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14-05-2019, 15:35   #16
ozbackineire
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Is this repeated anywhere? I meant to tape it but forgot
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14-05-2019, 15:39   #17
ceadaoin.
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While post partum and post natal depression can and does affect men the focus of the Theroux documentary is on the effect on Mother's.
I'm sure men can experience depression after the birth of their children but I don't think it's fair to label it as post partum or post natal. Those are conditions linked to hormones after giving birth and specifically refer to women. What men might go through is not the same thing. Women aren't even allowed to have their own birth related medical conditions now without it being all what about the men?
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14-05-2019, 15:39   #18
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true, also men cant feel emotions nor can they be abused, raped, or have deep bonds with their children.
Yeah that's totally what they said and what everyone here agrees with.

It's extraordinary the way even when it comes to a very difficult issue faced by women, some will try and make it about men.

There are issues that are faced by men - and this thread isn't about them so start a separate thread on them.
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14-05-2019, 15:43   #19
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My wife is pregnant, at one of the appointments there was a part that I wasn't in with her for. She was asked was she safe in her home, apparently standard a question. Fair enough I'm not the patient in their care however my unborn son is. Surely they should have asked me how she was coping, is she drinking or smoking.
"Surely"? Wouldn't they ask her that as part of her general check-ups?
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14-05-2019, 15:51   #20
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My wife is pregnant, at one of the appointments there was a part that I wasn't in with her for. She was asked was she safe in her home, apparently standard a question. Fair enough I'm not the patient in their care however my unborn son is. Surely they should have asked me how she was coping, is she drinking or smoking.
It is standard and it's done to protect women who may be in a controlling relationship.
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14-05-2019, 15:57   #21
Gimme A Pound
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Originally Posted by ceadaoin. View Post
I'm sure men can experience depression after the birth of their children but I don't think it's fair to label it as post partum or post natal. Those are conditions linked to hormones after giving birth and specifically refer to women. What men might go through is not the same thing.
Exactly. Men do indeed go through a significant upheaval when their child is born - the exhaustion, anxiety/stress, depression because of all of the above and because of such a drastic change, and the woman goes through all of that plus the hormonal changes and breastfeeding.

People coming along and saying "what about men?" on a thread like this... wtf is wrong with them.
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14-05-2019, 16:02   #22
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I miss Louis Theroux doing lighthearted stuff. Give me him raising an eyebrow while a swinger talks about their orgy
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14-05-2019, 16:52   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Feisar View Post
My wife is pregnant, at one of the appointments there was a part that I wasn't in with her for. She was asked was she safe in her home, apparently standard a question. Fair enough I'm not the patient in their care however my unborn son is. Surely they should have asked me how she was coping, is she drinking or smoking.

Maybe, as she is an adult they asked her directly if she was smoking or drinking, why would they ask you? You are not their patient.
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14-05-2019, 17:15   #24
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Maybe, as she is an adult they asked her directly if she was smoking or drinking, why would they ask you? You are not their patient.
Exactly. They test for smoking anyway as far as I know.
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14-05-2019, 17:16   #25
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While post partum and post natal depression can and does affect men the focus of the Theroux documentary is on the effect on Mother's.
I thought that PND was linked to the hormonal changes pregnancy brings.
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14-05-2019, 17:21   #26
Gimme A Pound
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Maybe, as she is an adult they asked her directly if she was smoking or drinking, why would they ask you? You are not their patient.
It's a bizarre post. "Why didn't they ask me if she drinks/smokes/is coping?" Wtf?
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14-05-2019, 18:02   #27
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While there's so many TV programmes on about giving birth (warts and all) it's great that a documentary like this was aired showing the reality of the mental health struggles that many women face following childbirth.

The amount of pressure that the first lady interviewed was putting on herself to be the perfect mother I found shocking. They all seemed like good mothers to me tbh.

I thought it was a positive that they were allowed keep their babies with them. I doubt recovery would be possible if you had very little contact with your baby during this time.
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14-05-2019, 18:34   #28
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Having the baby with them is part of the recovery process. It has clinical value. It's not some anti fathers conspiracy.
Its an unsafe environment for children, they are putting the kids at risk, would only take a second to do something to a child, no amount of supervision can stop that. It's in the child's best interest to be at home with the father or any other stable adult.

I wouldn't condone children being left with a father who had mental health problems either, no matter how helpful in their recovery
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14-05-2019, 18:40   #29
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Its an unsafe environment for children, they are putting the kids at risk, would only take a second to do something to a child, no amount of supervision can stop that. It's in the child's best interest to be at home with the father or any other stable adult.

I wouldn't condone children being left with a father who had mental health problems either, no matter how helpful in their recovery
Pretty sure that women with post natal depression are not at any higher risk of harming their children than someone without it. I guess the doctors know that the benefits of a secure attachment forming as a newborn, far outweigh the low risk of harm. There is a condition called post partum psychosis where there would be a risk, but that is relatively rare and likely to result in intervention before anything happens.
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14-05-2019, 18:47   #30
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There was an especially interesting talk with the clinical psychologist Dr Paul D'Alton on RTÉ's Drivetime yesterday. He was presenting an overview of the enormous field of medical evidence on the importance of stability and love in the first three years of a child's life with the emphasis on how this is affecting homeless children in Ireland today. It was a very, very disturbing listen - not least because every parent will be thinking about how they could have been better - and I got the strong impression that we are brewing up a storm when these kids grow up:

Paul D'Alton on RTÉ's Drivetime: Homeless children
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