub Saharan African.

For the record, my mother's side has been in the US a long time and are Scottish (who lived in Donegal at the time they immigrated), English and German-Swiss. My father's paternal great grandparents came from the Azores and his maternal great grandparents immigrated from Ireland.

So it may be that another site has a different interpretation. Or you could just be 100% Irish, which is pretty cool and probably pretty rare all things considered.
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10-01-2019, 19:47   #23
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I'm an American with some Irish heritage and over here it would be very unusual to find someone who was 100% anything, unless they were a recent immigrant.

That said, the DNA mixes should be taken with a grain of salt. I have mine up on Ancestry, 23andMe, and other sites (my dad was adopted - we were searching for his bio family & found them), and each mix is a little bit different from the other.

So it may be that another site has a different interpretation. Or you could just be 100% Irish, which is pretty cool and probably pretty rare all things considered.
Well these are my results with the different companies:
Ancestry: 98% Ireland and Scotland and 2% England, Wales, and Northwestern Europe.
FTDNA: 100% British Isles
MyHeritage: 100% Irish, Scottish and Welsh

Mother
Ancestry: 100% Ireland and Scotland
FTDNA: 100% British Isles
MyHeritage: 85.1% Irish, Scottish and Welsh, 14.9% English
Living DNA: 100% Ireland

Father
FTDNA: 99% British Isles and <1% South America
MyHeritage: 100% Irish, Scottish and Welsh

Paternal aunt
Ancestry: 100% Ireland and Scotland

Paternal Great aunt
Ancestry: 98% Ireland and Scotland, 2% England, Wales and Northwestern Europe
MyHeritage: 100% Irish, Scottish and Welsh

The results are all in the high 90s except for my mum's MyHeritage result. I only know of Irish ancestry so all my family would fit in with the recent immigrant category if we were living in America (that or our ancestors only married Irish people). Of course, I don't think that my ancestors were only Irish since there were Normans in Ireland and there probably is some English ancestry. One of my ancestors was supposed to have been Church of Ireland which itself likely indicates a link to Britain. England is the only other ancestry that gets a percentage (well except South America but I think it's safe to ignore that as noise). However, in the time frame that these autosomal tests cover, they could have all been Irish.
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10-01-2019, 21:38   #24
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I have a US friend whose ethnicity on Ancestry shows 44% Irish (steadily increasing every time they update). She has no known Irish ancestry. American ancestry is not my specialty but applying the basic rules, I've traced her tree back multiple generations. I've found some people who have Irish-y sounding names but no one who puts Ireland as a birthplace or a parent's birthplace. Highest match is a paternal second cousin which I've confirmed the connection to, so we're not looking at an NPE. Any thoughts?
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10-01-2019, 21:48   #25
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I have a US friend whose ethnicity on Ancestry shows 44% Irish (steadily increasing every time they update). She has no known Irish ancestry. American ancestry is not my specialty but applying the basic rules, I've traced her tree back multiple generations. I've found some people who have Irish-y sounding names but no one who puts Ireland as a birthplace or a parent's birthplace. Highest match is a paternal second cousin which I've confirmed the connection to, so we're not looking at an NPE. Any thoughts?
Where is her ancestry from and an estimate of percentages if possible? Does she have ancestry from Scotland or even somewhere else in Britain? It would make more sense if her ancestry was from Britain rather than somewhere like Germany that she'd be getting these percentages due to some overlap between the regions with her ancestry being assigned to the wrong region. Some people do seem to get strange percentages with the ethnicity estimates though. Ancestry can be to be quite bad for some people with southern European ancestry from what I've seen online.
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10-01-2019, 23:00   #26
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Originally Posted by pinkypinky View Post
I have a US friend whose ethnicity on Ancestry shows 44% Irish (steadily increasing every time they update). She has no known Irish ancestry. American ancestry is not my specialty but applying the basic rules, I've traced her tree back multiple generations. I've found some people who have Irish-y sounding names but no one who puts Ireland as a birthplace or a parent's birthplace. Highest match is a paternal second cousin which I've confirmed the connection to, so we're not looking at an NPE. Any thoughts?
It could definitely be overlap, especially if she has heritage elsewhere in the British Isles.

