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21-06-2020, 11:45   #16
Wesser
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Yes of course it is.... as a salaried pharmacist you could seek out a 3 day contract or part time contract.

You would then earn 3/5 of fulltime pay.

But as a business owner or partner in a pharmacy then i dont think that would be possible. Too much work to be done
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21-06-2020, 11:48   #17
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It is possible to work as a locum pharmacist. You are self employed and cover days off for the regular pharmacist. This can be done through word of mouth or
via an agency who take a percentage of your wages. The hours can be erratic and you would be covering weekends and holidays of other pharmacists. It can involve long days and lots of travel, especially if you don’t live in a big city. In hospital pharmacy it is possible to work part time but you would almost always have a second masters degree which you get in your first few years of working full time in a hospital so it’s not part time straight away.
If you don’t like hard work then pharmacy is not for you. The degree and placements are hard work and you need to show commitment to get through it all.
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21-06-2020, 11:54   #18
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Also i think it possible to take a part time salaried contract... no? Apart from being a locum?
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21-06-2020, 12:57   #19
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Originally Posted by GalwayGrrrrrl View Post
It is possible to work as a locum pharmacist. You are self employed and cover days off for the regular pharmacist. This can be done through word of mouth or
via an agency who take a percentage of your wages. The hours can be erratic and you would be covering weekends and holidays of other pharmacists. It can involve long days and lots of travel, especially if you don’t live in a big city. In hospital pharmacy it is possible to work part time but you would almost always have a second masters degree which you get in your first few years of working full time in a hospital so it’s not part time straight away.
If you don’t like hard work then pharmacy is not for you
. The degree and placements are hard work and you need to show commitment to get through it all.
So in relation to what our other dude was saying, "physio vs pharmacy is not easy at all" - in terms of the work I'm currently doing, basic MSK therapy, the same as most every private physio does - I mean it's a day job, it's easy.
It's certainly not hard.

But then perhaps hard is relative.

On the matter of the pharmacy degree itself, 4 year BSc and 1 year Masters - when you say THAT'S hard and requires commitment.... do you mean, forget 9 to 5, you're talking early morning to late night type of deal?
If you're involved in extra-curricular heavily - expect to put that on the back burner during this degree - type of thing?

To be perfectly honest, and by no means trying to pat myself on the back but, I have no issue with the intellectual burden or concept understanding - my issue is time constraints primarily.

Physio, 20 hour per week + course work/placement - I do that in my sleep.

But pharmacy, I know 1st year is similar to that, the rest I'm not sure of however....?
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21-06-2020, 13:01   #20
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TMK there are sort of agency shifts available. Don't know the website but the pay rates are very high. If you're demand for money is low, I'd say a couple of shifts per week would make you enough.
You see, this is the type of information that makes me think, "this line of work was tailor made for me".

And then "GalwayGal" saying, "lolwut? Fingers to the bone mate, forget your old life, pharmacy now is your life".
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21-06-2020, 15:40   #21
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If you work in a rural village then you most certainly can be contracted part time by the pharmacist who owns it, like I said I know someone who does as it suits her lifestyle and situation. Add to that you won't be rushed off your feet.
My physio on the other hand charges €20/45 min and is out the door. He loves it and has a loyal client base that travel fairly far to him. He could easily do 30 hours a week and charge more.
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21-06-2020, 15:49   #22
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lol - good one!

But in essence that's what I AM doing at the moment.
I got a base cert in MSK and tagged a bunch of certs in all the "knot-removing" modalities onto it.

In theory, everything a uni-trained physio can offer in terms of hands on modalities, I can actually offer (probably more actually, cause I went on a cert bender and did everything on the market).

Issue arises in,
1) most people like to work with an actual uni trained physio
2) naturally a uni qualification is held in much higher regard and you can work in a hospital with rehabilitation patients etc.
3) diagnostic and overall anatomical knowledge of physios totally eclipses my knowledge base in that sense. They learn about muscle attachment by way of dissecting cadavers for Christ sakes.


