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17-10-2019, 14:32   #61
Neyite
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I've noticed that sewing and knitting is dying out.

Where a generation ago it was a way of making something new for yourself cheaper than anything you could buy, it's now something of a niche expensive hobby. And years ago it was a life skill you needed to know.


It's too expensive to make your own clothes now. I tried on a poorly-made jacket costing €60 in Next a few months ago and decided that I could make my own in a style and fabric I preferred. But the stuff I need to make it would cost over €200 AND some of those fixtures and snap buttons being shipped from China. If I were to charge for my time that it would take to make the bloody thing you are looking at three times that amount. It's mad.

There's a generation emerging that's never threaded a needle.
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17-10-2019, 14:41   #62
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Train travel is indeed nice but it requires good infrastructure. This is not the case in Ireland unfortunately and a lot of train networks are very outdated. It's a crime that there is no inter-european high speed rail network that would allow us to travel between major cities in a matter of hours.

Also it does get significantly more difficult to refuse air travel if you have family scattered all over the place. If I want to see my mother, I can either get a plane, 4 hours and costs 1k for 4 of us if we get a good deal or a couple of days but taking the ferry to France, drive all the way down to Huelva, take the ferry to the canaries that only goes once a week and it costs me double for all 4 of us.
It's a weird time where flying is often the cheaper option. But I agree, this short distance city hopping for leisure is a big problem that has to stop.
They seem more concerned with building more roads. A 245 million motorway was announced yesterday for Co Mayo that shaves like 5 minutes off people's journeys. Do the people there not want better rail services?
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17-10-2019, 14:53   #63
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They seem more concerned with building more roads. A 245 million motorway was announced yesterday for Co Mayo that shaves like 5 minutes off people's journeys. Do the people there not want better rail services?

No point if it leaves you still miles from your destination with no transport connections onwards though which is common in rural areas.
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17-10-2019, 15:21   #64
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No point if it leaves you still miles from your destination with no transport connections onwards though which is common in rural areas.
I know, but we need rail hubs all over the country really if we want to stop the dependence on cars
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17-10-2019, 15:37   #65
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I know, but we need rail hubs all over the country really if we want to stop the dependence on cars
Just imagine being able to get from Dublin to Sligo town in just over an hour. Or doing Wexford to Dublin in 45.
As it stands it would take me 3,5 hours one way to get from Wexford town to the capital. This isn't viable for commuters. It is beyond me why you wouldn't want to invest in a top public transport network that's affordable. As it stands I couldn't even safely walk or cycle over to the next village because the roads are bad, narrow, windy and everyone has to drive and drives fast.
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17-10-2019, 15:43   #66
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Originally Posted by Neyite View Post
I've noticed that sewing and knitting is dying out.

Where a generation ago it was a way of making something new for yourself cheaper than anything you could buy, it's now something of a niche expensive hobby. And years ago it was a life skill you needed to know.


It's too expensive to make your own clothes now. I tried on a poorly-made jacket costing €60 in Next a few months ago and decided that I could make my own in a style and fabric I preferred. But the stuff I need to make it would cost over €200 AND some of those fixtures and snap buttons being shipped from China. If I were to charge for my time that it would take to make the bloody thing you are looking at three times that amount. It's mad.

There's a generation emerging that's never threaded a needle.

It's not that it's expensive to make your own clothes it's that it's just so cheap to buy them.

I'm still young enough to be considered a 'millennial' and I regularly mend, alter and make clothes/curtains etc because I learnt it from my mother and I genuinely enjoy it.

Some people think its difficult or that they need a sewing machine and don't want to learn how to do it. Sadly it is a dying skill along with many others, we won't know how to do anything for ourselves before long.

For clothes you can't beat a decent charity shop.

With the exception of some necessities all of my clothes are second hand and believe me you cannot tell. I have managed to convert many family and friends over to charity shop buys after they admired something I was wearing and I told them where I got it.

Amazing the quality items that are just discarded and can be picked up for a few quid.

One man's trash.........

Last edited by Fringegirl; 17-10-2019 at 15:52.
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17-10-2019, 16:14   #67
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We need more Fringegirls in the world
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17-10-2019, 16:37   #68
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It's not that it's expensive to make your own clothes it's that it's just so cheap to buy them.

I'm still young enough to be considered a 'millennial' and I regularly mend, alter and make clothes/curtains etc because I learnt it from my mother and I genuinely enjoy it.

Some people think its difficult or that they need a sewing machine and don't want to learn how to do it. Sadly it is a dying skill along with many others, we won't know how to do anything for ourselves before long.

For clothes you can't beat a decent charity shop.

With the exception of some necessities all of my clothes are second hand and believe me you cannot tell. I have managed to convert many family and friends over to charity shop buys after they admired something I was wearing and I told them where I got it.

