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10-06-2021, 18:29   #16
py2006
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On a serious note, men's mental health does NOT get talked about a lot. We are starting to hear more about it lately alright.
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10-06-2021, 18:36   #17
El_Duderino 09
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On a serious note, men's mental health does NOT get talked about a lot. We are starting to hear more about it lately alright.
Funny thing is that people might agree that men's mental health is important and ought to be talked about as a serious aspect of men's health, but they will also scorne any man with a public profile who actually cares enough to talk about it publicly.
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10-06-2021, 18:44   #18
Thelonious Monk
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Funny thing is that people might agree that men's mental health is important and ought to be talked about as a serious aspect of men's health, but they will also scorne any man with a public profile who actually cares enough to talk about it publicly.
I don't know it seems like lots of famous men have mental health issues now and are lauded for it, Prince Harry etc.
Also "Mental Health" is now used by people who are inconvenienced somewhat, we saw a lot of it during covid - my mental health is suffering because I can't play golf, go to the pub, or go to the beach, that one seemed to be a popular one around these parts.
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10-06-2021, 19:30   #19
Yurt!
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Funny thing is that people might agree that men's mental health is important and ought to be talked about as a serious aspect of men's health, but they will also scorne any man with a public profile who actually cares enough to talk about it publicly.

I found Alastair Campbell's (Tony Blair spin doctor) BBC documentary about his life-long battle with depression quite moving. Very humanizing because he came across as a complete thunderc*nt in his career and the worst type of grubby political operative - though his openness about his depression filled in the blanks a lot as to why he was the way he was.
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10-06-2021, 19:35   #20
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I found Alastair Campbell's (Tony Blair spin doctor) BBC documentary about his life-long battle with depression quite moving. Very humanizing because he came across as a complete thunderc*nt in his career and the worst type of grubby political operative - though his openness about his depression filled in the blanks a lot as to why he was the way he was.
John prescott had the eating disorder bulimia afaik
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10-06-2021, 19:39   #21
Yurt!
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John prescott had the eating disorder bulimia afaik

He also had a mean left short jab!
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10-06-2021, 20:45   #22
Strumms
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Funny thing is that people might agree that men's mental health is important and ought to be talked about as a serious aspect of men's health, but they will also scorne any man with a public profile who actually cares enough to talk about it publicly.
The problem too is that there is a cohort that now see mental health, it’s growing importance in society and use it to excuse poor decisions and behaviors...

Somebody robs a car... “ well sorry but I haven’t been feeling myself *sad face * I’m very sorry I wrecked their Ford “

“ ok, you go home and look after yourself and be good, probation act “

Victims up an hour earlier to go to work, school etc on public transport, their mental health is never considered.
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10-06-2021, 20:59   #23
MikeOxsgreen
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Like I just realised how easy women have it.. for the first time in my life I have an appointment for d barbers...yes I don't have to wait. All I have to do is turn up at a given time..no looking in d door and seeing 4 big heads a hair fellas waiting and me saying ahhh I'll be back later and heading round to Lidl or sumtin.. The luxury of it.
I hope members might learn from my woes and rash decision.

The day barbers opened after the lock down, beng a bit dishevelled , in traffic I passed by two barbers.
One had a queue, one with none. I rang the one with no queue and was told "sure drop in".
So I did.

Big mistake.
Boy did my mental health suffer.
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10-06-2021, 23:52   #24
ILoveYourVibes
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Like we Just don't like Jibba-jabberin so leave us alone. .

Some of you seem to enjoy it a lot on here.

Im kidding.

