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01-10-2010, 00:09   #61
Patricide
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Aachener here. Moved over about 5 months ago with zero german. Have enough to get by now but my grammer is far from perfect, but I have a job and im settling in nicely.
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01-10-2010, 00:10   #62
Orla_inka
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Anybody driving over?

I miss my Club Orange and Finches orange.

If anyone was driving over and could bring some over, I would be in seventh heaven.

I also miss Brunches, but I guess driving over with a load of ice cream is asking too much

I live near Heidelberg at the French boarder.
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01-10-2010, 18:46   #63
 
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I hate language schools. They are a rip off both for people working there and students.

If anyone asks about learning German I tell them that there are Germans crying out for tandem partners in most universities. .. Also, I think it is a good way to meet lots of young people. Just post a message on the boards.
It's the best method in my opinion as well, provided you have some basics first.

I lived in Erlangen and used this website, which is also good for the Nuremberg area.

I gave the first three months of my time in Germany with barely anyone to talk to. It was miserable! I stubbornly avoided Irish pubs as I felt I'd just get into a lazy habit of hanging out solely with Anglophones and learn no German. I discovered the Spachduo website, created a profile, and received loads of emails from Germans. Orla is right: many are really eager to find native speakers to practice with. It's a great way to make friends too. I made some brilliant ones.

My only problem with tandempartnership is that if a big disparity exists between the level of skill that you and your partner possesses (and this often happens because the Germans that go for it usually have very good English), then this can lead to you using more English than German. If you start off in English and are having a brilliant conversation, it can be really hard to switch to German. That's just what I found, but then again, I lack will power

I also told my tandempartners that I was doing it to make friends as much as anything else and for the most part that worked too. I also met a group of Americans from Toy Town, great guys, and I managed to get them and my tandempartners to meet regularly for some brilliant evenings out.

In short, I couldn't recommend the method highly enough if you're looking to get to know people and practice German.

Last edited by Amtmann; 01-10-2010 at 18:53.
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01-10-2010, 23:57   #64
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Nice link, there. Yes, I didn't think about the disparity of language levels.

When I came to Germany first, I was passing through ... that was years and years and ye...ago. I avoided speaking German as much as I could, only speaking it when the other person could not speak English.

After a year and I was still here: I thought that I really had to do something about the language. That is where I hit my first (of many) stone wall. Unfortunately, Germans want to practice their English at every chance. And they are so fookin' hartnäckig (persistent)

How often did I hear someone suggest that I speak German and they would speak English to me? Well, I am not really here for you to speak English to me.

I still hear the same over again. Others in the same boat. "You speak German and I speak English".

You need that all-important willpower to answer, you need to speak/learn the language of the country.

It is very hard not to come across as being rude. I just am.
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03-10-2010, 17:33   #65
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I have good days and bad days with my german. The best thing to do is to stop reading english websites, i find this hard to do, but maybe try it for a week.

But if you are a beginner, get a childrens book. Maybe one you remember from your childhood and start there.

Immersion is the key to learning. Put yellow stickies on thing in your flat, such as the doop, press, room, knives etc. Learning by association is easier.

use whatever german you have, even if it's just numbers at the start. If will build up your confidence and over time more vocab will come.
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03-10-2010, 21:02   #66
 
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But if you are a beginner, get a childrens book. Maybe one you remember from your childhood and start there.
Something like this is ideal.
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08-10-2010, 13:37   #67
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I'm moving to Freiburg in Nov. Moving over to the GF once I finish my PhD here (submitting in a week or two).

Must admit I am a bit worried as I have no German and no money to do a course.<snip>
You should relax about the language.
You have the best teacher at home by moving in with a german chick IF you try and speak the lingo with her at home.
Most people I know with excellent german have german boyfiriend/girlfriends.
(the others are Dutch or freaks of nature that speak 15 different languages)
And being german they have a network of german friends where the social language is German (as opposed to international folks who speak English amongst themselves)

I even noticed some of my mates coming on in quantam leaps just after moving in with a german, especially with the accent.

