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09-11-2019, 11:13   #46
kceire
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I would have thought being "too hung" might hinder escape
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09-11-2019, 11:21   #47
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I don't know if it has been mentioned but fire escape requirement would only have come in from 1998 so if the works were before that, an escape window is not required although very much advised.
If windows had been updated since, they must then comply.
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09-11-2019, 11:28   #48
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I bought my house, it was listed as 4 bedrooms(really only 3).

But one of the listed bedrooms was a dinning room, it had french doors connecting the living room. I knew that was the case from the listing as I was familiar with the houses.

But the majority of houses that are listed for my estate stay 4 bedrooms and they are the exact same layout.
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09-11-2019, 13:05   #49
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I don't know if it has been mentioned but fire escape requirement would only have come in from 1998 so if the works were before that, an escape window is not required although very much advised.
If windows had been updated since, they must then comply.
1991 no?

https://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/def...ire_safety.pdf
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09-11-2019, 13:07   #50
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Originally Posted by c.p.w.g.w View Post
I bought my house, it was listed as 4 bedrooms(really only 3).

But one of the listed bedrooms was a dinning room, it had french doors connecting the living room. I knew that was the case from the listing as I was familiar with the houses.

But the majority of houses that are listed for my estate stay 4 bedrooms and they are the exact same layout.
I wouldn’t class that as a bedroom myself personally. It’s part of the living space and with direct access to the living room, then it would be a nuisance.

Even if you blocked the double doors, the other door I’m guessing is into the kitchen space and not the entrance hall?
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09-11-2019, 13:47   #51
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I wouldn’t class that as a bedroom myself personally. It’s part of the living space and with direct access to the living room, then it would be a nuisance.

Even if you blocked the double doors, the other door I’m guessing is into the kitchen space and not the entrance hall?
I never considered it a bedroom, it's now part of the open plan kitchen/dinning room
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09-11-2019, 14:44   #52
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Pretty certain the requirement for escape windows for dwellings only came in for part B 1997 which took effect july 98 even though the document states January 98.
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09-11-2019, 15:21   #53
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some fire safety measures sometime go over the top, was in one office locked with keypad servers other sensitive stuff going on with paperwork, big windows facing to main street that would be way better way out if really needing fast exit. and they wanted to remove the safety lock due the fire safety regs, thou think they let it stay at the end.


as logically thinking it should be closest possible exit route - even if say window needs to be broken, as to opposite logic if theres fire in corridors etc going all the way and risking harm makes no sense.


thus why brought in attic example as even thou windows could be wide but depending on roof, and height hardly any safer trying to cling to roof, or risk going into fire, if it would happen.
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09-11-2019, 15:31   #54
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Pretty certain the requirement for escape windows for dwellings only came in for part B 1997 which took effect july 98 even though the document states January 98.
Tgd b 1991 referred to BS 5588: part 1 1990 for single dwellings.

This BS does indicate the requirement for openable windows to bedrooms.

Interestingly more akin to the current requirement, than the one from tgd b 1997
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09-11-2019, 17:40   #55
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Tgd b 1991 referred to BS 5588: part 1 1990 for single dwellings.

This BS does indicate the requirement for openable windows to bedrooms.

Interestingly more akin to the current requirement, than the one from tgd b 1997
Yes part B 1991 via BS5588 does refer to something very close to the current standard although if I remember correctly, the key lock was allowable. I've had this discussion before and for.some reason it was broadly agreed that the escape rules were not applied here until the 1997 regs came in. That has certainly been my experience to date seeing what has been installed over varying years but following the wording of the BS as quoted, it would appear that escape openings should have been provided from 1991 so my earlier comments should be discarded.
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09-11-2019, 17:53   #56
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some fire safety measures sometime go over the top, was in one office locked with keypad servers other sensitive stuff going on with paperwork, big windows facing to main street that would be way better way out if really needing fast exit. and they wanted to remove the safety lock due the fire safety regs, thou think they let it stay at the end.


as logically thinking it should be closest possible exit route - even if say window needs to be broken, as to opposite logic if theres fire in corridors etc going all the way and risking harm makes no sense.


thus why brought in attic example as even thou windows could be wide but depending on roof, and height hardly any safer trying to cling to roof, or risk going into fire, if it would happen.
Offices are treated differently again. They don’t require escape/rescue windows as the escape is designed around protected escape routes to the final exit.
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11-11-2019, 11:00   #57
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This has nothing to do with planning or regulations. It has to do with marketing. If a house is advertised as having 5 bedrooms and a viewer comes and sees one bedroom is downstairs they will be pissed off. Equally if it is advertised as 5 bedrooms a potential buyer might pass it over as they want 4 bedrooms only. I agree with the auctioneer. The way to market the house is 4 bedrooms with converted garage.
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11-11-2019, 11:04   #58
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This has nothing to do with planning or regulations. It has to do with marketing. If a house is advertised as having 5 bedrooms and a viewer comes and sees one bedroom is downstairs they will be pissed off. Equally if it is advertised as 5 bedrooms a potential buyer might pass it over as they want 4 bedrooms only. I agree with the auctioneer. The way to market the house is 4 bedrooms with converted garage.
What's wrong with a ground floor bedroom.

There are many positives for having one
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11-11-2019, 11:06   #59
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What's wrong with a ground floor bedroom.

There are many positives for having one
There is nothing wrong with it per se but from a marketing point of view it is overselling. Losing some of the potential market is not a good idea.
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11-11-2019, 12:00   #60
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There is nothing wrong with it per se but from a marketing point of view it is overselling. Losing some of the potential market is not a good idea.
How stupid do you think people are that they can't see a room can be changed to whatever they want? If someone doesn't want the 5th bedroom they can change it to something else, nobody is going to walk away because a room is called a bedroom and they want something else in its place.

Also going by your logic you are losing the market of people who want 5 bedrooms if you call it 4 bedrooms. Personally I don't think it makes any difference if its called 4 bed or 5 bed people will use the rooms the way they want to regardless. Someone might even use it as a 3 bed and convert one room to an office and another to a gym.
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