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02-01-2014, 21:56   #16
riffmongous
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You need to read the great little book by Leo Rossen 'The JOYs of Yiddish'. Very funny and very thought-making.

tac, Jewish but not Yiddish.
I think I saw the german translation of it today in a bookstore, it's like a glossary right? (Same author, but it was just called Jiddisch)
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02-01-2014, 22:04   #17
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Isn't Yiddish making something of a comeback due to the increasing size of the Hasidic Jewish communities in Israel, the United States, and in some other countries?

I wouldn't imagine it has been spoken in Ireland for a good many years, which is a shame as it's a remarkable language. I understand that Israel didn't adopt it as an official language as it was felt it would discriminate against Sephardic Jews.
Interesting, I honestly can't say I am familiar with the phrase Hasidic, could you make sum them up for me in a nutshell, in your own words preferably, I can't say I was enlightened as to why they they are so distinct after some internet searching (I read they are more into mysticism and having religion for the common man, but also that they are orthodox)

I was first introduced to it be some non jewish german friends who sing some of their songs
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04-01-2014, 21:37   #18
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Interesting, I honestly can't say I am familiar with the phrase Hasidic, could you make sum them up for me in a nutshell, in your own words preferably, I can't say I was enlightened as to why they they are so distinct after some internet searching (I read they are more into mysticism and having religion for the common man, but also that they are orthodox)

I was first introduced to it be some non jewish german friends who sing some of their songs
Hasidic refers to specific streams of Orthodox Judaism. The Hassidic movement started in 17th century following the Cossack rebellions. Most Hassids were Yiddish speakers, but so were the more traditional Litvacks (Lithuanians) who opposed the Hassidic movement.
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07-01-2014, 12:30   #19
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If you want to hear Yiddish today you'd better go to New York.
There's also thousands of Yiddish speakers in London as well with strong Hassidic communities in Stamford Hill and Golders Green. I was only in IKEA on Sunday and there were loads of them speaking Yiddish. Similarly I was flying to Tel Aviv a few months ago from Luton and the majority of the flight over were London and Manchester Jews speaking Yiddish. They're a bit like people from Quebec, they flit effortlessly between the two languages.
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07-01-2014, 12:33   #20
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Was it Yiddish or Hebrew? Nowadays there are far more Hebrew speakers than Yiddish.
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07-01-2014, 13:54   #21
FTA69
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Was it Yiddish or Hebrew? Nowadays there are far more Hebrew speakers than Yiddish.
Definitely Yiddish. It's very commonly used amongst the Hareidi Jews in England.
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07-01-2014, 15:23   #22
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I think I saw the german translation of it today in a bookstore, it's like a glossary right? (Same author, but it was just called Jiddisch)
He's written several books about Yiddish, including Hooray for Yiddish and The Joy of Yiddish. The latter is more than just a glossary, it's an amusing history of the language along with several anecdotes to explain the etymology of certain words, including the famous story about the stolen camel to explain how the word shmuck evolved from meaning a piece of jewelry to being a term of contempt for someone you may have little time for.

Yiddish or Jiddisch is simply a transliteration of the German word Jüdisch, meaning "Jewish". Yiddish is after all essentially a dialect, or several dialects, of German with a significant imported vocabulary from Hebrew and written in Hebrew script. Much of it is mutually intelligible by German speakers, so long as they don't have to read it.
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07-01-2014, 17:50   #23
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Jim Connolly released an election leaflet in Yiddish in 1902 (still didn't get elected)

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09-01-2014, 10:27   #24
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He's written several books about Yiddish, including Hooray for Yiddish and The Joy of Yiddish. The latter is more than just a glossary, it's an amusing history of the language along with several anecdotes to explain the etymology of certain words, including the famous story about the stolen camel to explain how the word shmuck evolved from meaning a piece of jewelry to being a term of contempt for someone you may have little time for.

Yiddish or Jiddisch is simply a transliteration of the German word Jüdisch, meaning "Jewish". Yiddish is after all essentially a dialect, or several dialects, of German with a significant imported vocabulary from Hebrew and written in Hebrew script. Much of it is mutually intelligible by German speakers, so long as they don't have to read it.
While Yiddish is primarily Germanic, a significant proportion of the words come from Hebrew, as is the case with most diaspora Jewish languages. There's also an argument as to the origins of the word schmuck in Yiddish, whether it's German, Polish, or other.
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11-01-2014, 20:58   #25
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For anyone interested, here's an interesting video about the RoseEttaCohen Method of Learning Yiddish.
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06-05-2019, 22:30   #26
ILoveYourVibes
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I know this is an old thread so sorry for bumping it. ( I HATE when people bump old threads and here is me doing it!)

