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11-04-2019, 10:17   #76
The Enbalmer
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Originally Posted by nthclare View Post
Another ugly building on Ireland's skyline, glass and metal and some concrete the usual pattern of leaving cert standard design here in Ireland.

We must have the most uncreative architects on the planet.

That thing looks ghastly....

Do you know of any better construction materials for a tall building?


Wattle and daub or drystone? Maybe a turf building like they have in Clare?
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11-04-2019, 10:19   #77
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The historic resistance to high rise buildings in Dublin at the 'expense of the Dublin skyline' needs to thrown out at this stage as far as Im concerned. Every other developed capital city has long since embraced building upwards in an attempt to combat lack of innercity space. However, My only worry would be from a fire safety standpoint.

In March of 2018 there was a fire in the Metro Hotel in Ballymun, a building which is a mere 16 storeys tall. At the time Dublin fire brigade said their 2 turntable ladders (stored in Tara Street Fire station) were unable to reach the uppermost part of the building. So this highlights the total lack of fire safety capability by Dublin fire brigade as things currently stand. To build an even taller building in the absence of suitable firefighting equipment would be negligent in the extreme. Quite frankly no planning permission should be granted for any buildings taller than the scope of the tallest turn table ladder owned by Dublin fire Brigade.
Is there a turntable ladder that can reach the top of the Burj Khalifa?
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11-04-2019, 10:25   #78
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Is there a turntable ladder that can reach the top of the Burj Khalifa?
lol

imagine waiting for the daredevil firefighter to climb up there

and not get blown clean off
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11-04-2019, 10:43   #79
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Everyone thinks high rise will solve Dublins housing problems. I'm not against high rise but its not economical to build high rise apartments. High rise means offices, hotels and penthouses.

This won't be high rise apartments. This is office space, a bar & a hotel.
Depends on the definition of high rise. 10-15 storey apartment blocks are indeed economical, they are common in cities with much lower property values than Dublin. But in Ireland people call 10-15 floor buildings sky scrappers.
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11-04-2019, 10:45   #80
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Promoting Cork, Limerick, Waterford, Athlone, Galway, and any number of other places for business and industry to set up or relocate is the only way for Dublin.
Tried that and are still trying that. Ireland is a small city state though.

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Dublin is full. Plenty of room in the rest of the country.
If you think Dublin is 'full' I'd suggest you avoid a trip to Tokyo, or even Barcelona for that matter.
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11-04-2019, 10:51   #81
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Depends on the definition of high rise. 10-15 storey apartment blocks are indeed economical, they are common in cities with much lower property values than Dublin. But in Ireland people call 10-15 floor buildings sky scrappers.
That's not high rise. Not even for Dublin but you are correct. I think 15 or 16 stores is the limit for apparents to make money. Anything over that it's office & hotels
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11-04-2019, 12:04   #82
SuperS54
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That's not high rise. Not even for Dublin but you are correct. I think 15 or 16 stores is the limit for apparents to make money. Anything over that it's office & hotels
I live in a 36 floor building that is exclusively apartments, in a complex with 8 or so of these for a total of 960 apartments. Not in Ireland obviously but it's not unusual in many countries and they are certainly profitable for developers.
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11-04-2019, 12:07   #83
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“That's not high rise. Not even for Dublin but you are correct. I think 15 or 16 stores is the limit for apparents to make money. Anything over that it's office & hotels” lol! Explain capital dock. Explain multiple uk cities building residential blocks double the 15/16 floor height with land and rent costs way below Dublin .. .
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11-04-2019, 12:35   #84
AlmightyCushion
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That's not high rise. Not even for Dublin but you are correct. I think 15 or 16 stores is the limit for apparents to make money. Anything over that it's office & hotels
Even if this was true (I'm not saying it isn't as I don't know but others are), going higher density for hotels and office space frees up more land that can be used for residential. You can split the same office space across 2 15 story towers or a single 30 story tower. If you do the latter then the other land can be used for residential.

