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17-05-2019, 23:15   #16
Adam Khor
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Gliding "mammal" of the Jurassic discovered in China

The newly found creatures lived 160 million years ago and are the earliest known gliding forms from the mammal linneage (although whether they are to be classified as mammals themselves, or rather as advanced cynodonts, is not quite settled).

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature23476





The remarkable find also proves that mammal-like creatures were already diversified beyond what was thought by the mid Jurassic.
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06-06-2019, 06:46   #17
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The Mesozoic Mammal Thread

Earliest known primate was rodent-like climber

Purgatorius lived at the end of the Cretaceous, along with the last giant dinosaurs

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/...lution20121026


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15-06-2019, 04:21   #18
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One beautiful article contained the link for another:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s.../rise-mammals/
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23-07-2019, 08:24   #19
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Microdocodon, a very well preserved Jurassic mammaliform:

https://giantsciencelady.blogspot.co...-jurassic.html

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27-07-2019, 20:29   #20
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First Jurassic mammal from Scotland

https://giantsciencelady.blogspot.co...ammal-our.html

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27-08-2019, 18:48   #21
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Triassic mammal-like creature had saber teeth

Triassic mammal-like creature had saber teeth

Named Pseudotherium argentinus, it was only 25 cm long and was a cynodont, part of the group that gave rise to true mammals.

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology...nus-07533.html

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22-11-2019, 00:32   #22
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Those CT images are incredible:

http://www.digimorph.org/specimens/P...um_argentinus/
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05-12-2019, 22:40   #23
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I must confess I did not know that chewing is unique to mammals:

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One hundred and twenty million years ago, when northeastern China was a series of lakes and erupting volcanoes, there lived a tiny mammal just a few inches long. When it died, it was fossilized down to its most minuscule ear bones. And it is these ear bones that have so intrigued scientists: They are evidence of how evolution created the unique ear of mammals, giving modern mammals—including us—a finely tuned sense of hearing...

...The fossilized mammal found in northeastern China, named Origolestes lii, has an ear that looks close to modern. While parts of its body still look quite ancient, its ear bones, according to the study’s authors, have moved away and detached from the jaw. “That separation is critical because it allows the separation of hearing and chewing,” says Jin Meng, the curator of fossil mammals at the American Museum of Natural History and an author of the paper. And thus, the ear and the jaw could evolve separately in mammals, each specializing in what it does.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...earing/603124/
https://phys.org/news/2019-12-cretac...e-modules.html

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06-12-2019, 22:44   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ardillaun View Post
I must confess I did not know that chewing is unique to mammals:
Not quite- the tuatara is a rare example of a reptile that can chew:

https://phys.org/news/2012-05-tuatar...e-mammals.html

And so did several kinds of ornithischian dinosaurs, most notably the hadrosaurs (duck-billed dinosaurs). The mechanism is not the exact same though.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZkYcyYdZJU
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