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09-11-2019, 16:00   #4201
OwlsZat
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Brexit is now largely off the table as a risk.Builders are building only where there is demand. Banks are lending prudently.High hopes of a US/China trade deal. Markets are moving out of bonds into equities signalling optimism.
Not sure on your logic the for optimism

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...premium-europe
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09-11-2019, 18:47   #4202
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New estates do look crammed. The Hansfiled development in Ongar, D15 is a typical example of that with parking space instead of front lawn and very narrow lanes to drive through.The estate is still being expanded so there must be damand, but they no longer advertise on Daft which is interesting
Yeah I know what you mean, I’m not a fan of the houses. They just don’t appeal to me. One of the uglier new build estates.


https://touch.daft.ie/dublin/new-hom...-dublin-117908
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09-11-2019, 18:54   #4203
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Had a look at Beresford and the Paddocks in Donabate today and they're both lovely developments. There's only three or four homes left in the next phase of Beresford but in terms of location they're excellent (right opposite the park and close enough to the train station).

The Paddocks are are really beautiful homes. Think I'll be trying to snatch one of the next phase up on those if I haven't found somewhere by the time the come available.

Not much garden space, but I've come to expect that for new builds these days.
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10-11-2019, 21:57   #4204
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Brexit is now largely off the table as a risk.
Builders are building only where there is demand.
Banks are lending prudently.
High hopes of a US/China trade deal.
Markets are moving out of bonds into equities signalling optimism.

The 'For sale' market certainly looks to have reached a reasonable equilibrium - the overhang of landlords looking to sell has largely cleared, prices aren't doing much up or down, stuff is selling.

The 'Rental' market is still completely screwed. I'm seeing signs of it driving workers we need out of the country (tech mostly). We need to build rental apartments, we need lots of them, and we need to build them quickly. I'm very happy if large institutional buyers own them, or a large chunk of them, let them take the macro-economic risk.
how have you come to this conclusion? we literally have no idea how brexit is going to play out never mind the subsequent economic impact it will have on ireland.
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10-11-2019, 22:52   #4205
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how have you come to this conclusion? we literally have no idea how brexit is going to play out never mind the subsequent economic impact it will have on ireland.
Brexit can be managed over the long term when there is a series of deals in place, which now looks like the most likely scenario. The biggest danger to Ireland was a sudden "no deal" exit with a significant and overnight impact on our economy.

There is a partial upside, but the influx of rich fund managers some were suggesting isn't going to happen.

Anyone who was waiting to see what happens with Brexit for its impact on Irish property prices is now going to be waiting years, if not decades to get a conclusion. It's not a major factor anymore, people can't wait that long. The risk of a sudden Brexit-induced crash has significantly reduced.
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10-11-2019, 22:53   #4206
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Its impossible to say what effect brexit will have on the irish economy,
it will be negative, but by how much,? one example it will be more expensive to export products to the uk,
there may be less demand for irish products like beer,whisky,
if the uk economy slows down.
it will probably cost more to buy for example , irish whisky in the uk
Theres too many variables involved to make a prediction,
its like trying to predict the weather on a day 8 months from now .
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10-11-2019, 22:58   #4207
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Originally Posted by Sheeps View Post
Had a look at Beresford and the Paddocks in Donabate today and they're both lovely developments. There's only three or four homes left in the next phase of Beresford but in terms of location they're excellent (right opposite the park and close enough to the train station).

The Paddocks are are really beautiful homes. Think I'll be trying to snatch one of the next phase up on those if I haven't found somewhere by the time the come available.

Not much garden space, but I've come to expect that for new builds these days.
I do wish builders could dream up more original and appropriate names for their developments. The Paddocks in Donabate, for example. Is there some horse breeding or racing activity associated with that particular area?
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10-11-2019, 23:24   #4208
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I do wish builders could dream up more original and appropriate names for their developments. The Paddocks in Donabate, for example. Is there some horse breeding or racing activity associated with that particular area?
Yeah, agreed. All the house types also seem to be named after birds.
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11-11-2019, 08:55   #4209
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Originally Posted by hmmm View Post
Brexit can be managed over the long term when there is a series of deals in place, which now looks like the most likely scenario. The biggest danger to Ireland was a sudden "no deal" exit with a significant and overnight impact on our economy.

There is a partial upside, but the influx of rich fund managers some were suggesting isn't going to happen.

Anyone who was waiting to see what happens with Brexit for its impact on Irish property prices is now going to be waiting years, if not decades to get a conclusion. It's not a major factor anymore, people can't wait that long. The risk of a sudden Brexit-induced crash has significantly reduced.
we have absolutely no idea of both the economic impact in both the short, medium or long term. Its definitely going to have a negative impact but how much is the question. So i would have to disagree with you.
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11-11-2019, 09:22   #4210
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Originally Posted by hmmm View Post
Brexit can be managed over the long term when there is a series of deals in place, which now looks like the most likely scenario. The biggest danger to Ireland was a sudden "no deal" exit with a significant and overnight impact on our economy.

There is a partial upside, but the influx of rich fund managers some were suggesting isn't going to happen.

Anyone who was waiting to see what happens with Brexit for its impact on Irish property prices is now going to be waiting years, if not decades to get a conclusion. It's not a major factor anymore, people can't wait that long. The risk of a sudden Brexit-induced crash has significantly reduced.
Seems at odds with virtually all Economists and Business orgs, in both Ireland and the UK, what info do you have that they don’t?
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11-11-2019, 09:59   #4211
Mic 1972
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Brexit may not be the biggest impact on property market then, as the market has reversed the positive trend and something must have triggered that
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11-11-2019, 10:13   #4212
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Brexit may not be the biggest impact on property market then, as the market has reversed the positive trend and something must have triggered that
what any market hates is uncertainty, the unresolved brexit issue has caused uncertainty which has certainly contributed.

the other factors are pretty obvious, the growth in prices of houses has surpassed the growth in earnings and has still as the CB rules have kicked in. In a functioning market with tight lending rules house prices should more or less rise with inflation.
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11-11-2019, 10:14   #4213
Dav010
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Brexit may not be the biggest impact on property market then, as the market has reversed the positive trend and something must have triggered that
Not something, more likely somethings. There was a call recently for the CB to relax lending rules as they are onerous on prospective buyers, many cannot get mortgages because the deposit required and/or wage multiple locks them out. The reduction in investors buying to let for reasons covered in other threads, the concern about jobs/wages as a result of Brexit in companies whose main market is the UK, the decrease in UK buyers, again due to currency value and Brexit concerns, etc etc.
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11-11-2019, 10:22   #4214
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Story from the West Of Ireland

I was talking to a very good friend of mine that is a builders supplier in the West (I want to leave it a bit vague).

He is telling me that his sales have fallen off a cliff and this is perhaps the worst year he has put down since the early 2010's.

He claims what little construction that was happening in the Western region has completely come to a halt.
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11-11-2019, 10:29   #4215
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The IMF and most major economists are warning of a global slump (compounded by any form of Brexit). We are especially vulnerable and it is that uncertainty which is causing the wobble. Look at the construction output figures released today - they have crashed. Property market sentiment has softened. Things can go south (or pop) very quickly. We are on a cliff edge here.
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Originally Posted by Cyrus View Post
what any market hates is uncertainty, the unresolved brexit issue has caused uncertainty which has certainly contributed.

the other factors are pretty obvious, the growth in prices of houses has surpassed the growth in earnings and has still as the CB rules have kicked in. In a functioning market with tight lending rules house prices should more or less rise with inflation.
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