Going higher density for office space and hotels in a city will reduce the amount of land used for all that office space and hotels which frees it up for other uses including residential.
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11-04-2019, 13:20   #85
Sleeper12
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Originally Posted by AlmightyCushion View Post
Even if this was true (I'm not saying it isn't as I don't know but others are), going higher density for hotels and office space frees up more land that can be used for residential. You can split the same office space across 2 15 story towers or a single 30 story tower. If you do the latter then the other land can be used for residential.

Going higher density for office space and hotels in a city will reduce the amount of land used for all that office space and hotels which frees it up for other uses including residential.



Pat Kenny had on an architect or developer about high rise in Ireland a few months ago. He was very much in favor of going higher in Dublin but he stressed that they won't be apartments as they don't fetch anywhere as high a rate per square footage as apartments & hotels. He said going higher is more expensive & not cheaper as many people believe. He did say that the top floor of any of these developments could be penthouse apartments as the penthouse would fetch a high value


I agree, any development is good. I don't have a problem with high rise in the right area
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11-04-2019, 13:20   #86
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On a related note, Poolbeg West SDZ was granted today:

https://www.rte.ie/news/dublin/2019/...olbeg-housing/

slightly dissappointing on the height side of things with only one 16 storey block included. I think we can all agree 15 floors of residential is certainly doable in Dublin, Capital dock being 22, but with only luxury units may be an outlier for a while.
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11-04-2019, 13:59   #87
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cgcsb, in the original plan it was one sixteen floor, take a look at the below. a few taller blocks. Of course the place is littered with 4/5 floor blocks, what a disgrace!

https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showp...&postcount=264
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11-04-2019, 14:03   #88
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Building up is ok, in the right areas, but the designs should be appropriately avant-garde, modenist, unassuming etc. as needed, and not just hideous, innane monuments to greed and mediocrity. We are in a unique position of not having yet built a ton of skyscrapers in our cities so let's be innovative and thoughtful about what we're doing. The alternative is a bunch of philistine cowboys destroying our skylines.

Not a skyscraper, but that new O'Callaghan's Properties office block on the docks in cork looks like some cheapo pride-of-the-city vanity project you'd expect to have seen in kosovo in the early 90s.
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11-04-2019, 14:10   #89
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cgcsb, in the original plan it was one sixteen floor, take a look at the below. a few taller blocks. Of course the place is littered with 4/5 floor blocks, what a disgrace!

https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showp...&postcount=264
Ah, I see, 4*18 floors, 2*16 floors and 1*20 floors. Not Ideal, but look I'll take it, this is Ireland and it's progress, now just build already.

We need 10 more of these schemes of the same ore greater density in the inner suburbs, Dublin Industrial Estate and JFK Industrial estate I'm looking at you, and a number of smaller sites near good transport. And that'll just about match the anticipated population growth without even applying downward pressure on prices.

Edit:

If we get 10,000 living in the 0.34km2 site, that's equivalent to almost 30,000 per km2. Making it the most densely populated part of the state. By comparison the Eixample of Barcelona is about 36,000 per km2, and that was built in the pre globalisation days, finished in about the year 1910.

Last edited by cgcsb; 11-04-2019 at 14:23.
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11-04-2019, 14:17   #90
Idbatterim
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Ah, I see, 4*18 floors, 2*16 floors and 1*20 floors. Not Ideal, but look I'll take it, this is Ireland and it's progress, now just build already.

We need 10 more of these schemes of the same ore greater density in the inner suburbs, Dublin Industrial Estate and JFK Industrial estate I'm looking at you, and a number of smaller sites near good transport. And that'll just about match the anticipated population growth without even applying downward pressure on prices.
no i hope the site rots before that joke proposal gets built. Ronan challenged them and got his "tower" Their are new height guidelines now, I hope a new scheme gets applied for. Double the heights and its still a mid rise scheme for the most part... There are a few last totally prime sites, when they are gone, they are gone and they are close to being absolutely WASTED!
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