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26-04-2018, 15:26   #16
Boardnashea
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The hen run mentioned above has been bare earth for the past few months. I can't wait for it to start greening up again as the weather warms up again. It is divided in two so am keeping them out of one side to give it a start. Just got to control the nettles and other undesirables.
Three goslings hatched over the past couple of days which are lovely. One more egg being kept warm so fingers crossed.
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27-04-2018, 04:13   #17
realitykeeper
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Recently I was in the market in Cork and I wanted to buy raw cheese (i.e. made from unpasteurized milk). I found it but a lot of it seems to be sourced from abroad. An obvious solution to low milk prices is to use your milk to make raw cheese.

Another obvious solution is to get out of dairy. Most Irish vegetables have to be imported. Whatever reasons may exist to explain why Irish farmers do dairy instead of other stuff, one cannot deny that going against the grain may stand to you in times of systemic crisis. Think of veg as gold to the contrarian. So, that is my tuppence worth.
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27-04-2018, 04:31   #18
Eamonn8448
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Alot of labour goes into veg, big overheads to get started and then the nightmare of trying to sell it , alot of ups and downs in it , those few who do stay at it are a rare breed these days and glutens for punishment :-)
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27-04-2018, 04:45   #19
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Alot of labour goes into veg, big overheads to get started and then the nightmare of trying to sell it , alot of ups and downs in it , those few who do stay at it are a rare breed these days and glutens for punishment :-)
Another way of looking at it is that dairy is great if you want an easy life. I wonder why so many farmers in Ireland want an easy life. What do they have in common?
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27-04-2018, 04:55   #20
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Ah i wouldnt say dairy is easy , far from it at times like this ( not dairy myself btw), main point about veg i was trying to make to you is trying to find a market at a fair price for it, i remember many years ago going back to another fellas yard and loading up boxed broccoli @ say 2.50 a box and then delivering to a retailer for 4.80 a box, farm i was working with had a market for it the new guy hardly broke even , veg is a very tough game at times and so too is dairy, your tied to the place 24/7 in both
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27-04-2018, 12:09   #21
Rows Grower
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Recently I was in the market in Cork and I wanted to buy raw cheese (i.e. made from unpasteurized milk). I found it but a lot of it seems to be sourced from abroad. An obvious solution to low milk prices is to use your milk to make raw cheese.

Another obvious solution is to get out of dairy.
Most Irish vegetables have to be imported. Whatever reasons may exist to explain why Irish farmers do dairy instead of other stuff, one cannot deny that going against the grain may stand to you in times of systemic crisis. Think of veg as gold to the contrarian. So, that is my tuppence worth.
I take it you have never worked on or even seen a dairy farm or cheese making farm in operation?

Either that or you must be that lad Johnny Lynch that imported the buffaloes from Italy to Kilnamartyra.
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27-04-2018, 12:16   #22
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Another way of looking at it is that dairy is great if you want an easy life. I wonder why so many farmers in Ireland want an easy life. What do they have in common?
How is being tied to a job that involves looking after a herd of cows and milking them twice a day, 365 days a year come hail, rain or high water easy?

I love the easy life, who doesn't? That's why I wouldn't take up dairy farming if you gave me the land and the cows for nothing.
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27-04-2018, 20:47   #23
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I take it you have never worked on or even seen a dairy farm or cheese making farm in operation?

Either that or you must be that lad Johnny Lynch that imported the buffaloes from Italy to Kilnamartyra.
Wrong on both points.
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27-04-2018, 21:08   #24
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Wrong on both points.
To be honest I was fairly confident you weren't Johnny Lynch.

Would you be willing to share your experience of the other point?
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27-04-2018, 21:16   #25
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How is being tied to a job that involves looking after a herd of cows and milking them twice a day, 365 days a year come hail, rain or high water easy?

I love the easy life, who doesn't? That's why I wouldn't take up dairy farming if you gave me the land and the cows for nothing.
My concern is to do with food security for Ireland. Relying on imports for veg is unwise given that international trade is subject to market forces which can sometimes change suddenly. Needless to say I am expecting this to happen otherwise I would not be concerned. How soon? Too soon.
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27-04-2018, 22:29   #26
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My concern is to do with food security for Ireland. Relying on imports for veg is unwise given that international trade is subject to market forces which can sometimes change suddenly. Needless to say I am expecting this to happen otherwise I would not be concerned. How soon? Too soon.
How prepared are you?
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28-04-2018, 06:55   #27
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My concern is to do with food security for Ireland. Relying on imports for veg is unwise given that international trade is subject to market forces which can sometimes change suddenly. Needless to say I am expecting this to happen otherwise I would not be concerned. How soon? Too soon.
You quoted my post but managed to totally ignore it at the same time.

I'll give you an easier question, how much per kg was the cheese you purchased?
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28-04-2018, 06:56   #28
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How prepared are you?
He's got a block of cheese.
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28-04-2018, 20:06   #29
Buford T. Justice VI
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Recently I was in the market in Cork and I wanted to buy raw cheese (i.e. made from unpasteurized milk). I found it but a lot of it seems to be sourced from abroad. An obvious solution to low milk prices is to use your milk to make raw cheese.
Making it is the easy bit, after spending a significant sum to buy and set up the equipment. Waiting for the cheese to mature is going to cost hugely in terms of cash flow, the longer the maturing process needed, the bigger the hit on cash flow. Then there is the whole seeking out markets, which in itself is time consuming when done alongside the day to day management of running a farm and the not insignificant time needed to make and process the cheese. And the obvious necessity to actually sell the cheese to try to recoup some of the money already spent with years in getting to that stage.
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Another obvious solution is to get out of dairy. Most Irish vegetables have to be imported. Whatever reasons may exist to explain why Irish farmers do dairy instead of other stuff, one cannot deny that going against the grain may stand to you in times of systemic crisis. Think of veg as gold to the contrarian. So, that is my tuppence worth.
Dairy has traditionally been carried out on poorer land where it was necessary to have as many sources of income as possible to allow bills to be paid. The better land was traditionally in beef and tillage as it would still be possible to derive an income even in poor weather which isn't always possible in poorer years.

So the land already in dairy would be poorer land which wouldn't be possible to convert to tillage in any meaningful way.

The old saying, 'We can grow anything we want in Ireland, we just can't harvest it', still rings true.
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29-04-2018, 14:39   #30
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Dairy has traditionally been carried out on poorer land where it was necessary to have as many sources of income as possible to allow bills to be paid. The better land was traditionally in beef and tillage as it would still be possible to derive an income even in poor weather which isn't always possible in poorer years.
I'm not sure that's the case nationwide. The difference might be the passage of time and specialisation but in the areas I've worked dairy was on the better land with sheep or beef on less suitable ground.
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