Amazing the quality items that are just discarded and can be picked up for a few quid.

One man's trash.........

Sewing is fine if you like it and have a flair for it but the incentive for the vast majority to return back to making do, mending, re-purposing old clothes into new uses isn't there any more when you can go into Pennys or Next. But sewing can work out expensive and you do need some equipment and materials to get you going.



I read recently that in the 1920's flour and animal feed companies noticed that their sacks were getting used for children's clothing and other items as the cotton was good quality, so the flour companies started to put patterns on their cotton sacks so that children's clothes could be more colourful. How cool is that?
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17-10-2019, 16:42   #69
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I know, but we need rail hubs all over the country really if we want to stop the dependence on cars
come on this is Ireland not IRLand.
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17-10-2019, 17:11   #70
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I read recently[/URL] that in the 1920's flour and animal feed companies noticed that their sacks were getting used for children's clothing and other items as the cotton was good quality, so the flour companies started to put patterns on their cotton sacks so that children's clothes could be more colourful. How cool is that?
Now that's innovation!!
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17-10-2019, 17:36   #71
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Originally Posted by Fringegirl View Post

With the exception of some necessities all of my clothes are second hand and believe me you cannot tell. I have managed to convert many family and friends over to charity shop buys after they admired something I was wearing and I told them where I got it.

Amazing the quality items that are just discarded and can be picked up for a few quid.

One man's trash.........
I made the commitment of not buying new clothes (except underwear and socks) for at least a year. I turned to second hand shopping instead especially online. You wouldn't believe how many good clothes are being sold for peanuts, with a lot of them being almost new. I recently bought 2 pairs of Next jeans on eBay, worn once, for 20 euro including postage. That's an 80% saving compared to the normal retail price. Or a virtually new pair of Lewis jeans for 15 quid. Or my most flattering dress that I got for 15 euros and is from a popular Eastern European brand.
The fast fashion industry drains me with the endless flood of ill-fitting garbage quality garments. I don't want to feed into that.
I know it's about picking battles and this is mine.
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17-10-2019, 18:14   #72
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Each country has to reduce population by 50%.
I know which group I'd start with.
Or bring it to the level it was at during the 1840's
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17-10-2019, 18:23   #73
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The "right to repair" should be pushed for and in some quarters it is.
From 2021 in the EU

https://ec.europa.eu/commission/pres.../qanda_19_5889
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What improvements have been proposed on reparability and durability of appliances?

In order to promote reparability, and therefore to increase the lifespan of appliances, several ecodesign measures aim at facilitating products repair by ensuring the availability of spare parts, in particular that:

spare parts are available over a long period of time after purchase, e.g.:

o 7 years minimum for refrigerating appliances (10 years for door gaskets);

o 10 years minimum for household washing-machines and household washer-dryers;

o 10 years minimum for household dishwashers (7 years for some parts for which access can be restricted to professional repairers);

o moreover, during that period, the manufacturer shall ensure the delivery of the spare parts within 15 working days.

spare parts can be replaced with the use of commonly available tools and without permanent damage to the appliance;

In order to enhance the repair market, manufacturers have to ensure the availability of repair and professional maintenance information for professional repairers.

Back in the day any electrical goods sold in Italy had to include a circuit diagram so this sort of thing isn't new.
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17-10-2019, 18:52   #74
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Travelling by train is so much nicer though, like loads of times when I lived in London I would take the train to Holyhead and then take the ferry, it's only 35 quid on the day from Euston. I could leave flat at 0830 and be back in me ma's at 1800 or so. If you take into account the stress and time involved going to airports etc it's not even that much different.
Unfortunately we're a bit more reliant on planes being an island, but I don't see why we need flights going to every corner of Europe and new routes being announced all the time. If you can fly to Paris or London or Madrid you can take trains anywhere really.
Trains are more relaxing but are usually stupid expensive. Off peak air fares beat rail over any sort of distance.

That £35 journey is now £49.00 (€52.59) But only because of the ferry. From Holyhead to Waterloo it's usually double that and more again to go to another station.

Ryanair can do it for €13.99 depending on when you can travel. If you don't mind getting a train to/from Gatwick

For goods trains and boats are more economic. But over long trips passengers need more than just minimum spacing of airline seats. All that dead weight for beds and cabins and promenades and adds up.
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18-10-2019, 11:54   #75
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Originally Posted by Permabear II View Post
The problem with smartphones is that manufacturers typically release a "must-have" upgrade every year. The lemmings are then driven bananas by the hype and believe that life is not worth living until get their hands on the newest model.
Never understood this. Considering replacing my 6-year old Kindle Fire as it's starting to get really sluggish. I've a 3-year old Moto G5 that still works fine. Couldn't care less about the OS.

Personally, I think any smartphone over a few hundred is an appalling waste of money but that's another topic.
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