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04-12-2019, 13:22   #61
Dav010
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Originally Posted by AK_47 View Post
But why would landlords prefer to use AirB&B and pay 52% of tax and constantly deal with brand new short term guests rather than have one stable tenant who pays the bills and rent? If they are scared of the Part 4 tenants who after 6 months get more rights, then offer your place for 5 months only or secure yourself with 1 year lease.
Airbnb guests usually leave on Sunday morning, and payment is guaranteed, in advance. Also hosts apply a cleaning charge (€70 in my case) for the “hassle” of cleaning afterwards, that takes care of linen/cleaning costs.
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04-12-2019, 14:08   #62
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But why would landlords prefer to use AirB&B and pay 52% of tax and constantly deal with brand new short term guests rather than have one stable tenant who pays the bills and rent? If they are scared of the Part 4 tenants who after 6 months get more rights, then offer your place for 5 months only or secure yourself with 1 year lease.
The tax rate is the same on Airbnb and long term rental but you can charge a lot more for Airbnb with none of the risks. It’s also not that much work you just have cleaners etc to do the upkeep up and bookings etc are all through Airbnb.
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04-12-2019, 14:17   #63
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If we stop people coming to Dublin (which is where most would be located due to the location of the employment and the desire for access to facilities) where do they go.

You do realise we are a small open economy who needs FDI. These would be high earning individuals paying income tax and spending in the economy. This self same tax that would be used to fund house building (be it social or affordable etc).

Who do you expect to pay for the social and affordable housing ? is it the working middle income who are above assistance for state support but below what they need to get a mortgage?

I am curious as to who you see funding this?
Who was paying for it before, when it was built by the local authorities?

TBH I don't really care. We are just copying London and Berlin and duplicating all the mistakes along the way.

At some point it will become unsustainable either for the companies or the workers. Until that happens though nothing will change. Don't this to be fixed by the Govt.
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04-12-2019, 14:56   #64
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Who was paying for it before, when it was built by the local authorities?

TBH I don't really care. We are just copying London and Berlin and duplicating all the mistakes along the way.

At some point it will become unsustainable either for the companies or the workers. Until that happens though nothing will change. Don't this to be fixed by the Govt.
Okay so you don't really care who pays, we have the youngest population in Europe where other countries are also having the same issues with housing.

Everybody wants to live in or around Dublin or within a reasonable commutable distance but nobody wants high rise apartment blocks nor does anybody want social housing estates next to them.

So what do you suggest, no matter what you do you are not going to satisfy everybody, so how do you decide who you satisfy?

We have this mindset that we have to satisfy everybody when in reality we satisfy nobody.
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04-12-2019, 15:10   #65
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Stop worrying about other people and do what works for oneself.
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04-12-2019, 19:30   #66
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I would prefer AirB&B over long term leasing. The risks of leasing your own property are much higher
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04-12-2019, 19:39   #67
The Student
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Stop worrying about other people and do what works for oneself.
So do you have an answer to my question. Who is going to pay for all the new social and affordable properties?
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04-12-2019, 20:04   #68
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Do you have answer for mine? Who paid for it when it was built by the local authorities?
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06-12-2019, 01:33   #69
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If we stop people coming to Dublin (which is where most would be located due to the location of the employment and the desire for access to facilities) where do they go.

You do realise we are a small open economy who needs FDI. These would be high earning individuals paying income tax and spending in the economy. This self same tax that would be used to fund house building (be it social or affordable etc).

Who do you expect to pay for the social and affordable housing ? is it the working middle income who are above assistance for state support but below what they need to get a mortgage?

I am curious as to who you see funding this?
The economy is booming and expected to continue to grow significantly. This money should be used to get fibre broadband around the country, greatly enhance transport links between major cities and encourage apartment building outside of Dublin. With these measures being implemented, then promote the rest of the country for companies to consider.

We are a small country with other major cities not being far from Dublin. It takes two to three hours to drive to Galway, Limerick and Cork from Dublin. With a high speed train network that could almost be commutable. At worst, it would be an easy trip to do for a weekend or even a day trip, so people wouldn't feel they're missing out on all the fun in Dublin.

The main promotion would be lower rent for employees which also means employers can pay them less. Also, being able to live closer to work gives more time to employees from not having to commute.
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06-12-2019, 08:02   #70
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Do you have answer for mine? Who paid for it when it was built by the local authorities?
You are comparing apples to oranges. For example, what other demands were on the public finances then compared to now. The health area comes to mind . There was much less on a demand on infrastructure compared to now . There was little on no money put into water supply infrastructure compared to now - and we are now ‘paying ‘for it, etc, etc
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07-02-2020, 14:38   #71
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IMHO, its relating to the following issues:

1) Everyone wants somewhere to live, so changes in price does not decrease demand very much.

2) Government policy is reducing the supply of rental property. Rent controls and increasing regulation means the number of landlords and the number of rental properties is falling, even though rents are increasing.

3) Government policy refuses to address the difficulties in evicting non-paying, overholding or anti-social tenants. This increases the financial risk of being a landlord and that makes the prices charged more expensive.

4) Supply of property is not the same thing as supply of rental property. Much of the additional supply is going towards buy-to-own buyers. Not everyone can (or even wants to) buy-to-own. While the price of property to buy is stable, property to rent is still undersupplied relative to demand because of 2 and 3.

5) There are more votes in keeping the cost of buy-to-own property down, than addressing problems in the rental market. There is no political will to help, because making landlording attractive will mean more competition for buy-to-own buyers from landlord investors.
If I may add to this list of reasons:

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Figures show that around 13,500 first residence permits were issued to students entering higher education in Ireland from non-European Economic Area (EEA) countries in 2017 – a 45% increase on the same figure from 2013.
That's just non EEA countries, never mind anyone else that comes to work. Now, I'm not against peopl coming to Irleland at all, my OH is actually from a non EEA country - it's the volume. However, Ireland or more specifically Dublin is not equipment for such an increase of people. We are competting with that extra 7 or 8 thousand students for rental accommodation. That's insane.

Nobody really wants to talk about that though. Why can't Ireland restrict the amount of student Visas so it frees up some rental properties otherwise taken up by English-learning students?

Source of my quote:
Number of non-EEA students in Ireland reaches record level: here's where they're coming from
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07-02-2020, 14:53   #72
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I

Nobody really wants to talk about that though. Why can't Ireland restrict the amount of student Visas so it frees up some rental properties otherwise taken up by English-learning students?
Non EU students pay massive fees, Universities massively benefit from then (and that knocks on to benefitting the country in general) so turning away their money would not be wise.
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07-02-2020, 16:30   #73
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I think is greed. Also short term contracts and unfurnished properties on the rise on daft. Is absolutely out of control.
Unfurnished property is the norm outside of ireland. Greed is always thrown around about landlords. What does it mean ? Is it greed that revenue get most of the rent, is it greed the repair man charges higher rates in Dublin , is it greed to expect the rent to be paid. It's just one of those words that means nothing but is thrown out about landlords because it's easy, emotive and generally a public pleasing word.

Last edited by handlemaster; 08-02-2020 at 10:50.
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08-02-2020, 10:48   #74
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Unfurnished property is the norm outside of ireland. Greed is always thrown around about landlords. What does it mean ? Is it greed that revenue get most of the rent, is it greed the repair man charges higher rates in Dublin , is it greed to expect the rent to be paid. It's just one of those words that means nothing but is thrown out about landlords because it's easy, emotive and general a public pleasing word.

Perfectly said
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08-02-2020, 10:59   #75
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How many of the dopes who were protesting for immigration a few years back are still renting in Dublin.
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