My maternal great grandparents spoke it as their first lingua franca.

She was actually a jew from New York he was a jew from Ukraine. She came to study nursing in Dublin he emigrated here. They met and married. He spoke Russian as well as Yiddish she spoke hasidic yiddish he spoke eastern yiddish. There are lots of different dialects.


There was actually an Irish dialect of yiddish separate to the dialects my grandparents spoke. You are correct though to say its hardly spoken now.

There is a chabad community in Ireland they use litvish Yiddish. Rabbi Zalman lent is the leader.

The diff in dialects can be vast. My grandfather's yiddish was very influenced by Russian and Ukrainian. And my grandmother's very germanic.

Irish Yiddish is called Hiberno Yiddish.




Benny cake is partially correct.

Israel is 50% mizrahi jews(arab jews) and 10% sephardi. There are also beta Israel (Ethopian jews)

Sephardi jews spoke Ladino and Mizrahi jews spoke/speak arabic.

Obviously they all had a basis in bibilcal hebrew so modern hebrew was invented.

Russian though and arabic is still spoken at home by many in Israel.

So inclusivity was a motivator. But also to a lot of non yiddish speakers some dialects sound very like German. I think that played a part too.

The largest speaking communities in are New York today with some in Israel.

I can't speak it at all. But its still being learnt.

Again sorry for bumping the old thread. You can lock or delete this if you want

Here is a funny video of James Cagney speaking Yiddish

Funny fact James Cagney was actually fluent in Yiddish. He learnt it from the jewish kids he used to play with.




Pretty AWFUL stereotypical Irish cop character which annoys me of course!

Last edited by ILoveYourVibes; 06-05-2019 at 22:39.
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06-05-2019, 23:04   #27
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I reckon Yiddish no longer edists as a spoken language in Europe.

I heard it only once. I flew from NY to Montreal a few years ago. If you remember it was the day some loony attacked the parliament in Ottawa, so although we didn't know the reason, the security at Montreal Airport was huge. We queued for about two hours in a line that snaked like about six conjoined letter Ss. You would pass the same person in another part of the line about ten times. There were two very obviously Orthodox Jews in the queue, and each time they passed each other they exchanged remarks in what sounded very like German, but of course it had to be Yiddish.

A few years ago I visited the Jewish museum in Istanbul and picked up a few CDs of Ladino songs. I had only ever previously heard it in the 1970s in a tv programme about Sarajevo. It was strange to hear a lady singing in a type of Spanish with a heavy Slav accent.

Last edited by feargale; 07-05-2019 at 00:17.
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07-05-2019, 00:24   #28
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I used to work with few Jewish colleagues in NYC and had Yiddish words explained to me - I have no idea of how much Yiddish is spoken in Europe, but it’s influence is widespread in NYC. Considering the levels of immigration there are few Irish but many Yiddish loan words in American English in daily use. No doubt there are more but these few come to mind - klutz, spiel, schmuck, kosher, schlep, mentch, glitch, chutzpah, schmaltz, schmooz, schtick. Just watch an episode of Seinfeld or Sex in the City. And klezmer music is becoming more common.
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07-05-2019, 10:14   #29
tac foley
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Oy.

You need to read the excellent book about Yiddish, called 'The jOYS of Yiddish' by Leo Rosten. It's very gemutlich.
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07-05-2019, 10:21   #30
ILoveYourVibes
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I used to work with few Jewish colleagues in NYC and had Yiddish words explained to me - I have no idea of how much Yiddish is spoken in Europe, but it’s influence is widespread in NYC. Considering the levels of immigration there are few Irish but many Yiddish loan words in American English in daily use. No doubt there are more but these few come to mind - klutz, spiel, schmuck, kosher, schlep, mentch, glitch, chutzpah, schmaltz, schmooz, schtick. Just watch an episode of Seinfeld or Sex in the City. And klezmer music is becoming more common.
Klezmer music is HUGE in Europe...

This is Dobrovnotch covering Du Hast by Rammstein.



These guys are Russian obv but are based in the EU.



Daniel Kahn and the painted Bird do a lot of Yiddish mixed with English songs

Daniel Kahn and the painted Bird are American but based in Berlin.







Daniel Kahn covering Lenard Cohen's Hallelujah" - in Yiddish



Spock speaking his mother tongue




Last edited by ILoveYourVibes; 07-05-2019 at 10:45.
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