I'm assuming the trail has gone cold before you've been able to find their immigration records. Do you have access to the US records on Ancestry?

A few other things that come to mind:

Name changes. Some of my family members changed the spelling of their names shortly after coming to the US. I had one ancestor enter the US as a Haughey in 1848. Within a generation, that become Hoey. Then it changed back to Haughey. Then it became Hay. And then it became Hoey again. The Portuguese were even worse with their 2 surnames which always got whittled down to one. The sons of Antone and Maria Pereira Oliveira may have started life as Joao Pereira Oliveira and Stephano Pereira Oliveira but ended up as John Oliver and Steven Perry in later records.

And some people just disappear. There are a few lines where it's just a dead end. I'm convinced that there's always some luck involved in genealogical research, especially in a country like the US, which was big and not always well-organized in the early years.

Last edited by metaoblivia; 10-01-2019 at 23:08.
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10-01-2019, 23:20   #27
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Family lore of Scottish ancestry but literally no one in her tree with a birthplace outside the US (she's Texas but some Kentucky, Arkansas, Louisana ancestry as well). One French Canadian ancestor found so far (gg grandmother). I have more work to do on the tree.

I've just looked at it again and it's actually 44% Irish and Scottish. 55% England, Wales and Northwestern Europe.

Yes, have US Ancestry access (I'm a pro genealogist (Irish) so I have them all)
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10-01-2019, 23:29   #28
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Originally Posted by srmf5 View Post

The results are all in the high 90s except for my mum's MyHeritage result. I only know of Irish ancestry so all my family would fit in with the recent immigrant category if we were living in America (that or our ancestors only married Irish people). Of course, I don't think that my ancestors were only Irish since there were Normans in Ireland and there probably is some English ancestry. One of my ancestors was supposed to have been Church of Ireland which itself likely indicates a link to Britain. England is the only other ancestry that gets a percentage (well except South America but I think it's safe to ignore that as noise). However, in the time frame that these autosomal tests cover, they could have all been Irish.
Yes, the autosomal tests focus on more recent ancestors. For example, my dad was placed into the Portuguese and Muenster Irish ethnicity groups on Ancestry. And he has matched with cousins from the US, but also from Brazil, Portugal and Ireland.

My mom, however, was placed into the ethnicity groups for "settlers of the American MidWest," with specific states outlined because most of her ancestors immigrated to the US in the 1600s, and she's not as closely tied to Europe as my dad is. All of her cousins (and she has thousands of 4th cousins or closer) are American.

I'm sure there are Americans who are 100% of something, it's just rare, especially for those who have been here for generations.
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10-01-2019, 23:40   #29
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Family lore of Scottish ancestry but literally no one in her tree with a birthplace outside the US (she's Texas but some Kentucky, Arkansas, Louisana ancestry as well). One French Canadian ancestor found so far (gg grandmother). I have more work to do on the tree.

I've just looked at it again and it's actually 44% Irish and Scottish. 55% England, Wales and Northwestern Europe.

Yes, have US Ancestry access (I'm a pro genealogist (Irish) so I have them all)
The 44% is probably reflecting her Scottish ancestry then. After all the category is called Ireland and Scotland. If her only family lore is of ancestry from Scotland, then her percentages don't seem to be too surprising. Even if she was descended only from colonials from the 1600s, she'd still be assigned ancestry from Europe since there's no American category after all. You would expect a French percentage with a French Canadian ancestor but that could have fallen into the Northwestern Europe category.
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10-01-2019, 23:52   #30
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Family lore of Scottish ancestry but literally no one in her tree with a birthplace outside the US (she's Texas but some Kentucky, Arkansas, Louisana ancestry as well). One French Canadian ancestor found so far (gg grandmother). I have more work to do on the tree.

I've just looked at it again and it's actually 44% Irish and Scottish. 55% England, Wales and Northwestern Europe.

Yes, have US Ancestry access (I'm a pro genealogist (Irish) so I have them all)
Scottish would make sense given those numbers and family lore. I assume the French Canadian ancestor is connected to Louisiana.

What's the farthest year you've traced her family back to? If she has English/Scottish heritage in particular, the family could have been in the US for a very long time. But then they would probably have some roots on the East coast, and that would be key to tracing them back to Europe.
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