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15-04-2018, 10:32   #46
Pierre_Robin
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Is the profession going to morph into Dr Google ?
I'm not quite sure what you mean.

There's some exciting stuff being done with machine learning and diagnostic radiology, though it's a while off replacing radiologists.

I probably simplified what I meant by pattern recognition. A lot of medicine is having seen a similar case previously, or perhaps more correctly, having seen tons of one type of presentation and so recognising the subtle difference in a new case. Or at least I've found that.
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30-05-2018, 17:00   #47
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I am selling Gold Standard GAMSAT books if you are interested in taking it. My dad did GRADMED when he was 37 and never looked back. Go for it
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30-05-2018, 21:44   #48
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I am selling Gold Standard GAMSAT books if you are interested in taking it. My dad did GRADMED when he was 37 and never looked back. Go for it
37 fairplay!

I'm currently in the midst of studying and grappling with doubting myself - could you tell us a bit more about your Dad? What was his career before, is he still working as a Doctor now?
Could use a good motivational story tbh
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14-01-2019, 20:57   #49
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If you want to do it then do it- I started GEMS last September aged 35 with a 2 year old and a 6 month old- I have no science background and I have no money- But I’m there and I love it-If you think you’ll regret not doing it then give it a go and sure if it doesn’t work out that’s fine too
Well done you! I’m 39 with young kids and would really love to do it. Am I crazy though?! I think those around me would say I am. But I think I will regret it if I don’t try
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14-01-2019, 21:14   #50
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Well done you! I’m 39 with young kids and would really love to do it. Am I crazy though?! I think those around me would say I am. But I think I will regret it if I don’t try
Early thirties, science degree. Thought about going back, but looked at the costs and decided against it. I'm not inherently a good person who just wants to help people, whilst it would be a perk I'd really be in it for the money. Going without my salary for 4 years, plus the 15k a year fees and living expenses..

I would recoup it eventually (even though Drs are not outreagously well paid at a lot of levels), however by intern year I'd be midthirties, another 10years of nchd posts that are manic.. I'd miss a large part of my kids early years and end up working myself to ****.. wish I had the sense to do it 10years ago though
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14-01-2019, 21:29   #51
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Early thirties, science degree. Thought about going back, but looked at the costs and decided against it. I'm not inherently a good person who just wants to help people, whilst it would be a perk I'd really be in it for the money. Going without my salary for 4 years, plus the 15k a year fees and living expenses..

I would recoup it eventually (even though Drs are not outreagously well paid at a lot of levels), however by intern year I'd be midthirties, another 10years of nchd posts that are manic.. I'd miss a large part of my kids early years and end up working myself to ****.. wish I had the sense to do it 10years ago though
Honestly, you made the right choice. Medicine is just a job, with a sh1t salary and horrible work life balance. You lose the best years of your life working for a company that knifes you in the back at every chance they can. Medicine in this country is dead. It's emigration or leave clinical medicine for most people. Our system is propped up by doctors from 3rd world countries but even they are starting to fight back.
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14-01-2019, 21:36   #52
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Honestly, you made the right choice. Medicine is just a job, with a sh1t salary and horrible work life balance. You lose the best years of your life working for a company that knifes you in the back at every chance they can. Medicine in this country is dead. It's emigration or leave clinical medicine for most people. Our system is propped up by doctors from 3rd world countries but even they are starting to fight back.
In fairness my wife was smarter and went straight to medicine from school, training was tough (hours/jobs/ and as you mentioned all the stuff that docs generally ought not to be doing, but it never seemed to bother her, just another job to be done whilst you haven't slept in two days ) but pretty amazing.
Gradmed at my age with my commitments and current salary is a no go. Medicine in ireland still has great opportunities and if one can travel even better. If I could go back in time, yes. Now.. no.
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22-01-2019, 13:03   #53
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Well done you! I’m 39 with young kids and would really love to do it. Am I crazy though?! I think those around me would say I am. But I think I will regret it if I don’t try
No you're not crazy to try.

I don't think there's a right answer to this question, and it varies from person to person. What matters is whether or not you think you're too old, because it's you who's going to be putting in the work and making the sacrifices. If you got into GEM this year, you'd have your degree and intern year finished by the age of 45. You'd then have 20+ years working as a doctor. That may not be as long as other people, but there's still plenty of time for you to be a doctor.
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22-01-2019, 13:29   #54
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Interesting thread. Few questions too.

I have considered it however. On paper I am an idiot. LC is a disaster area, 230/240 points, no degree or college. However in IT work and on decent pay.

But like someone said, I would rather a job with more satisfaction and helping people so to speak.