The question here was pharmacy specifically, it's feasible to cut that stressful "all-in" working week of 40/50 hours down to bite size, 25/30 hours by simply roster yourself for 2 or 3 days or doing half days?

This is the deciding factor to me.

If I'm told, "forget about it, you're gonna work your fingers to the bone, 50 per no half measures", then pharmacy is off the table.
You can’t offer the same as a ‘uni-trained physio’. And you certainly can’t offer ‘more’.

In other words, unless you are registered with Coru you are not a physiotherapist.
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21-06-2020, 15:54   #23
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I'm hanging in the balance as to choice of physiotherapy or pharmacy as career path.
"Torn", you could say.

Yes I've contact faculty directors and basically been given green light for admission application to either.

My concern regarding pharmacy is,
1) 5 year program vs 3 year physio
2) And this is the main one - (I realize I had another thread on this recently but didn't get sufficient clarity before it was locked) - working hours;

As a pharmacist, is it actually necessary to work 5 days typical 8 to 9 hour day (sometimes 10, depending I assume)?
Can you simply roster yourself to do 2 or 3 days?

See my lifestyle is not expensive. I just need money for the basics.
Hell I try to stay green so don't even use a car.
Costs are low, and priority is do muh job, not let muh job do me.

Feedback I got in the other thread was, community pharmacy is taxing, long hours, stressful - not the easy life.

Is there any way to make it the easy life?

Just schedule hours so you don't have to do as much, albeit for a smaller paycheck?

Or is it more so, if your contracted to a position, expect to do the 40 to 50 hour work week, no exceptions.


As always, your feedback is profoundly appreciated.
Get the qualification for whichever job you feel you would be happiest in.

Once you’re qualified there are a large range of options available for both professions. As always it depends on your circumstance and your employer.

If you work in the public sector, then you could work part-time or job share, or work on short term contracts or work half clinical or half academic or all sorts or ways.

Private practice for a physio is hard - it necessarily the physio bit (it’s always hard treating patients and always improving) but hard from a business perspective. Small business is always tough.

If you work in boots or other large chain, I’m sure there are always options for locum positions where you can move about, or else part time hours.

For my two cents, more money in pharmacy. More career options in pharmacy - management, corporate, clinical progression, pharma and industry.
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21-06-2020, 16:59   #24
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If you work in a rural village then you most certainly can be contracted part time by the pharmacist who owns it, like I said I know someone who does as it suits her lifestyle and situation. Add to that you won't be rushed off your feet.
My physio on the other hand charges €20/45 min and is out the door. He loves it and has a loyal client base that travel fairly far to him. He could easily do 30 hours a week and charge more.
20 euro per 45 minutes?

A masseuse makes more than that (significantly more) - albeit I know no masseuse with clients, "out the door".

This part where ya'll are claiming private practice physio is difficult?

I'm not getting my head around this cause, I've yet to go to a private practice locally where there's not at least a week waiting list.


So far the argument for pharmacy feels more convincing, I gotta be honest.

Part time possible, bigger money for less work.

In terms of the intensity of a pharmacy degree, can anyone shed some more light on that?

I assume 1st year is breezy enough, intensity amps up, say 3rd/4th and MPharm years.... can you get away with a 9 to 5 all in?
As in, lectures, labs, tutorials and study?
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21-06-2020, 17:04   #25
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You can’t offer the same as a ‘uni-trained physio’. And you certainly can’t offer ‘more’.

In other words, unless you are registered with Coru you are not a physiotherapist.
I'm talking specifically hands on modalities, which are extremely limited in physio, as a degree is primarily rehab based.

They cover mulligan concept mobilizations, I assume some massage work, then like every other hands on therapist they do a needling course, probably taping and strapping, some probably use a electrotherapy/tens-machine etc - and exercise prescription (body weight only, non-weight bearing).

I do all that, plus hell I did cupping so that also, plus via a PT cert prescribe weight bearing exercise (which due to the muscle "shock" component is infinitely more valuable when done correctly).

