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18-02-2021, 08:59   #31
Gruffalux
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Originally Posted by ednwireland View Post
largest metal vessel found on antiquity. 1.63m high
vix burgundy
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vix_Grave

Wow, same heights as me

I saw this lady with a horn yesterday ....



Woman holding a bison horn, from Laussel, France, ca. 25,000-20,000 BC (!!) Painted limestone, 1’ 6"" high.

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part of frieze of four female figures which adorned the back wall of a rockshelter. Further engravings of vulva were also discovered on rocks within the archaeological deposits. The woman holding a bison horn is pregnant and the shape of her waist and hips suggest that she had already had children. Her head is turned to the right but seems to look down at her breast rather than towards the horn. She has no face but her neck and shoulders are well defined. Her large breasts are placed high and again suggest previous child bearing. The sexual triangle is well defined and her legs, sculpted slightly apart, are complete and in proportion to the length of her body. The fingers on her left hand rest on her stomach whereas her right arm bends upwards supporting a bison horn marked with 14 vertical incisions. Traces of red ochre occur on her head, body, hips and stomach.
http://www.bradshawfoundation.com/sculpture/laussel.php

I wonder did she say to her sculptor afterwards that he could have done a little photoshop on the hips - they are rather lumpy-looking! Not exactly the smoothly curvaceous bottoms of the ancient carved Maltese ladies.

Here is one of my favourite artefacts ever - I saw it in person and she is gorgeous and peaceful. 3000 ish BC. Quite small at 12 cm long. Found in the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum - a mind-blower of a place. I was a bit spooked down there, himself was high as a kite

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18-02-2021, 09:06   #32
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If it was 6 thousand years then these would be concurrent with farming here. It's 9,000, so this is around the time of the first people arriving in Ireland.
They were farming much earlier than us in the Fertile Crescent.

Though yesterday I read somewhere (I cannot find now of course!) that organised settlements were much earlier than agriculture anyway. The picture is always changing
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24-02-2021, 11:04   #33
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i may be bending the rules slightly with this:

https://twitter.com/gillianmobrien/s...23325669494791
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24-02-2021, 11:16   #34
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The Lycurgus cup

Rome 4th century AD. It is the only complete example of a very special type of glass, known as dichroic, which changes colour when held up to the light. The opaque green cup turns to a glowing translucent red when light is shone through it.


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24-02-2021, 11:34   #35
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i may be bending the rules slightly with this:

https://twitter.com/gillianmobrien/s...23325669494791
I would so definitely like a pair of those.
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25-02-2021, 09:37   #36
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Those ancients and their enviable swag..

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Hot-water bottles in the shape of human body parts for therapeutic purposes. From Paphos, Cyprus, 1st c. BC - 1st c. AD.
These clay vessels were filled with hot liquids (water or oil), and applied to the aching parts of the body in order to relieve pain.




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27-02-2021, 13:19   #37
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I don't know if the Archaeology forum is known for breaking fast happening news, but here goes. Ceremonial carriage unearthed at Pompeii. And, goodness me, but it looks from the decorations that people where having rather jolly good times.





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Archaeologists have unearthed a unique ancient-Roman ceremonial carriage from a villa just outside Pompeii, the city buried in a volcanic eruption in 79 AD.

The almost perfectly preserved four-wheeled carriage made of iron, bronze and tin was found near the stables of an ancient villa at Civita Giuliana, around 700 metres (yards) north of the walls of ancient Pompeii.

Massimo Osanna, the outgoing director of the Pompeii archaeological site, said the carriage was the first of its kind discovered in the area, which had so far yielded functional vehicles used for transport and work, but not for ceremonies.

"This is an extraordinary discovery that advances our understanding of the ancient world," Osanna said, adding that the carriage would have "accompanied festive moments for the community, (such as) parades and processions".
https://www.journalpioneer.com/news/...ompeii-557618/



The full dig described - https://www.journalpioneer.com/news/...ompeii-557618/
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27-02-2021, 13:56   #38
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Those ancients and their enviable swag..







I'm pretty sure they're Apple Airpods.
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