However, fitting in an entire LC repeat to aim for 600 odd points is a mental challenge, I would pick up on the Biology, Chem, Phys and Maths in about a very and more than likely come in with good results at HL. However, English, Irish and another language is just unworkable (maybe not English).

Are there other options for me to consider here?

Also, just out of interest, if you went the LC route, does the state 'pay' for your training and you pay the college fees or are you saddled up to 100k debt also?

I'm 28 now, so if I wrapped this up in 5 years or made headway on it and was settled in a role at 35 I could make progress and have a nice enjoyable career until my 70's that I would (hopefully)enjoy.

My problem at present is my paperwork, is LC route the only option here without a degree?

I wonder sometimes, is it a case of the grass is always greener on the other-side? I spent a month in hospital previously (with a catheter from a few places!), so I seen how hard everyone works. It's been on my mind a few years now and I have tried LC work, but get overwhelmed with the amount of content to cover
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23-01-2019, 00:39   #55
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Interesting thread. Few questions too.

I have considered it however. On paper I am an idiot. LC is a disaster area, 230/240 points, no degree or college. However in IT work and on decent pay.

But like someone said, I would rather a job with more satisfaction and helping people so to speak.

However, fitting in an entire LC repeat to aim for 600 odd points is a mental challenge, I would pick up on the Biology, Chem, Phys and Maths in about a very and more than likely come in with good results at HL. However, English, Irish and another language is just unworkable (maybe not English).

Are there other options for me to consider here?

Also, just out of interest, if you went the LC route, does the state 'pay' for your training and you pay the college fees or are you saddled up to 100k debt also?

I'm 28 now, so if I wrapped this up in 5 years or made headway on it and was settled in a role at 35 I could make progress and have a nice enjoyable career until my 70's that I would (hopefully)enjoy.

My problem at present is my paperwork, is LC route the only option here without a degree?

I wonder sometimes, is it a case of the grass is always greener on the other-side? I spent a month in hospital previously (with a catheter from a few places!), so I seen how hard everyone works. It's been on my mind a few years now and I have tried LC work, but get overwhelmed with the amount of content to cover
28 is very young indeed. Please don't listen to people telling you that you're too old or that life will be tougher than if you were younger. Medicine is tough and the sacrifices you make are unlike any you make in the majority of other careers. You will work A LOT and medical school requires a lot of focus and discipline. You can have a life outside of academics but in order to do well, you need to work a lot.

The life of a doctor isn't easy either: the healthcare systems across Europe are ridden with bureaucracy and underfunding and as a result you'll be doing more than you should be for little financial reward. But you know what? If despite all this, you still know that working in medicine is for you, then do it. I personally know the sacrifices I'm making and I don't regret it one minute. Medicine has been the most satisfying thing I have done to date. I work hard and challenge myself but the personal rewards outweigh anything I ever felt in my last career.
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23-01-2019, 00:42   #56
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Well done you! I’m 39 with young kids and would really love to do it. Am I crazy though?! I think those around me would say I am. But I think I will regret it if I don’t try
No, it's not crazy. I know a girl who went into medicine (6-year course) at 39 and is now excelling. She's happier than she ever was and wouldn't change it for anything. She left a VERY well paying job to do medicine as well. Just be sure you know what medicine entails and what working for a national health service means in terms of salary, pressure, etc...
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24-01-2019, 18:19   #57
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No, it's not crazy. I know a girl who went into medicine (6-year course) at 39 and is now excelling. She's happier than she ever was and wouldn't change it for anything. She left a VERY well paying job to do medicine as well. Just be sure you know what medicine entails and what working for a national health service means in terms of salary, pressure, etc...
Is it fair to get the government to fund you to train until you are 50 and then only provide 15 to 17 years of benefit back to the country before retiring?
I'd argue the states coffers would get more value training a person in their 20s.
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24-01-2019, 22:15   #58
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Is it fair to get the government to fund you to train until you are 50 and then only provide 15 to 17 years of benefit back to the country before retiring?
One could use the very same logic and suggest that it's not fair to train a doctor until he or she is 30 and then for said doctor to move to Australia.

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I'd argue the states coffers would get more value training a person in their 20s.
Again, the value is lost if the person leaves Ireland (which multiple reports are suggesting is the case). Fixing a shortage is to find multiple options, including incentivising older doctors who have more of a reason to stick around (mortgage, spouse, etc...)

Health policy should not be based on logic or what we 'feel' makes the most sense. Statistics and reason are far better tools.
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24-01-2019, 23:03   #59
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Has anyone any ideas on pathways into medicine? Bad LC, No degree and in different field (IT). Is it stricly LC only?
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24-01-2019, 23:05   #60
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Has anyone any ideas on pathways into medicine? Bad LC, No degree and in different field (IT). Is it stricly LC only?
Need LC and hpat or level 8 degree and gamsat
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