Spoiler: prove me wrong though
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11-06-2021, 00:47   #25
Sam Quentin
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On a serious note, men's mental health does NOT get talked about a lot. We are starting to hear more about it lately alright.
This is a serious note/post.. just didn't want to be lambasted for my honesty!? The words mental health, depression etc are being used much to willy-nilly and at the drop of a hat lately, especially about us MEN.. C'mon guys admit it anyone at all who has the confidence or stage to talk about anything 'private' is calling themselves depressed presently or in the past.. my biggest gripe is with 'heavy' drinkers blaming depression or some mental illnes,.. we're all bloody depressed then but only drunks drink about it!?
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11-06-2021, 01:04   #26
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On a serious note, men's mental health does NOT get talked about a lot. We are starting to hear more about it lately alright.
This would be along my lines of thinking, especially when someone in the public eye speaks openly about it. And IMO the reason it gets so much attention is to let fellas know it is ok to talk about it
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11-06-2021, 07:12   #27
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Also "Mental Health" is now used by people who are inconvenienced somewhat, we saw a lot of it during covid - my mental health is suffering because I can't play golf, go to the pub, or go to the beach, that one seemed to be a popular one around these parts.
This. It can be increasingly difficult to tease out those like the aforementioned Alastair Campbell's genuine struggles and those quite simply having a whinge, often, if not usually for attention, or simply to fit in. This goes triple for "celebrities".
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11-06-2021, 11:27   #28
El_Duderino 09
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This. It can be increasingly difficult to tease out those like the aforementioned Alastair Campbell's genuine struggles and those quite simply having a whinge, often, if not usually for attention, or simply to fit in. This goes triple for "celebrities".
Yeah but how do you, personally, tell the difference between the two? Why is it your job to distinguish between them?

I think it's always hard to tell the difference between mild and acute, particularly when you've only experienced one and not the other. Take migraines as an example. My dad, sister and wife suffer/ed with migraines occasionally. If you've ever seen someone with a migraine then you'll know it's nothing like a headache. But when you describe a migraine it can sound a lot like a headache in so far as the primary symptom of both is a pain in the head. Someone who has a bad headache might think they have a migraine but they don't.

A friend was having a genuine relationship drama and we were chatting with him about it. One of the lads (a bit younger and at the stage of life where he was more interested in playing the field than having a girlfriend) said he totally understood. He went on to explain his own situation which boiled down to having a fcuk-buddy arrangement with 2 women who were friends, one of whom had feeling for him and he didn't want her to be cross that he was banging her friend too...

What I took from that situation was that I envied his naivety at thinking his situation was comparable to the other guy who was involved in a marriage breakup. Likewise, I really hope i never experience an actual migraine, and I hope the blokes who are feeling a bit down and call it depression, never experience a full on bout of depression or any other mental illness. But i don't think it's my job to discern the degree to which a bloke (celebrity or not) on the radio is experiencing a diagnosable bout of mental illness or just feeling a bit down - there are professionals to do that.
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11-06-2021, 12:16   #29
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A lot of the milder mental health issues like being depressed, listless, low self esteem etc. are largely down to framing how you see the world. There was someone coined a phrase "basket case theory" with the basic premise that people view most strangers as being perfect examples of people that have their sh1t together yet if they actually got to know them very well their flaws would be exposed and they would just be as crazy as they think they are themselves

Another angle to framing is sorta assuming everyone is better /more skilled etc. yet statistically everyone on the planet has 0% skills, take someone like Tiger Woods, best golfer in the world but most people here are better drivers and for men better husbands. I think a basic strategy in life is having some things however small that you have control over, so it could be things like diet, fitness, how you dress even.
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11-06-2021, 12:28   #30
El_Duderino 09
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A lot of the milder mental health issues like being depressed, listless, low self esteem etc. are largely down to framing how you see the world. There was someone coined a phrase "basket case theory" with the basic premise that people view most strangers as being perfect examples of people that have their sh1t together yet if they actually got to know them very well their flaws would be exposed and they would just be as crazy as they think they are themselves

Another angle to framing is sorta assuming everyone is better /more skilled etc. yet statistically everyone on the planet has 0% skills, take someone like Tiger Woods, best golfer in the world but most people here are better drivers and for men better husbands. I think a basic strategy in life is having some things however small that you have control over, so it could be things like diet, fitness, how you dress even.
Classing depression as "milder mental health issue" kinda sums up why there should be more, good quality, open discussion of mental health/ill health.
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