So yes, I do offer all + more specifically in terms of hands on MSK treatment, but as said, diagnostics and anatomy/physiology knowledge doesn't hold a candle to a uni trained physio.
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21-06-2020, 17:09   #26
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In terms of the intensity of a pharmacy degree, can anyone shed some more light on that?

I assume 1st year is breezy enough, intensity amps up, say 3rd/4th and MPharm years.... can you get away with a 9 to 5 all in?
As in, lectures, labs, tutorials and study?[/quote]
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21-06-2020, 17:17   #27
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20 euro per 45 minutes?

A masseuse makes more than that (significantly more) - albeit I know no masseuse with clients, "out the door".

This part where ya'll are claiming private practice physio is difficult?

I'm not getting my head around this cause, I've yet to go to a private practice locally where there's not at least a week waiting list.


So far the argument for pharmacy feels more convincing, I gotta be honest.

Part time possible, bigger money for less work.

In terms of the intensity of a pharmacy degree, can anyone shed some more light on that?

I assume 1st year is breezy enough, intensity amps up, say 3rd/4th and MPharm years.... can you get away with a 9 to 5 all in?
As in, lectures, labs, tutorials and study?
Well thats if you've been referred by a long time patient don't know what he charges randos.
Its actually really hard get an appointment with him, between recurring patients and referrals from GP's he's constantly busy. He loves what he does and works mad hours because he wants to, I could see him easily quarter his work load and raise prices make the same amount.

From the few girls I know that have done it, it can be fairly work intensive though like everything if you like it and have an aptitude its relatively grand. If you don't particularly like anatomy, biology or chemistry you'll be miserable during related modules.
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21-06-2020, 17:17   #28
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In terms of the intensity of a pharmacy degree, it might depend on the university, but first year pharmacy (when I started in 2006 in UCC) was no breeze. 9-5 pretty much just covered attending lectures and labs. Evenings and weekends were for study. It was pretty intense and demanding the whole way through. You also have to be prepared for lifelong learning; practices and therapeutics are constantly evolving, but this could be similar for physios I'd imagine too.

In saying this, it is a worthwhile career is generally well respected in Ireland and presents opportunities beyond community pharmacy. I spent several years in community before transitioning into a clinical/regulatory role and I still have the option of locuming the odd day if I choose to.

I've never been out of work in my 10 years of practice and it offers the opportunity to travel and come straight back into locum work while you need to get back earning (and least it has up to now anyway).
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21-06-2020, 17:32   #29
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Couldn't tell ya on the hours but college time tables are generally awful, I could go in Mon- Wed and be done for the week with the rest of the time for study and assignments.
You may be in for an hour one day, all day the next who knows. You could email the colleges say you're interested would it be possible to see a timetable.
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21-06-2020, 18:15   #30
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I'm talking specifically hands on modalities, which are extremely limited in physio, as a degree is primarily rehab based.

They cover mulligan concept mobilizations, I assume some massage work, then like every other hands on therapist they do a needling course, probably taping and strapping, some probably use a electrotherapy/tens-machine etc - and exercise prescription (body weight only, non-weight bearing).

I do all that, plus hell I did cupping so that also, plus via a PT cert prescribe weight bearing exercise (which due to the muscle "shock" component is infinitely more valuable when done correctly).

So yes, I do offer all + more specifically in terms of hands on MSK treatment, but as said, diagnostics and anatomy/physiology knowledge doesn't hold a candle to a uni trained physio.
Stop taking about what you don’t know. Chartered physiotherapists do not have ‘extremely limited’ hands on skills. That’s a ridiculous and stupid statement all in one. We practice evidence-based treatment. Not like the quacks who do a weekend course and all of a sudden guess what every patient gets for treatment on Monday morning.

Look back on what you said - ‘I cant hold a candle to physios’ on anatomy etc. You’ve just said that you have limited knowledge of anatomy and physiology yet for some reason can apply treatments based on anatomy and physiology to patients.
If you can’t diagnose a patient how can you treat them.
If you aren’t a ‘uni-based physio’ (in fact you’re not a physio at all as you’re not Coru registered) how do you know what the course syllabus.


What muscle ‘shock’ component? Cupping?
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