The main thing is not to give up and persevere with it. Its not as hard as you think.
BTW- you will just ignore the worst of the grammar after a while anyhow. Once you have the vocab and the sentence structure, you'll be able to communicate 100% and THAT is what matters, not having your der die das ****e right in every last case. (Although for written german you do have to be pretty spot on, but you cant get a job as a paper pushing civil servant as a foreigner anyhow i dont think!)
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16-11-2010, 14:03   #68
 
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What kind of job opportunities are on offer in Germany for someone who has only a very basic grasp of the language. What job sites did you guys look at?
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16-11-2010, 19:23   #69
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Dish washer(spüler), Waiter(kellner) or warehouse worker(lagerhaus arbeiter).

If you have a degree the skys the limit though.
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18-11-2010, 09:37   #70
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the job centre has currently 641,507 job positions open.
and some specifically for english speakers.

i.e. by searching with "english" as my term and "München" i.e. munich as the city, 100+ results came and as an example heres a callcentre looking for NATIVE speakers in munich

english speaking call centre job in munich

German jobcentre job database main homepage
http://jobboerse.arbeitsagentur.de/

EDIT: or search for jobs scrubbing floors and cleaning the bogs as mentioned above!!

Last edited by munchkin_utd; 18-11-2010 at 09:45.
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20-11-2010, 12:24   #71
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So glad I'm in germany now and not at home. Working again and have a shoooot load of holidays compared to what I had in Ireland.
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20-11-2010, 13:02   #72
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I'm living in Darmstadt! Again, as has been said previously if i try and speak german (i'm here 8 weeks, didn't have a word of german when i arrived) germans immediately pick up on the fact that i'm struggling and answer me in english which is the last thing i want! Also i'm here with other irish people so the social language is always english and I study in English! I also agree that language courses are a waste of time!
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01-12-2010, 16:21   #73
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My only problem with tandempartnership is that if a big disparity exists between the level of skill that you and your partner possesses (and this often happens because the Germans that go for it usually have very good English), then this can lead to you using more English than German. If you start off in English and are having a brilliant conversation, it can be really hard to switch to German. That's just what I found, but then again, I lack will power
My tandem partner is the missus. We were having this trouble at the beginning as well as her english was farrrrr better than my German (she's a translator) so we made a rule: We speak alternating months only english or German. We switched to German for December this morning, just like that. We speak, email and skype in the requisite language so we get a good month of "immersion" (though I speak german at work these days now as well so it's less critical).

It's a stereotype that Germans follow the rules doggedly, but it's not far from the truth, so if anyone is having trouble with a tandem partner, make it a rule that you only speak x language this week/month and alternate. It's fair on both parties. Worked for me anyway. Oh, I did intensive German classes when i first arrived here, and I wouldn't dismiss them as quickly as some on here, with the right school/teacher of course.
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11-12-2010, 15:16   #74
 
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It's a stereotype that Germans follow the rules doggedly, but it's not far from the truth.
Yesterday in Nuremberg I was with a few Americans and we came to a pedestrian crossing where the pedestrian light was red. The road we wanted to cross was little more than a lane and there was no traffic in sight. We were four, and there was also a woman with a small child at the crossing waiting for the light to go green. One of the American guys looked left and right, saw that there was nothing coming, and crossed the road, though the light was still red. Suddenly the woman called angrily after him "Hallo!!! Die ist eine kleine Kind!". In other words, "how dare you set such a bad example to my child". It was an eye opener!
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11-12-2010, 15:23   #75
 
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Yesterday in Nuremberg I was with a few Americans and we came to a pedestrian crossing where the pedestrian light was red. The road we wanted to cross was little more than a lane and there was no traffic in sight. We were four, and there was also a woman with a small child at the crossing waiting for the light to go green. One of the American guys looked left and right, saw that there was nothing coming, and crossed the road, though the light was still red. Suddenly the woman called angrily after him "Hallo!!! Die ist eine kleine Kind!". In other words, "how dare you set such a bad example to my child". It was an eye opener!
Yeah they can be a bit crazy like that. You were corrupting the little tykes whole world view with that breech of protocol. Still thou if you think thats bad just don't let on that you pee standing up or you will really here all about it!!!!
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